ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Mariano Sigman - Neuroscientist
In his provocative, mind-bending book "The Secret Life of the Mind," neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reveals his life’s work exploring the inner workings of the human brain.

Why you should listen

Mariano Sigman, a physicist by training, is a leading figure in the cognitive neuroscience of learning and decision making. Sigman was awarded a Human Frontiers Career Development Award, the National Prize of Physics, the Young Investigator Prize of "College de France," the IBM Scalable Data Analytics Award and is a scholar of the James S. McDonnell Foundation. In 2016 he was made a Laureate of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

In The Secret Life of the Mind, Sigman's ambition is to explain the mind so that we can understand ourselves and others more deeply. He shows how we form ideas during our first days of life, how we give shape to our fundamental decisions, how we dream and imagine, why we feel certain emotions, how the brain transforms and how who we are changes with it. Spanning biology, physics, mathematics, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, philosophy and medicine, as well as gastronomy, magic, music, chess, literature and art, The Secret Life of the Mind revolutionizes how neuroscience serves us in our lives, revealing how the infinity of neurons inside our brains manufacture how we perceive, reason, feel, dream and communicate.

More profile about the speaker
Mariano Sigman | Speaker | TED.com
TED2016

Mariano Sigman: Your words may predict your future mental health

Мариано Сигман: Вашите зборови можат да го предвидат вашето ментално здравје

Filmed:
2,809,594 views

Може ли, начинот на кој зборуваш и пишуваш денес, да го предвиди твоето идно ментално здравје, па дури и настанокот на психоза? Во овој фасцинантен говор, невронаучникот Мариано Сигман се навраќа на древна Грција и потеклото на интроспекцијата за да покаже како зборовите говорат за нашиот внатрешен живот. Воедно, тој зборува за алгоритам кој ги мапира зборовите и кој би можел да ја предвиди појавата на шизофренија. "Во иднина можеби ќе имаме многу поразлична дијагностика на менталното здравје," вели Сигман, "базирана на објективна, квантитативна и автоматизирана анализа на зборовите кои ги пишуваме и на оние кои ги изговараме."
- Neuroscientist
In his provocative, mind-bending book "The Secret Life of the Mind," neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reveals his life’s work exploring the inner workings of the human brain. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:13
We have historical records that allow us
to know how the ancient Greeks dressed,
0
1006
5150
Имаме историски записи од кои знаеме
како се облекувале древните грци,
00:18
how they lived,
1
6180
1254
како живееле,
00:19
how they fought ...
2
7458
1522
како се бореле ...
00:21
but how did they think?
3
9004
1524
но како размислувале?
00:23
One natural idea is that the deepest
aspects of human thought --
4
11432
4440
Постои сфаќање кое вели дека
суштината на човечката мисла --
00:27
our ability to imagine,
5
15896
1872
нашата способност да замислуваме,
00:29
to be conscious,
6
17792
1397
да бидеме свесни,
00:31
to dream --
7
19213
1231
да сонуваме --
00:32
have always been the same.
8
20468
1619
отсекогаш била иста.
00:34
Another possibility
9
22872
1499
Другото сфаќање
00:36
is that the social transformations
that have shaped our culture
10
24395
3723
е дека социјалните трансформации
кои ја обликувале нашата култура
00:40
may have also changed
the structural columns of human thought.
11
28142
3785
истовремено ја промениле и
структурата на човечката мисла.
00:44
We may all have different
opinions about this.
12
32911
2524
Постојат различни мислења
за ова.
00:47
Actually, it's a long-standing
philosophical debate.
13
35459
2717
Всушност, ова е долга филозофска
дебата.
00:50
But is this question
even amenable to science?
14
38644
2727
Но, дали ова прашање е воопшто
податливо за науката?
00:54
Here I'd like to propose
15
42834
2506
Исто како што можеме да го реконструираме
00:57
that in the same way we can reconstruct
how the ancient Greek cities looked
16
45364
4772
изгледот на древните грчки градови,
