ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Jonathan Haidt - Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral and political creatures.

Why you should listen

By understanding more about our moral psychology and its biases, Jonathan Haidt says we can design better institutions (including companies, universities and democracy itself), and we can learn to be more civil and open-minded toward those who are not on our team.

Haidt is a social psychologist whose research on morality across cultures led to his 2008 TED Talk on the psychological roots of the American culture war, and his 2013 TED Talk on how "common threats can make common ground." In both of those talks he asks, "Can't we all disagree more constructively?" Haidt's 2012 TED Talk explored the intersection of his work on morality with his work on happiness to talk about "hive psychology" -- the ability that humans have to lose themselves in groups pursuing larger projects, almost like bees in a hive. This hivish ability is crucial, he argues, for understanding the origins of morality, politics, and religion. These are ideas that Haidt develops at greater length in his book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion.

Haidt joined New York University Stern School of Business in July 2011. He is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership, based in the Business and Society Program. Before coming to Stern, Professor Haidt taught for 16 years at the University of Virginia in the department of psychology.

Haidt's writings appear frequently in the New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He was named one of the top global thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine and by Prospect magazine. Haidt received a B.A. in Philosophy from Yale University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

More profile about the speaker
Jonathan Haidt | Speaker | TED.com
Chris Anderson - TED Curator
After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Why you should listen

Chris Anderson is the Curator of TED, a nonprofit devoted to sharing valuable ideas, primarily through the medium of 'TED Talks' -- short talks that are offered free online to a global audience.

Chris was born in a remote village in Pakistan in 1957. He spent his early years in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, where his parents worked as medical missionaries, and he attended an American school in the Himalayas for his early education. After boarding school in Bath, England, he went on to Oxford University, graduating in 1978 with a degree in philosophy, politics and economics.

Chris then trained as a journalist, working in newspapers and radio, including two years producing a world news service in the Seychelles Islands.

Back in the UK in 1984, Chris was captivated by the personal computer revolution and became an editor at one of the UK's early computer magazines. A year later he founded Future Publishing with a $25,000 bank loan. The new company initially focused on specialist computer publications but eventually expanded into other areas such as cycling, music, video games, technology and design, doubling in size every year for seven years. In 1994, Chris moved to the United States where he built Imagine Media, publisher of Business 2.0 magazine and creator of the popular video game users website IGN. Chris eventually merged Imagine and Future, taking the combined entity public in London in 1999, under the Future name. At its peak, it published 150 magazines and websites and employed 2,000 people.

This success allowed Chris to create a private nonprofit organization, the Sapling Foundation, with the hope of finding new ways to tackle tough global issues through media, technology, entrepreneurship and, most of all, ideas. In 2001, the foundation acquired the TED Conference, then an annual meeting of luminaries in the fields of Technology, Entertainment and Design held in Monterey, California, and Chris left Future to work full time on TED.

He expanded the conference's remit to cover all topics, including science, business and key global issues, while adding a Fellows program, which now has some 300 alumni, and the TED Prize, which grants its recipients "one wish to change the world." The TED stage has become a place for thinkers and doers from all fields to share their ideas and their work, capturing imaginations, sparking conversation and encouraging discovery along the way.

In 2006, TED experimented with posting some of its talks on the Internet. Their viral success encouraged Chris to begin positioning the organization as a global media initiative devoted to 'ideas worth spreading,' part of a new era of information dissemination using the power of online video. In June 2015, the organization posted its 2,000th talk online. The talks are free to view, and they have been translated into more than 100 languages with the help of volunteers from around the world. Viewership has grown to approximately one billion views per year.

Continuing a strategy of 'radical openness,' in 2009 Chris introduced the TEDx initiative, allowing free licenses to local organizers who wished to organize their own TED-like events. More than 8,000 such events have been held, generating an archive of 60,000 TEDx talks. And three years later, the TED-Ed program was launched, offering free educational videos and tools to students and teachers.

More profile about the speaker
Chris Anderson | Speaker | TED.com
TEDNYC

Jonathan Haidt: Can a divided America heal?

ジョナサン・ハイト: アメリカは対立から立ち直れるか?

