ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Anthony Goldbloom - Machine learning expert
Anthony Goldbloom crowdsources solutions to difficult problems using machine learning.

Why you should listen

Anthony Goldbloom is the co-founder and CEO of Kaggle. Kaggle hosts machine learning competitions, where data scientists download data and upload solutions to difficult problems. Kaggle has a community of over 600,000 data scientists and has worked with companies ranging Facebook to GE on problems ranging from predicting friendships to flight arrival times.

Before Kaggle, Anthony worked as an econometrician at the Reserve Bank of Australia, and before that the Australian Treasury. In 2011 and 2012, Forbes named Anthony one of the 30 under 30 in technology; in 2013 the MIT Tech Review named him one of top 35 innovators under the age of 35, and the University of Melbourne awarded him an Alumni of Distinction Award. He holds a first call honors degree in Econometrics from the University of Melbourne.  

More profile about the speaker
Anthony Goldbloom | Speaker | TED.com
TED2016

Anthony Goldbloom: The jobs we'll lose to machines -- and the ones we won't

Ентони Голблум: Занимања кои ќе ги изгубиме заради машините и оние кои нема да ги изгубиме.

Filmed:
2,347,347 views

Машинското учење не служи само за едноставни задачи како што е проценка на кредитни ризици и сортирање на мејлови-денес, тоа има многу посложена примена како на пример оценување на есеи или дијагностицирање на болести. Овој напредок го следи едно прашање: дали во иднина вашата работа ќе ја врши робот?
- Machine learning expert
Anthony Goldbloom crowdsources solutions to difficult problems using machine learning. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:12
So this is my niece.
0
968
1262
Ова е мојата внука.
00:14
Her name is Yahli.
1
2644
1535
Нејзиното име е Јали.
00:16
She is nine months old.
2
4203
1511
Има девет месеци.
00:18
Her mum is a doctor,
and her dad is a lawyer.
3
6201
2528
Нејзината мајка е лекар,
а татко ѝ е адвокат.
00:21
By the time Yahli goes to college,
4
9269
2006
Додека Јали се запише на факултет,
00:23
the jobs her parents do
are going to look dramatically different.
5
11299
3253
занимањата на нејзините родители
драстично ќе се изменат.
00:27
In 2013, researchers at Oxford University
did a study on the future of work.
6
15347
5073
Во 2013 научници од Оксфорд направија
студија за иднината на занимањата.
00:32
They concluded that almost one
in every two jobs have a high risk
7
20766
4139
Тие тврдат дека речиси едно
од две занимања има висок ризик
00:36
of being automated by machines.
8
24929
1824
да биде машински автоматизирано.
00:40
Machine learning is the technology
9
28388
1905
Машинското учење е технологијата
00:42
that's responsible for most
of this disruption.
10
30317
2278
која е најодговорна за овие промени.
00:44
It's the most powerful branch
of artificial intelligence.
11
32619
2790
Таа е најмоќната гранка на
вештачката интелигенција.
00:47
It allows machines to learn from data
12
35433
1882
Овозможува машините да учат од податоци
00:49
and mimic some of the things
that humans can do.
13
37339
2592
и да имитираат одредени
работи кои луѓето ги прават.
00:51
My company, Kaggle, operates
on the cutting edge of machine learning.
14
39955
3415
Мојата фирма Кегл се занимава со
најнапредниот вид на машинско учење.
00:55
We bring together
hundreds of thousands of experts
15
43394
2386
Собираме стотици илјадници стручњаци
00:57
to solve important problems
for industry and academia.
16
45804
3118
да решаваат значајни проблеми за
индустријата и науката.
01:01
This gives us a unique perspective
on what machines can do,
17
49279
3222
Тоа ни дава единствена перспектива
за можностите на машините,
01:04
what they can't do
18
52525
1235
што можат и што не можат,
01:05
and what jobs they might
automate or threaten.
19
53784
2939
и кои занимања можат да ги автоматизираат
или загрозат.
01:09
Machine learning started making its way
into industry in the early '90s.
20
57316
3550
Машинското учење започна да се користи
во индустријата во 90-те.
01:12
It started with relatively simple tasks.
21
60890
2124
Започна со прилично едноставни задачи.
01:15
It started with things like assessing
credit risk from loan applications,
22
63406
4115
Започна со проценка на
кредитни ризици кај позајмици,
01:19
sorting the mail by reading