01:02
just based on a few bricks,
17
50160
2388
користејќи само неколку тули,
01:04
that the writings of a culture
are the archaeological records,
18
52572
4126
можеме и да ја реконструираме човечката
мисла, овојпат користејќи
01:08
the fossils, of human thought.
19
56722
2143
ги записите на културата.
01:11
And in fact,
20
59905
1174
Всушност,
01:13
doing some form of psychological analysis
21
61103
2206
правејќи еден вид на психолошка анализа
01:15
of some of the most ancient
books of human culture,
22
63333
3544
на некои од најдревните книги
на човечката култура,
01:18
Julian Jaynes came up in the '70s
with a very wild and radical hypothesis:
23
66901
5955
Џулијан Џејнс, во 70-тите, предложил
многу необична и радикална теза:
01:24
that only 3,000 years ago,
24
72880
2413
дека само пред 3.000 години,
01:27
humans were what today
we would call schizophrenics.
25
75317
4888
луѓето биле она што денес
го нарекуваме шизофреничари.
01:33
And he made this claim
26
81753
1508
Ова тврдење го поткрепил
01:35
based on the fact that the first
humans described in these books
27
83285
3301
со фактот дека во овие книги
биле опишани луѓе,
01:38
behaved consistently,
28
86610
1904
од различни традиции и од
различни краеви на светот,
01:40
in different traditions
and in different places of the world,
29
88538
3016
кои се однесувале така како
01:43
as if they were hearing and obeying voices
30
91578
3532
да слушаат и им се покоруваат на гласови
01:47
that they perceived
as coming from the Gods,
31
95134
3040
за кои мислеле дека доаѓаат од Боговите,
01:50
or from the muses ...
32
98198
1198
или од музите ...
01:52
what today we would call hallucinations.
33
100063
2769
ова денес го нарекуваме халуцинации.
01:55
And only then, as time went on,
34
103888
2626
И како што одминувало времето,
01:58
they began to recognize
that they were the creators,
35
106538
3651
луѓето почнале да сфаќаат дека
тие се креаторите,
02:02
the owners of these inner voices.
36
110213
2515
дека гласовите се всушност нивни.
02:05
And with this, they gained introspection:
37
113316
2715
И на овој начин, тие стекнале
интроспекција:
02:08
the ability to think
about their own thoughts.
38
116055
2483
способноста да размислуваат
за нивните мисли.
02:11
So Jaynes's theory is that consciousness,
39
119785
3397
Теоријата на Џејнс е дека свесноста,
02:15
at least in the way we perceive it today,
40
123206
3166
барем онака како што ја дефинираме денес,
02:18
where we feel that we are the pilots
of our own existence --
41
126396
3540
она чувство дека ние управуваме со
нашето постоење --
02:21
is a quite recent cultural development.
42
129960
2737
е прилично скорашен производ
на културниот развој.
02:25
And this theory is quite spectacular,
43
133456
1786
Теоријава е прилично спектакуларна,
02:27
but it has an obvious problem
44
135266
1433
но очигледно има проблем,
02:28
which is that it's built on just a few
and very specific examples.
45
136723
3992
а тоа е дека се базира само на неколку
многу специфични примери.
02:33
So the question is whether the theory
46
141085
1763
Оттука, прашањето е дали теоријата,
02:34
that introspection built up in human
history only about 3,000 years ago
47
142872
4751
која вели дека интроспекцијата се појавила
пред само 3.000,
02:39
can be examined in a quantitative
and objective manner.
48
147647
2984
може да биде испитана на квантитативен
и објективен начин.
02:43
And the problem of how
to go about this is quite obvious.
49
151543
3563
Очигледно е дека не е лесно
да се тестира оваа теза.
02:47
It's not like Plato woke up one day
and then he wrote,
50
155130
3460
Многу би ни било полесно
доколку Платон се разбудил и напишал,
02:50
"Hello, I'm Plato,
51
158614
1659
"Здраво, јас сум Платон,
02:52
and as of today, I have
a fully introspective consciousness."
52
160297
2889
и од денес јас имам целосно
интроспективна свесност."
02:55
(Laughter)
53
163210
2293
(Смеа)
02:57
And this tells us actually
what is the essence of the problem.
54
165527
3333
Ова всушност ни кажува што
е суштината на проблемот.
03:01
We need to find the emergence
of a concept that's never said.
55
169467
4055
Треба да откриеме како настанал
концепт што никогаш не бил изговорен.
03:06
The word introspection
does not appear a single time
56
174434
4310