Filmed:
1,864,998 views

アメリカは否定的で党派心むき出しだった2016年大統領選挙から、どうやったら立ち直れるでしょうか?社会心理学者ジョナサン・ハイトは、私たちの政治的選択の基礎となる道徳性を研究しています。TEDキュレーター クリス・アンダーソンとの対話を通じて、彼はアメリカにこれほど激しい対立をもたらした思考パターンと歴史的な原因を説明します。そして、どうすればアメリカが前進できるか、ビジョンを示してくれます。
- Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral and political creatures. Full bio - TED Curator
After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

クリス・アンダーソン:
ジョン 怖い状況ですね
00:12
Chrisクリス Andersonアンダーソン: So, Jonジョン, this feels感じる scary怖い.
0
936
2200
ジョナサン・ハイト:ええ
00:15
Jonathanジョナサン Haidtハイト: Yeah.
1
3160
1165
クリス:今の世界は 私たちが
00:16
CACA: It feels感じる like the world世界 is in a place場所
2
4349
1990
しばらく経験したことのない状況に
陥っている気がします
00:18
that we haven't持っていない seen見た for a long time.
3
6363
1837
00:20
People don't just disagree同意しない
in the way that we're familiar身近な with,
4
8224
4561
私たちがよく知る
左派と右派の政治的対立のせいで
00:24
on the left-right左右 political政治的 divide分ける.
5
12809
1900
人々の意見が
噛み合わないだけでなく
00:26
There are much deeperもっと深く differences相違 afoot起こす.
6
14733
3001
もっと深い溝が
出来つつあります
00:29
What on earth地球 is going on,
and how did we get here?
7
17758
3266
一体何が起こっていて
なぜ こうなってしまったのでしょう?
00:33
JHJH: This is different異なる.
8
21048
3003
ジョナサン:確かに
これまでとは違います
00:36
There's a much more
apocalyptic黙示録的な sortソート of feeling感じ.
9
24075
3227
はるかに絶望的な感覚ですね
00:39
Survey調査 research研究 by Pewピュー Research研究 showsショー
10
27326
2326
ピュー研究所の調査で
わかったことですが
00:41
that the degree to whichどの we feel
that the other side is not just --
11
29676
3709
対立する陣営に関する
我々の感情は
00:45
we don't just dislike嫌い them;
we strongly強く dislike嫌い them,
12
33409
2974
単に相手を嫌うだけでなく
激しい嫌悪であり
00:48
and we think that they are
a threat脅威 to the nation国家.
13
36407
3476
国家の脅威とすら
考えています
00:51
Those numbers数字 have been going up and up,
14
39907
1964
嫌悪感を持つ人の割合は
どんどん増加し
今では両陣営ともに
5割を超えています
00:53
and those are over 50 percentパーセント
now on bothどちらも sides両側.
15
41895
2737
みんな怯えていますが
00:56
People are scared怖い,
16
44656
1151
それは 以前とは違って
極端だと感じているからです
00:57
because it feels感じる like this is different異なる
than before; it's much more intense激しい.
17
45831
3627
私は 社会的な難問を
検討する時はいつも
01:01
Wheneverいつでも I look
at any sortソート of socialソーシャル puzzleパズル,
18
49482
2520
01:04
I always apply適用する the three basic基本的な
principles原則 of moral道徳 psychology心理学,
19
52026
3117
道徳心理学の
3つの基本原則を利用しますが
ここでも役に立ちそうです
01:07
and I think they'll彼らは help us here.
20
55167
1894
01:09
So the first thing that you
have to always keep in mindマインド
21
57085
2733
政治のことを考える時に
まず忘れてはならないのは
01:11
when you're thinking考え about politics政治
22
59842
1736
人間が「同族中心」だという点です
01:13
is that we're tribal部族.
23
61602
1380
01:15
We evolved進化した for tribalism部族主義.
24
63006
1523
我々は同族志向へと進化しました
01:16
One of the simplest最も単純な and greatest最大
insights洞察 into human人間 socialソーシャル nature自然
25
64553
3169
人間の社会的な本質を表す
最もシンプルで偉大な洞察に
こんな ベドウィンの
ことわざがあります
01:19
is the Bedouinベドウィン proverb:
26
67746
1173
01:20
"Me againstに対して my brother;
27
68943
1392
「自分は 兄弟と対立し