handwritten characters from zip codes.
23
67545
4053
сортирање на мејлови со читање на
ракописни букви од зип кодови.
01:24
Over the past few years, we have made
dramatic breakthroughs.
24
72036
3169
Изминативе години достигнавме
огромен пресврт.
01:27
Machine learning is now capable
of far, far more complex tasks.
25
75586
3916
Машинското учење сега може да
извршува посложени задачи
01:31
In 2012, Kaggle challenged its community
26
79860
3231
Во 2012 Кегл ја предизвика
својата заедница
01:35
to build an algorithm
that could grade high-school essays.
27
83115
3189
да изгради алгоритам за оценување
на есеи во средни училишта.
01:38
The winning algorithms
were able to match the grades
28
86328
2604
Победничките алгоритми беа
во состојба да дадат оцени
01:40
given by human teachers.
29
88956
1665
блиски на оцените од наставниците.
01:43
Last year, we issued
an even more difficult challenge.
30
91092
2984
Лани имавме уште потежок предизвик.
01:46
Can you take images of the eye
and diagnose an eye disease
31
94100
2953
Може да го сликате окото и да
дијагностицирате очна болест
01:49
called diabetic retinopathy?
32
97077
1694
наречена дијабетична ретинопатија?
01:51
Again, the winning algorithms
were able to match the diagnoses
33
99164
4040
Повторно, победничките алгоритми
можеа да дадат дијагнози
01:55
given by human ophthalmologists.
34
103228
1825
слични на оние од офталмолозите.
01:57
Now, given the right data,
machines are going to outperform humans
35
105561
3212
Со давање на точни податоци, машините
ќе ги надминат луѓето
02:00
at tasks like this.
36
108797
1165
во слични задачи.
02:01
A teacher might read 10,000 essays
over a 40-year career.
37
109986
3992
Наставникот може да прочита 10.000 есеи
во 40 години кариера.
02:06
An ophthalmologist might see 50,000 eyes.
38
114407
2360
Офталмологот може да прегледа 50.000 очи.
02:08
A machine can read millions of essays
or see millions of eyes
39
116791
3913
Машината може да прочита милиони есеи
и да провери милиони очи
02:12
within minutes.
40
120728
1276
за неколку минути.
02:14
We have no chance of competing
against machines
41
122456
2858
Немаме шанси во натпреварот со машините
02:17
on frequent, high-volume tasks.
42
125338
2321
кај чести и обемни задачи.
02:20
But there are things we can do
that machines can't do.
43
128665
3724
Но, има работи кои можеме да ги правиме
а машините не можат.
02:24
Where machines have made
very little progress
44
132791
2200
Машините немаат достигнато голем напредок
02:27
is in tackling novel situations.
45
135015
1854
во справување со нови состојби.
02:28
They can't handle things
they haven't seen many times before.
46
136893
3899
Не можат да се носат со нешта
кои не ги виделе претходно.
02:33
The fundamental limitations
of machine learning
47
141321
2584
Суштинската ограниченост
на машинското учење
02:35
is that it needs to learn
from large volumes of past data.
48
143929
3394
е што машините учат од обемните
претходни податоци.
02:39
Now, humans don't.
49
147347
1754
Луѓето не прават така.
02:41
We have the ability to connect
seemingly disparate threads
50
149125
3030
Ние сме во состојба да поврземе
навидум неповрзани нишки
02:44
to solve problems we've never seen before.
51
152179
2238
и да решиме проблем кој
не сме го имале порано.
02:46
Percy Spencer was a physicist
working on radar during World War II,
52
154808
4411
Перси Спенсер беше физичар кој работел
на радар во Втората светска војна
02:51
when he noticed the magnetron
was melting his chocolate bar.
53
159243
3013
и забележал дека магнетронот
го топи неговото чоколадо.
02:54
He was able to connect his understanding
of electromagnetic radiation
54
162970
3295
Можел да го поврзе познавањето на
електромагнетното зрачење
02:58
with his knowledge of cooking
55
166289
1484
со познавањето на готвењето
02:59
in order to invent -- any guesses? --
the microwave oven.
56
167797
3258
за да ја открие-ќе погодите?
Микробрановата печка.
03:03
Now, this is a particularly remarkable
example of creativity.
57
171444
3073
Ова е посебен, исклучителен
пример за креативност.
03:06
But this sort of cross-pollination
happens for each of us in small ways
58
174541
3664
Но, вакви плодни вкрстувања
ни се случуваат
03:10
thousands of times per day.
59
178229
1828
илјадници пати во текот на денот.
Справување со нови ситуации
е нешто што машините
03:12
Machines cannot compete with us