Зборот интроспекција не се појавува
ниту еднаш
03:10
in the books we want to analyze.
57
178768
1919
во книгите кои сакаме да ги анализираме.
03:13
So our way to solve this
is to build the space of words.
58
181728
4087
Ние ова го решивме така што го
создадовме просторот на зборови.
03:18
This is a huge space
that contains all words
59
186571
3287
Ова е огромен простор
кој ги содржи сите зборови
03:21
in such a way that the distance
between any two of them
60
189882
2802
на таков начин што растојанието
помеѓу било кои два збора
03:24
is indicative of how
closely related they are.
61
192708
2883
ни кажува колку тие се поврзани.
03:28
So for instance,
62
196460
1151
На пример,
03:29
you want the words "dog" and "cat"
to be very close together,
63
197635
2897
зборовите "куче" и "мачка" би требало
да се многу блиску еден до друг,
03:32
but the words "grapefruit" and "logarithm"
to be very far away.
64
200556
3831
но зборовите "грејпфрут" и "логаритам"
би требало да се многу далеку.
03:36
And this has to be true
for any two words within the space.
65
204809
3896
Ова важи за било кои два збора во
рамки на просторот.
03:41
And there are different ways
that we can construct the space of words.
66
209626
3341
Исто така, на повеќе начини можеме
да го конструираме просторот.
03:44
One is just asking the experts,
67
212991
1643
Можеме да ги прашаме стручњаците,
03:46
a bit like we do with dictionaries.
68
214658
1896
исто како кога прегледуваме речник.
03:48
Another possibility
69
216896
1428
Или пак можеме
03:50
is following the simple assumption
that when two words are related,
70
218348
3715
да се водиме од претпоставката
дека кога два збора се поврзани,
03:54
they tend to appear in the same sentences,
71
222087
2349
тие се појавуваат во исти реченици,
03:56
in the same paragraphs,
72
224460
1453
во исти пасуси,
03:57
in the same documents,
73
225937
1770
во исти документи,
03:59
more often than would be expected
just by pure chance.
74
227731
3182
многу почесто отколку ако
е чиста случајност.
04:04
And this simple hypothesis,
75
232231
2050
Оваа едноставна хипотеза,
04:06
this simple method,
76
234305
1306
овој едноставен метод,
04:07
with some computational tricks
77
235635
1607
користејќи програмерски трикови
04:09
that have to do with the fact
78
237266
1389
оти станува збор за многу
04:10
that this is a very complex
and high-dimensional space,
79
238679
3064
сложен повеќе-димензионален
простор,
04:13
turns out to be quite effective.
80
241767
1665
излезе дека е доста ефикасен.
04:16
And just to give you a flavor
of how well this works,
81
244155
2802
Само за да видите колку добро
функционира ова,
04:18
this is the result we get when
we analyze this for some familiar words.
82
246981
3912
ова е резултатот кој го добиваме кога
ќе анализираме некои познати зборови.
04:23
And you can see first
83
251607
1185
Најпрвин може да видите
04:24
that words automatically organize
into semantic neighborhoods.
84
252816
3278
дека зборовите автоматски се организираат
во семантички групи.
04:28
So you get the fruits, the body parts,
85
256118
2217
Имате овошје, делови на телото,
04:30
the computer parts,
the scientific terms and so on.
86
258359
2425
компјутерски делови, научните
термини итн.
04:33
The algorithm also identifies
that we organize concepts in a hierarchy.
87
261119
4222
Алгоритамот ни кажува дека ние и
хиерархиски ги организираме концептите.
04:37
So for instance,
88
265852
1151
На пример,
04:39
you can see that the scientific terms
break down into two subcategories
89
267027
3597
може да видите дека научните термини
се групираат во две подкатегории,
04:42
of the astronomic and the physics terms.
90
270648
2100
термини од астрономијата и
од физиката.
04:45
And then there are very fine things.
91
273338
2246
Потоа имате многу суптилни работи.
04:47
For instance, the word astronomy,
92
275608
1905
На пример, зборот астрономија,
04:49
which seems a bit bizarre where it is,
93
277537
1815
кој навидум е на чудна локација,
04:51
is actually exactly where it should be,
94
279376
2048
е всушност токму онаму каде
што треба да биде,
04:53
between what it is,
95
281448
1595
помеѓу она што е,
04:55
an actual science,
96
283067
1270
наука
04:56
and between what it describes,
97
284361
1536
и помеѓу она што го опишува,
04:57