01:22
me and my brother againstに対して our cousinいとこ;
28
70359
1927
自分と兄弟は
いとこと対立し
01:24
me and my brother and cousinsいとこ
againstに対して the strangerストレンジャー."
29
72310
2502
自分と兄弟といとこは
よそ者と対立する」
01:26
And that tribalism部族主義 allowed許可された us
to create作成する large societies社会
30
74836
4724
この同族意識のおかげで
人間は 大規模な社会を築き
01:31
and to come together一緒に
in order注文 to compete競争する with othersその他.
31
79584
3032
協力して 他者と
競争できるようになりました
01:34
That brought持ってきた us out of the jungleジャングル
and out of small小さい groupsグループ,
32
82640
3681
また同族意識は 我々がジャングルを出て
小さな群れを捨てた要因ですが
01:38
but it means手段 that we have
eternal永遠の conflict紛争.
33
86345
2023
その結果 永久に闘争が
続くことになりました
ここで検討すべきなのは
01:40
The question質問 you have to look at is:
34
88392
1741
「状況が厳しさを増した原因は
社会のどの側面にあり
01:42
What aspects側面 of our society社会
are making作る that more bitter苦い,
35
90157
2664
どうすれば沈静化するか」です
01:44
and what are calming落ち着かせる them down?
36
92845
1530
01:46
CACA: That's a very darkダーク proverb.
37
94399
1561
クリス:とても悲観的な
ことわざですね
つまり同族意識は ほぼ全員の心理に
焼き付けられているということですか?
01:47
You're saying言って that that's actually実際に
baked焼きました into most最も people's人々の mental精神的な wiring配線
38
95984
4173
つまり同族意識は ほぼ全員の心理に
焼き付けられているということですか?
01:52
at some levelレベル?
39
100181
1151
ジョナサン:その通りです
これは人間の社会的認知の基礎ですから
01:53
JHJH: Oh, absolutely絶対に. This is just
a basic基本的な aspectアスペクト of human人間 socialソーシャル cognition認知.
40
101356
3804
一方 我々は平和に
共存することもできて
01:57
But we can alsoまた、 liveライブ together一緒に
really peacefully平和的に,
41
105184
2323
戦争をまねた様々な楽しみを
発明してきました
01:59
and we've私たちは invented発明された all kinds種類
of fun楽しい ways方法 of, like, playing遊ぶ war戦争.
42
107531
3395
それがスポーツや政治ですが
02:02
I mean, sportsスポーツ, politics政治 --
43
110950
1382
こういうものはすべて
同族中心という性質を
02:04
these are all ways方法 that we get
to exercise運動 this tribal部族 nature自然
44
112356
3695
02:08
withoutなし actually実際に hurting傷つける anyone誰でも.
45
116075
1583
誰も傷つけずに
行動に表す方法です
また 我々は商業や探検や
新たな人との出会いが得意です
02:09
We're alsoまた、 really good at tradeトレード
and exploration探査 and meeting会議 new新しい people.
46
117682
4345
02:14
So you have to see our tribalism部族主義
as something that goes行く up or down --
47
122051
3299
だから同族主義には
良し悪しがあると考えるべきです
我々は戦い続ける定めにある
わけではないけれど
02:17
it's not like we're doomed運命の
to always be fighting戦う each other,
48
125374
2852
世界平和も達成できないんです
02:20
but we'll私たちは never have world世界 peace平和.
49
128250
1850
クリス:集団のサイズは
伸縮しますよね
02:22
CACA: The sizeサイズ of that tribe部族
can shrinkシュリンク or expand拡大する.
50
130980
3222
ジョナサン:そうです
02:26
JHJH: Right.
51
134226
1151
クリス:「仲間」と捉える集団の規模と
02:27
CACA: The sizeサイズ of what we consider検討する "us"
52
135401
1987
02:29
and what we consider検討する "other" or "them"
53
137412
2421
「他者」と捉える集団の規模は
02:31
can change変化する.
54
139857
2130
変化します
02:34
And some people believed信じる that processプロセス
could continue持続する indefinitely無限に.
55
142610
5590
そして この過程が永久に続くと
考える人もいますね
02:40
JHJH: That's right.
56
148224
1192
ジョナサン:そうです
クリス:私たちは長い間
同族意識を拡張してきました
02:41