60
180501
1661
03:14
when it comes to tackling
novel situations,
61
182186
2251
не можат да го прават толку добро
колку луѓето.
03:16
and this puts a fundamental limit
on the human tasks
62
184461
3117
Тоа значи дека е ограничен бројот
на задачи кои машините
03:19
that machines will automate.
63
187602
1717
ќе можат да ги автоматизираат.
03:22
So what does this mean
for the future of work?
64
190041
2405
Што значи тоа за иднината на занимањата:
03:24
The future state of any single job lies
in the answer to a single question:
65
192804
4532
Иднината на секое занимање лежи
во одговорот на едно прашање:
03:29
To what extent is that job reducible
to frequent, high-volume tasks,
66
197360
4981
До кој степен може едно занимање да
се сведе на зачестени, обемни задачи,
03:34
and to what extent does it involve
tackling novel situations?
67
202365
3253
и до кој степен е вклучено
справувањето со нови ситуации?
03:37
On frequent, high-volume tasks,
machines are getting smarter and smarter.
68
205975
4035
Машините стануваат сѐ попаметни
кај зачестените и обемни задачи.
03:42
Today they grade essays.
They diagnose certain diseases.
69
210034
2714
Денес тие оценуваат есеи.
Дијагностицираат болести.
03:44
Over coming years,
they're going to conduct our audits,
70
212772
3157
Во наредните години ќе
спроведуваат ревизии
03:47
and they're going to read boilerplate
from legal contracts.
71
215953
2967
и ќе читаат текстови од правни договори.
03:50
Accountants and lawyers are still needed.
72
218944
1997
Сеуште требаат сметководители и правници.
03:52
They're going to be needed
for complex tax structuring,
73
220965
2682
Тие ќе требаат за сложените
даночни структуирања
03:55
for pathbreaking litigation.
74
223671
1357
на иновативни парници.
03:57
But machines will shrink their ranks
75
225052
1717
Но машините ќе ги стеснат овие звања
03:58
and make these jobs harder to come by.
76
226793
1872
и потешко ќе се наоѓаат работни места.
04:00
Now, as mentioned,
77
228689
1151
Како што реков,
04:01
machines are not making progress
on novel situations.
78
229864
2949
машините не се снаоѓаат добро
во нови ситуации.
04:04
The copy behind a marketing campaign
needs to grab consumers' attention.
79
232837
3457
Пораката на рекламната кампања
мора да го привлече потрошувачот.
04:08
It has to stand out from the crowd.
80
236318
1715
Треба да се истакнува во толпата.
04:10
Business strategy means
finding gaps in the market,
81
238057
2444
Бизнис стартегија значи
наоѓање дупки во пазарот,
04:12
things that nobody else is doing.
82
240525
1756
нешто што никој друг не го прави.
04:14
It will be humans that are creating
the copy behind our marketing campaigns,
83
242305
4118
Тоа се луѓето кои стојат зад пораките
на рекламните кампањи
04:18
and it will be humans that are developing
our business strategy.
84
246447
3517
и луѓето се тие кои ја развиваат
бизнис стратегијата.
04:21
So Yahli, whatever you decide to do,
85
249988
2817
Значи, Јали, што и да одлучиш да правиш,
04:24
let every day bring you a new challenge.
86
252829
2361
нека секој нов ден ти
донесе нов предизвик.
04:27
If it does, then you will stay
ahead of the machines.
87
255587
2809
Само така, ќе бидеш пред машините.
04:31
Thank you.
88
259126
1176
Ви благодарам!
04:32
(Applause)
89
260326
3104
(Аплауз)

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Anthony Goldbloom - Machine learning expert
Anthony Goldbloom crowdsources solutions to difficult problems using machine learning.

Why you should listen

Anthony Goldbloom is the co-founder and CEO of Kaggle. Kaggle hosts machine learning competitions, where data scientists download data and upload solutions to difficult problems. Kaggle has a community of over 600,000 data scientists and has worked with companies ranging Facebook to GE on problems ranging from predicting friendships to flight arrival times.

Before Kaggle, Anthony worked as an econometrician at the Reserve Bank of Australia, and before that the Australian Treasury. In 2011 and 2012, Forbes named Anthony one of the 30 under 30 in technology; in 2013 the MIT Tech Review named him one of top 35 innovators under the age of 35, and the University of Melbourne awarded him an Alumni of Distinction Award. He holds a first call honors degree in Econometrics from the University of Melbourne.  

More profile about the speaker
Anthony Goldbloom | Speaker | TED.com