the astronomical terms.
98
285921
1492
астрономски термини.
05:00
And we could go on and on with this.
99
288182
1891
И вака можеме до бескрај.
05:02
Actually, if you stare
at this for a while,
100
290097
2060
Всушност, ако се задлабочите
во ова,
05:04
and you just build random trajectories,
101
292181
1858
и почнете да правите шеми,
05:06
you will see that it actually feels
a bit like doing poetry.
102
294063
3166
ќе имате чувство како да
пишувате поезија.
05:10
And this is because, in a way,
103
298018
1882
А тоа е така затоа што, на некој начин,
05:11
walking in this space
is like walking in the mind.
104
299924
2940
да чекориш во овој простор
е како да чекориш во умот.
05:16
And the last thing
105
304027
1617
И последното е
05:17
is that this algorithm also identifies
what are our intuitions,
106
305668
4040
дека овој алгоритам
ги потврдува нашите претпоставки
05:21
of which words should lead
in the neighborhood of introspection.
107
309732
3896
за тоа кои зборови би требало да
се најмногу поврзани со интроспекцијата.
05:25
So for instance,
108
313652
1223
На пример,
05:26
words such as "self," "guilt,"
"reason," "emotion,"
109
314899
3979
зборови како "себство," "вина,"
"разум," "емоција,"
05:30
are very close to "introspection,"
110
318902
1889
се многу блиску до "интроспекција,"
05:32
but other words,
111
320815
1151
но други зборови,
05:33
such as "red," "football,"
"candle," "banana,"
112
321990
2167
како "црвена," "фудбал," "свеќа,"
"банана,"
05:36
are just very far away.
113
324181
1452
се многу далеку.
05:38
And so once we've built the space,
114
326054
2762
Откако ќе го изградиме просторот,
05:40
the question of the history
of introspection,
115
328840
2826
прашањето за потеклото
на интроспекцијата,
05:43
or of the history of any concept
116
331690
2333
или потеклото на било кој концепт
05:46
which before could seem abstract
and somehow vague,
117
334047
4779
кое претходно можеби изгледало
апстрактно или некако нејасно,
05:50
becomes concrete --
118
338850
1604
сега станува конкретно --
05:52
becomes amenable to quantitative science.
119
340478
2738
станува податливо за
квантитивно изучување.
05:56
All that we have to do is take the books,
120
344216
2762
Се што треба да направиме е да
ги земеме книгите,
05:59
we digitize them,
121
347002
1381
да ги дигитализираме,
06:00
and we take this stream
of words as a trajectory
122
348407
2809
да ги извадиме зборовите
06:03
and project them into the space,
123
351240
1969
да ги проектираме во просторот,
06:05
and then we ask whether this trajectory
spends significant time
124
353233
3754
и да се запрашаме која група на
зборови кружи најдолго и најблиску
06:09
circling closely to the concept
of introspection.
125
357011
2992
околку концептот интроспекција.
06:12
And with this,
126
360760
1196
На овој начин,
06:13
we could analyze
the history of introspection
127
361980
2112
можеме да ја анализираме
историјата на интроспекцијата
06:16
in the ancient Greek tradition,
128
364116
1921
во древната грчка традиција,
06:18
for which we have the best
available written record.
129
366061
2602
за која имаме најдобри
пишани записи.
06:21
So what we did is we took all the books --
130
369631
2255
Значи ги зедовме сите книги --
06:23
we just ordered them by time --
131
371910
2284
ги подредивме според времето --
од секоја книга ги извадивме зборовите,
06:26
for each book we take the words
132
374218
1752
06:27
and we project them to the space,
133
375994
1961
ги проектиравме во просторот,
06:29
and then we ask for each word
how close it is to introspection,
134
377979
3032
и потоа гледавме колку секој збор
е блиску до интроспекцијата,
06:33
and we just average that.
135
381035
1230
и пресметувавме просек.
06:34
And then we ask whether,
as time goes on and on,
136
382590
3198
Потоа, се запрашавме дали,
како што одминува времето,
06:37
these books get closer,
and closer and closer
137
385812
3252
овие книги се приближуваат
сѐ повеќе и повеќе
06:41
to the concept of introspection.
138
389088
1754
до концептот интроспекција.
06:42
And this is exactly what happens
in the ancient Greek tradition.
139
390866
3801
И токму тоа се случува
во рамки на древната грчка традиција.
06:47
So you can see that for the oldest books
in the Homeric tradition,
140
395698
3127