CACA: And we were indeed確かに expanding拡大する
the senseセンス of tribe部族 for a while.
57
149440
3206
02:44
JHJH: So this is, I think,
58
152670
1161
ジョナサン:私の考えでは
02:45
where we're getting取得 at what's possiblyおそらく
the new新しい left-right左右 distinction区別.
59
153855
3355
おそらく我々は新たな左派と右派の
区別に達しつつあるんです
02:49
I mean, the left-right左右
as we've私たちは all inherited継承されました it,
60
157234
2323
つまり これまでの左派と右派は
労働者と資本家の区別とか
02:51
comes来る out of the labor労働
versus capital資本 distinction区別,
61
159581
2839
労働階級やマルクスから
生じたものです
02:54
and the workingワーキング classクラス, and Marxマルクス.
62
162444
2375
02:56
But I think what we're seeing見る
now, increasinglyますます,
63
164843
2249
しかし現在 我々が
目の当たりにしつつあるのは
欧米の民主主義国家すべてで
起きている分裂です
02:59
is a divide分ける in all the Western西洋 democracies民主主義
64
167116
2854
03:01
betweenの間に the people
who want to stop at nation国家,
65
169994
3707
片方には 国家の枠組み内に
留まりたい人々や
より地域主義であろうとする人々 —
03:05
the people who are more parochial偏狭 --
66
173725
1750
03:07
and I don't mean that in a bad悪い way --
67
175499
1797
これは悪い意味ではありません —
あるいは 地元に根付いているという
感覚を持つ人々がいて
03:09
people who have much more
of a senseセンス of beingであること rooted根付いた,
68
177320
2800
03:12
they careお手入れ about their彼らの townタウン,
their彼らの communityコミュニティ and their彼らの nation国家.
69
180144
3193
自分の街や地域や国のことを
気にかけています
03:15
And then those who are
anti-parochial抗偏性 and who --
70
183824
4037
その一方で 地域主義に
反対する人々がいます
03:19
wheneverいつでも I get confused混乱した, I just think
of the Johnジョン Lennonレノン song "Imagine想像する."
71
187885
3400
私は混乱すると いつもジョン・レノンの
『イマジン』を思い浮かべます
「想像してごらん 国のない世界を
殺す相手も 死ぬ理由もない」
03:23
"Imagine想像する there's no countries,
nothing to kill殺します or die死ぬ for."
72
191309
2829
このような人々は
よりグローバルな統治を求め
03:26
And so these are the people
who want more globalグローバル governanceガバナンス,
73
194162
3213
03:29
they don't like nation国家 states,
they don't like borders国境.
74
197399
2674
民族国家や国境を嫌います
03:32
You see this all over Europeヨーロッパ as well.
75
200097
1825
こういう状況は ヨーロッパ中で目にします
03:33
There's a great metaphor隠喩 guy --
actually実際に, his name is Shakespeareシェイクスピア --
76
201946
3226
すごく比喩の上手な人がいて —
シェイクスピアという姓ですが
彼はイギリスで
10年前に書いた記事の中で
03:37
writing書き込み ten years ago in Britain英国.
77
205196
1581
03:38
He had a metaphor隠喩:
78
206801
1167
こんな比喩を使いました
03:39
"Are we drawbridge-uppersドローブリッジアッパー
or drawbridge-downersドローブリッジダウン?"
79
207992
3273
「我々は 城門を閉ざす派か
城門を開く派か?」
03:43
And Britain英国 is divided分割された
52-48 on that pointポイント.
80
211289
2905
イギリスで両派は
52%と48%に分かれました
03:46
And Americaアメリカ is divided分割された on that pointポイント, too.
81
214218
2120
アメリカでも この点では
意見が割れています
03:49
CACA: And so, those of us
who grew成長しました up with The Beatlesビートルズ
82
217379
3577
クリス:私たちのように
ビートルズとか
03:52
and that sortソート of hippieヒッピー philosophy哲学
of dreaming of a more connected接続された world世界 --
83
220980
3574
1つの世界を夢見るヒッピー哲学と
共に育った人間は
そういう世界が まさに理想なので
快く思わない人がいるとは信じられません
03:56
it feltフェルト so idealistic理想主義的な and "how could
anyone誰でも think badlyひどく about that?"
84
224578
3841
04:00
And what you're saying言って is that, actually実際に,
85
228736
2011
でも あなたの話だと
そんな世界が現実離れした話ではなく
危険で 間違ったものと感じ
04:02
millions何百万 of people today今日
feel that that isn't just silly愚かな;
86
230771
4302
04:07
it's actually実際に dangerous危険な and wrong違う,
and they're scared怖い of it.
87
235097
2861
恐れている人が
数百万人いるということですね
ジョナサン:アメリカもそうですが
ヨーロッパで特に深刻なのは
04:09
JHJH: I think the big大きい issue問題, especially特に
in Europeヨーロッパ but alsoまた、 here,
88
237982
3026
移民の問題だと思います
04:13
is the issue問題 of immigration移民.
89
241032
1367
だから今こそ多様性と移民について
04:14
And I think this is where
we have to look very carefully慎重に
90
242423
3069
04:17
at the socialソーシャル science科学
about diversity多様性 and immigration移民.
91
245516
3631
社会学的に 慎重に
検討すべきだと思うんです
04:21
Once一度 something becomes〜になる politicized政治化された,
92
249171
1714
ひとたび問題が政治色を帯びて
04:22
once一度 it becomes〜になる something
that the left loves愛する and the right --
93
250909
3024
左派のお気に入りとか
右派のお気に入りになってしまうと
社会学者ですら その問題を
理路整然とは考えられなくなります
04:25
then even the socialソーシャル scientists科学者
can't think straightまっすぐ about it.
94
253957
3101
04:29
Now, diversity多様性 is good in a lot of ways方法.
95
257082
1957
多様性には たくさん
良いところがあります
そのおかげで
技術革新は目覚しい進歩を遂げ
04:31
It clearlyはっきりと creates作成する more innovation革新.
96
259063
2207
アメリカの経済は
急成長してきたんですから
04:33
The Americanアメリカ人 economy経済
has grown成長した enormously巨大 from it.
97
261294
2477
多様性や移民には
良い面がたくさんあるんです
04:35
Diversity多様性 and immigration移民
do a lot of good things.
98
263795
2382
でもグローバリズムの支持者が
見落としていること —
04:38
But what the globalistsグローバリスト,
I think, don't see,
99
266201
2628
直視するのを避けていることは
04:40
what they don't want to see,
100
268853
1507
人種の多様性が社会関係資本と
信頼を損なうという点です
04:42
is that ethnicエスニック diversity多様性
cutsカット socialソーシャル capital資本 and trust信頼.
101
270384
6278
04:48
There's a very important重要
study調査 by Robertロバート Putnamパトナム,
102
276686
2336
『孤独なボウリング』の著者
ロバート・パットナムは
ある重要な研究の中で
04:51
the author著者 of "Bowlingボーリング Alone一人,"
103
279046
1856
社会関係資本の
データベースを調べています
04:52
looking at socialソーシャル capital資本 databasesデータベース.
104
280926
1855
大まかに言うと 自分たちは同じだと
感じる人が増えると
04:54
And basically基本的に, the more people
feel that they are the same同じ,
105
282805
2947
04:57
the more they trust信頼 each other,
106
285776
1507
相互の信頼が高まり
再分配を重視する
福祉国家になりやすいんです
04:59
the more they can have
a redistributionist再分配主義者 welfare福祉 state状態.
107
287307
2740
スカンジナビア諸国が
とても素晴らしいのは
05:02
Scandinavianスカンジナビア語 countries are so wonderful素晴らしい
108
290071
1971
小さな単一民族国家の
名残があるからです
05:04
because they have this legacy遺産
of beingであること small小さい, homogenous均質な countries.
109
292066
3349
これが進歩的な福祉国家や
05:07
And that leadsリード to
a progressiveプログレッシブ welfare福祉 state状態,
110
295439
3717
05:11
a setセット of progressiveプログレッシブ
left-leaning左傾き values, whichどの says言う,
111
299180
2803
進歩的で左寄りの価値観へと繋がり
こんな形であらわれます
05:14
"Drawbridgeドローブリッジ down!
The world世界 is a great place場所.
112
302007
3001
「城門を開けろ!
世界は素晴らしい
05:17
People in Syriaシリア are suffering苦しみ --