Може да видите дека најстарите книги
од времето на Хомер,
06:50
there is a small increase with books
getting closer to introspection.
141
398849
3412
се малку поврзани со интроспекцијата.
06:54
But about four centuries before Christ,
142
402285
2206
Но отприлика четири века пред
нашата ера,
06:56
this starts ramping up very rapidly
to an almost five-fold increase
143
404515
4708
настанува драстично приближување,
книгите од овој период
07:01
of books getting closer,
and closer and closer
144
409247
2500
пет пати се поблиску до
07:03
to the concept of introspection.
145
411771
1682
концептот интроспекција.
07:06
And one of the nice things about this
146
414159
2424
И интересно е тоа
07:08
is that now we can ask
147
416607
1198
што сега, истото ова
07:09
whether this is also true
in a different, independent tradition.
148
417829
4147
можеме да го испитаме и во
други традиции.
Истата оваа анализа ја спроведовме
и во Јудео-Христијанската традиција,
07:14
So we just ran this same analysis
on the Judeo-Christian tradition,
149
422962
3176
07:18
and we got virtually the same pattern.
150
426162
2721
и ја откривме буквално истата шема.
07:21
Again, you see a small increase
for the oldest books in the Old Testament,
151
429548
4635
И повторно, најстарите книги од
Стариот Завет се малку поврзани,
а потоа книгите од Новиот Завет
се приближуваат брзо
07:26
and then it increases much more rapidly
152
434207
1914
и се многу поблиску до интроспекцијата.
07:28
in the new books of the New Testament.
153
436145
1839
07:30
And then we get the peak of introspection
154
438008
2032
И тогаш го имаме врвот на интроспекцијата
07:32
in "The Confessions of Saint Augustine,"
155
440064
2127
во "Исповедите на Свети Августин,"
07:34
about four centuries after Christ.
156
442215
1857
четири века после Исус Христос.
07:36
And this was very important,
157
444897
1944
И ова е многу важно,
07:38
because Saint Augustine
had been recognized by scholars,
158
446865
3373
зашто Свети Августин, се смета,
од страна на научниците,
07:42
philologists, historians,
159
450262
2172
филолозите, историчарите,
07:44
as one of the founders of introspection.
160
452458
2078
како еден од основачите
на интроспекцијата.
07:47
Actually, some believe him to be
the father of modern psychology.
161
455060
3297
Всушност, некои сметаат дека тој
е таткото на модерната психологија.
07:51
So our algorithm,
162
459012
1839
Значи нашиот алгоритам,
07:52
which has the virtue
of being quantitative,
163
460875
2842
кој како предност го има тоа
што е квантитативен,
07:55
of being objective,
164
463741
1263
објективен,
07:57
and of course of being extremely fast --
165
465028
2016
и се разбира, исклучиво брз --
07:59
it just runs in a fraction of a second --
166
467068
2397
пресметува во дел од секундата --
08:01
can capture some of the most
important conclusions
167
469489
3503
може да ги искристализира најважните
заклучоци
08:05
of this long tradition of investigation.
168
473016
2222
од ова долго истражување.
08:08
And this is in a way
one of the beauties of science,
169
476317
3651
На некој начин ова е убавината
на науката,
08:11
which is that now this idea
can be translated
170
479992
3476
сега оваа идеја може да се преведе
08:15
and generalized to a whole lot
of different domains.
171
483492
2571
и да се воопшти во многу
други подрачја.
08:18
So in the same way that we asked
about the past of human consciousness,
172
486769
4767
Исто онака како што прашувавме за
минатото на човековата свесност,
08:23
maybe the most challenging question
we can pose to ourselves
173
491560
3406
сега можеме да си го поставиме можеби
најпредизвикувачкото прашање,
08:26
is whether this can tell us something
about the future of our own consciousness.
174
494990
4137
дали оваа метода може да ни каже
нешто за иднината на нашата свесност.
08:31
To put it more precisely,
175
499550
1470
Да бидам попрецизен,
08:33
whether the words we say today
176
501044
2416
дали зборовите кои денес ги изговараме
08:35
can tell us something
of where our minds will be in a few days,
177
503484
5197
можат да ни кажат за тоа каде
ќе бидат нашите умови за неколку дена,
08:40
in a few months
178
508705
1151
за неколку месеци
08:41
or a few years from now.
179
509880
1182
или за неколку години од сега.
08:43