we must必須 welcomeようこそ them in."
113
305032
3032
シリア国民は苦しんでいる
入国を歓迎しなければ」
これは立派なことです
05:20
And it's a beautiful綺麗な thing.
114
308088
1377
05:21
But if, and I was in Swedenスウェーデン
this summer,
115
309934
2583
ただし —
私は この夏スウェーデンにいましたが
もしスウェーデンにおける言論で
非差別が強調され
05:24
if the discourse談話 in Swedenスウェーデン
is fairlyかなり politically政治的に correct正しい
116
312541
3183
05:27
and they can't talk about the downsides欠点,
117
315748
2237
国民がマイナス面を
話せない状況であれば
結局 大量の難民を
受け入れることになるでしょう
05:30
you end終わり up bringing持参 a lot of people in.
118
318009
1987
すると 社会関係資本は損なわれ
05:32
That's going to cutカット socialソーシャル capital資本,
119
320020
1692
福祉国家の維持は難しくなり
05:33
it makes作る it hardハード to have a welfare福祉 state状態
120
321736
1945
最終的には アメリカと同じように
05:35
and they mightかもしれない end終わり up,
as we have in Americaアメリカ,
121
323705
2556
目に見えて 人種的に分断された
社会になってしまうかもしれません
05:38
with a racially人種的に divided分割された, visibly目に見える
racially人種的に divided分割された, society社会.
122
326285
3613
05:41
So this is all very
uncomfortable不快な to talk about.
123
329922
2260
だから これは話しづらい問題なんです
ただ この点こそ
特にヨーロッパで そしてアメリカでも
05:44
But I think this is the thing,
especially特に in Europeヨーロッパ and for us, too,
124
332206
3245
検討すべきことでしょう
05:47
we need to be looking at.
125
335475
1193
クリス:つまり理性的な人々 すなわち
05:48
CACA: You're saying言って that people of reason理由,
126
336692
2086
自分たちは人種差別主義者ではなく
道徳的で誠実だと
05:50
people who would consider検討する
themselves自分自身 not racists人種差別主義者,
127
338802
2488
思っている人々でさえ
05:53
but moral道徳, upstanding直立 people,
128
341314
1727
人間は 極めて多様だから
05:55
have a rationale根拠 that says言う
humans人間 are just too different異なる;
129
343065
2946
あまりに違う人間同士が混じり合うと
許容できる限界を超える危険があると
05:58
that we're in danger危険 of overloading過負荷
our senseセンス of what humans人間 are capable可能な of,
130
346035
5439
06:03
by mixing混合 in people who are too different異なる.
131
351498
2490
考えているということですね
06:06
JHJH: Yes, but I can make it
much more palatable口当たりの良い
132
354012
3540
ジョナサン:そうですが
人種の問題に限定しなければ
06:09
by saying言って it's not necessarily必ずしも about raceレース.
133
357576
2798
もっと受け入れやすくなるでしょう
06:12
It's about culture文化.
134
360819
1267
これは文化の問題なんです
06:14
There's wonderful素晴らしい work by a political政治的
scientist科学者 named名前 Karenカレン StennerStenner,
135
362110
4173
政治学者のカレン・ステナーという人が
素晴らしい研究をしていて
人々は団結していて
みんな同じだと感じている時は
06:18
who showsショー that when people have a senseセンス
136
366307
3227
権威主義的な傾向を持つ人が
06:21
that we are all unitedユナイテッド,
we're all the same同じ,
137
369558
2235
06:23
there are manyたくさんの people who have
a predisposition素因 to authoritarianism権威主義.
138
371817
3250
多くなることを
明らかにしました
こういった人々は
社会的秩序や
06:27
Those people aren'tない particularly特に racist人種差別主義者
139
375091
2042
道徳的秩序に対する
脅威がないと感じる限り
06:29
when they feel as throughを通して
there's not a threat脅威
140
377157
2167
特に人種差別的ではありません
06:31
to our socialソーシャル and moral道徳 order注文.
141
379348
1699
06:33
But if you primeプライム them experimentally実験的に
142
381071
2033
ところが実験的に 彼らに対して
我々は分裂しつつあり
違いが増していると信じ込ませると
06:35
by thinking考え we're coming到来 apart離れて,
people are getting取得 more different異なる,
143
383128
3132
人種差別や同性愛嫌悪がひどくなり
異質な人を排除しようとするんです
06:38
then they get more racist人種差別主義者, homophobic同性愛者,
they want to kickキック out the deviants偏差.
144
386284
3523
06:41
So it's in part that you get
an authoritarian権威主義的な reaction反応.
145
389831
2907
これが権威主義的な反応の
原因の一部です
06:44
The left, following以下 throughを通して
the Lennonistレノニスト lineライン --
146
392762
2337
左派が追求するのは
レノン的な路線 —
ジョン・レノンの路線ですが
06:47
the Johnジョン Lennonレノン lineライン --
147
395123
1286
彼らは権威主義的な
反応を生み出します
06:48
does things that create作成する
an authoritarian権威主義的な reaction反応.
148
396433
2409
アメリカでは それが
新興右派に 確かに見られます
06:50
We're certainly確かに seeing見る that
in Americaアメリカ with the alt-rightalt-right.
149
398866
2795
イギリスでも
ヨーロッパ全域でもそうです
06:53
We saw it in Britain英国,
we've私たちは seen見た it all over Europeヨーロッパ.
150
401685
2582
06:56
But the more positiveポジティブ part of that
151
404291
2582
ただ そこには
プラスの側面もあって
06:58
is that I think the localistsローカリスト,
or the nationalistsナショナリスト, are actually実際に right --
152
406897
4297
それは 地域主義者や
民族主義者が 実は正しくて
07:03
that, if you emphasize強調する
our cultural文化的 similarity類似性,
153
411218
3787
文化的な共通性を強調すれば
07:07
then raceレース doesn't actually実際に
matter問題 very much.
154
415029
2227
人種は さほど重要では
なくなるという点です
07:09
So an assimilationist同化者
approachアプローチ to immigration移民
155
417280
2708
だから移民に対する
同化主義的なアプローチで
問題の大半が解消できます
07:12
removes除去する a lot of these problems問題.
156
420012
1557
もし寛容な福祉国家の価値を
強調するのであれば
07:13
And if you value having持つ
a generous寛大な welfare福祉 state状態,
157
421593
2387
07:16
you've got to emphasize強調する
that we're all the same同じ.
158
424004
2473
「みんな同じ」という点を
強調する必要があるんです
07:18
CACA: OK, so rising上昇する immigration移民
and fears恐怖 about that
159
426840
3094
クリス:移民の増加と
そこからくる恐怖の高まりが
現在の対立の原因の1つなんですね
07:21
are one of the causes原因
of the current現在 divide分ける.
160
429958
3167
07:25
What are other causes原因?
161
433149
1713
他に原因はありますか?
07:26
JHJH: The next principle原理 of moral道徳 psychology心理学
162
434886
2021
ジョナサン:道徳心理学の
もう1つの原理とは
07:28
is that intuitions直感 come first,
strategic戦略的 reasoning推論 second二番.
163
436931
3803
直感が優先され
戦略的思考はその後 ということです
07:32
You've probably多分 heard聞いた
the term期間 "motivated意欲的な reasoning推論"
164
440758
2480
「動機付けられた推論」や
「確証バイアス」という言葉を
07:35
or "confirmation確認 biasバイアス."
165
443262
1607
聞いたことがあると思います
07:36
There's some really interesting面白い work
166
444893
1917
とても面白い研究がいくつかあって
我々の知性や言語能力が
進化してきたのは
07:38
on how our high高い intelligenceインテリジェンス
and our verbal口頭 abilities能力
167
446834
3077
07:41
mightかもしれない have evolved進化した
not to help us find out the truth真実,
168
449935
3202
真理を見つけるためではなく
相手を操作し 自分の名誉を
守るためかもしれないというんです
07:45
but to help us manipulate操作する each other,
defend守る our reputation評判 ...
169
453161
2972
人間は 自分を正当化するのが
すごく得意です
07:48
We're really, really good
at justifying正当化する ourselves自分自身.
170
456157
2966
07:51
And when you bring持参する