And in the same way many of us
are now wearing sensors
180
511597
3020
И исто како што многумина од нас
сега носат сензори
08:46
that detect our heart rate,
181
514641
1786
за мерење на пулсот,
08:48
our respiration,
182
516451
1269
на дишењето,
08:49
our genes,
183
517744
1667
на гените,
08:51
on the hopes that this may
help us prevent diseases,
184
519435
3651
во надеж дека ова ќе ни помогне
да спречиме болести,
08:55
we can ask whether monitoring
and analyzing the words we speak,
185
523110
3521
на истиот овој начин можеби, анализирањето
на зборовите кои ги изговараме,
08:58
we tweet, we email, we write,
186
526655
2683
твитаме, испраќаме, пишуваме,
09:01
can tell us ahead of time whether
something may go wrong with our minds.
187
529362
4808
ќе ни каже предвреме, дали нешто
не е во ред со нашиот ум.
09:07
And with Guillermo Cecchi,
188
535087
1534
И со Џилермо Сечи,
09:08
who has been my brother in this adventure,
189
536645
3001
мојот сопатник во оваа авантура,
09:11
we took on this task.
190
539670
1555
се нафативме на задачата.
09:14
And we did so by analyzing
the recorded speech of 34 young people
191
542228
5532
Го анализиравме снимениот
говор на 34 млади луѓе
09:19
who were at a high risk
of developing schizophrenia.
192
547784
2801
кои имаа висок ризик да заболат
од шизофренија.
09:23
And so what we did is,
we measured speech at day one,
193
551434
2881
Го меревме говорот во првиот наврат,
и потоа се запрашавме дали особините
на говорот можат да го предвидат,
09:26
and then we asked whether the properties
of the speech could predict,
194
554339
3242
09:29
within a window of almost three years,
195
557605
2496
во рамки на три години,
09:32
the future development of psychosis.
196
560125
2035
јавувањето на психоза.
09:35
But despite our hopes,
197
563427
2366
Но, и покрај нашите надежи,
09:37
we got failure after failure.
198
565817
3117
доживеавме неколку неуспеси.
09:41
There was just not enough
information in semantics
199
569793
3882
Едноставно немаше доволно
информации во семантиката
09:45
to predict the future
organization of the mind.
200
573699
2793
за да може да се предвиди
иднината на умот.
09:48
It was good enough
201
576516
1809
Можно беше да се разликуваат
09:50
to distinguish between a group
of schizophrenics and a control group,
202
578349
4175
шизофреничарите од нормалните
субјекти,
09:54
a bit like we had done
for the ancient texts,
203
582548
2712
слично како кај древните текстови,
09:57
but not to predict the future
onset of psychosis.
204
585284
2994
но не можеше да се предвиди
почетокот на психозата.
10:01
But then we realized
205
589164
1706
И тогаш ни текна
10:02
that maybe the most important thing
was not so much what they were saying,
206
590894
4088
дека можеби не е толку важно
што зборуваат
10:07
but how they were saying it.
207
595006
1673
туку како зборуваат.
10:09
More specifically,
208
597679
1220
Поточно,
10:10
it was not in which semantic
neighborhoods the words were,
209
598923
2827
не беше важно во која семантичка група
се нивните зборови,
10:13
but how far and fast they jumped
210
601774
2600
туку колку далеку и колку брзо скокаат
10:16
from one semantic neighborhood
to the other one.
211
604398
2301
од една семантичка група во друга.
10:19
And so we came up with this measure,
212
607247
1731
Оттука, смисливме една мерка,
10:21
which we termed semantic coherence,
213
609002
2389
која ја нарековме семантичка кохерентност,
10:23
which essentially measures the persistence
of speech within one semantic topic,
214
611415
4804
која во основа мери колку долго говорот се
задржува во рамки на една семантичка тема,
10:28
within one semantic category.
215
616243
1529
во рамки на една семантичка категорија.
10:31
And it turned out to be
that for this group of 34 people,
216
619294
4047
И излезе дека за оваа група од 34
луѓе,
10:35
the algorithm based on semantic
coherence could predict,
217
623365
3659
алгоритамот водејќи се од семантичката
кохерентност можеше да предвиди
10:39
with 100 percent accuracy,
218
627048
2500
со 100 процентна сигурност
10:41
who developed psychosis and who will not.
219
629572
2507
кој ќе развие психоза, а кој не.
10:44
And this was something
that could not be achieved --
220
632976
2937
Ова е нешто што не можеше
да се постигне --
10:47
not even close --
221
635937
1508
ниту одблизу --
10:49
with all the other
existing clinical measures.
222
637469
3126
со другите клинички мерки.
10:54
And I remember vividly,
while I was working on this,
223
642525
3579
И се сеќавам многу јасно,
додека работев на ова,
10:58
I was sitting at my computer
224
646128
2317
бев на мојот компјутер
11:00
and I saw a bunch of tweets by Polo --
225
648469
2635
кога видов еден куп твитови од Поло --
11:03
Polo had been my first student
back in Buenos Aires,
226
651128
3167
Поло ми беше прв студент
кога бев во Буенос Аирес,
11:06
and at the time
he was living in New York.
227
654319
2070
а кога се случи ова тој живееше
во Њујорк.
11:08
And there was something in this tweets --
228
656413
2088
Имаше нешто во неговите твитови --
11:10
I could not tell exactly what
because nothing was said explicitly --
229
658525
3501
не можев да кажам што бидејќи
немаше нешто очигледно --
11:14
but I got this strong hunch,
230
662050
2021
но ми се јави силно претчувство,
11:16
this strong intuition,
that something was going wrong.
231
664095
2955
силна интуиција, дека нешто не е
во ред.
11:20
So I picked up the phone,
and I called Polo,
232
668347
2723
Го кренав телефонот и му се јавив на Поло.
11:23
and in fact he was not feeling well.
233
671094
1919
Излезе дека не му е добро.
11:25
And this simple fact,
234
673362
1937
Овој едноставен факт,
11:27
that reading in between the lines,
235
675323
2491
читањето меѓу редови,
11:29
I could sense,
through words, his feelings,
236
677838
4262
тоа што преку неговите зборови ги
насетив неговите чувства,
11:34
was a simple, but very
effective way to help.
237
682124
2619
беше едноставен, но многу ефикасен
начин да помогнам.
11:37
What I tell you today
238
685987
1638
Она што сакам да ви кажам
11:39
is that we're getting
close to understanding
239
687649
2508
е дека сме се поблизу до решението
11:42
how we can convert this intuition
that we all have,
240
690181
4286
на тоа како да ја претвориме оваа
интуиција што сите ја имаме,
11:46
that we all share,
241
694491
1365
што сите ја делиме,
11:47
into an algorithm.
242
695880
1197
во алгоритам.
11:50
And in doing so,
243
698102
1461
Ако успееме,
11:51
we may be seeing in the future
a very different form of mental health,
244
699587
4650
во иднина можеби ќе имаме многу поразлична
дијагностика на менталното здравје,
11:56
based on objective, quantitative
and automated analysis
245
704261
5621
која ќе се заснова на објективна,
квантитативна и автоматизирана анализа
на зборовите што ги пишуваме
12:01
of the words we write,
246
709906
1709
и на зборовите што ги изговараме.
12:03
of the words we say.
247
711639
1537
12:05
Gracias.
248
713200
1151
Благодарам
12:06
(Applause)
249
714375
6883
(Аплауз)

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Mariano Sigman - Neuroscientist
In his provocative, mind-bending book "The Secret Life of the Mind," neuroscientist Mariano Sigman reveals his life’s work exploring the inner workings of the human brain.

Why you should listen

Mariano Sigman, a physicist by training, is a leading figure in the cognitive neuroscience of learning and decision making. Sigman was awarded a Human Frontiers Career Development Award, the National Prize of Physics, the Young Investigator Prize of "College de France," the IBM Scalable Data Analytics Award and is a scholar of the James S. McDonnell Foundation. In 2016 he was made a Laureate of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

In The Secret Life of the Mind, Sigman's ambition is to explain the mind so that we can understand ourselves and others more deeply. He shows how we form ideas during our first days of life, how we give shape to our fundamental decisions, how we dream and imagine, why we feel certain emotions, how the brain transforms and how who we are changes with it. Spanning biology, physics, mathematics, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, philosophy and medicine, as well as gastronomy, magic, music, chess, literature and art, The Secret Life of the Mind revolutionizes how neuroscience serves us in our lives, revealing how the infinity of neurons inside our brains manufacture how we perceive, reason, feel, dream and communicate.

More profile about the speaker
Mariano Sigman | Speaker | TED.com