groupグループ interests関心 into accountアカウント,
171
459147
2367
そして集団の利益が問題になって
07:53
so it's not just me,
it's my teamチーム versus your teamチーム,
172
461538
2737
自分一人ではなく
自分のチーム対相手チームの場合
07:56
whereas一方、 if you're evaluating評価する evidence証拠
that your side is wrong違う,
173
464299
2913
仮に証拠を検討して
自分たちが間違っていても
07:59
we just can't accept受け入れる that.
174
467236
1757
それを認められないんです
08:01
So this is why you can't win勝つ
a political政治的 argument引数.
175
469017
2717
だから政治的な議論に
勝つことはできません
議論しても
08:03
If you're debating議論する something,
176
471758
1493
08:05
you can't persuade説得する the person
with reasons理由 and evidence証拠,
177
473275
3047
論理や証拠で
人は説得できないからです
08:08
because that's not
the way reasoning推論 works作品.
178
476346
2345
理性は そういう風には
働かないのですから
08:10
So now, give us the internetインターネット,
give us GoogleGoogle:
179
478715
3115
例えば インターネットや
Googleを使うとしましょう
08:14
"I heard聞いた that Barackバラク Obamaオバマ
was bornうまれた in Kenyaケニア.
180
482522
2730
「オバマ大統領は
ケニア生まれらしいよ
08:17
Let me GoogleGoogle that -- oh my God!
10 million百万 hitsヒット! Look, he was!"
181
485276
3948
検索しよう … 1千万件!やっぱり!」
こうなるんです
08:21
CACA: So this has come as an unpleasant不快
surprise驚き to a lot of people.
182
489248
3140
クリス:それがショッキングだと
感じる人も多いでしょう
テクノロジー楽観主義者は
人々を結びつける強力な手段として
08:24
Socialソーシャル mediaメディア has oftenしばしば been framed額入り
by techno-optimistsテクノオプティマリスト
183
492412
2848
08:27
as this great connecting接続する force
that would bring持参する people together一緒に.
184
495284
5247
ソーシャルメディアを
作り上げてきたのですから
でも そこには思いがけない
反作用があったんですね
08:32
And there have been some
unexpected予想外の counter-effects反作用 to that.
185
500555
3922
08:36
JHJH: That's right.
186
504922
1151
ジョナサン:その通りです
だから私は 人間性や
左右の対立を
08:38
That's why I'm very enamored魅惑的な
of yin-yang陰陽 views再生回数
187
506097
2381
陰陽的に捉えることに
惹かれるんです
08:40
of human人間 nature自然 and left-right左右 --
188
508502
1618
どちらの側も ある面では正しい反面
08:42
that each side is right
about certainある things,
189
510144
2466
08:44
but then it goes行く blindブラインド to other things.
190
512634
2121
他の面には目を向けなくなります
08:46
And so the left generally一般的に believes信じる
that human人間 nature自然 is good:
191
514779
2978
一般的に左派は
人間の本質は善であり
人々が団結して壁を壊せば
なんでもうまくいくと信じます
08:49
bring持参する people together一緒に, knockノック down
the walls and all will be well.
192
517781
3165
右派 ― リバタリアンではなく
社会保守主義のことですが
08:52
The right -- socialソーシャル conservatives保守派,
not libertarians自由主義者 --
193
520970
2558
一般的に社会保守主義者は
人間は欲深く
08:55
socialソーシャル conservatives保守派 generally一般的に
believe people can be greedy貪欲
194
523552
4253
性的で自己中心的
08:59
and sexual性的 and selfish利己的,
195
527829
1382
09:01
and we need regulation規制,
and we need restrictions制限.
196
529235
2420
だから規制や制約が必要だと
信じています
09:04
So, yeah, if you knockノック down all the walls,
197
532214
2402
壁をすべて取り払って
09:06
allow許す people to communicate通信する
all over the world世界,
198
534640
2229
世界中でコミュニケーションを
とれるようにしてしまうと
ポルノや人種差別があふれると言うのです
09:08
you get a lot of pornポルノ and a lot of racism人種差別主義.
199
536893
2058
クリス:もう少し説明してください
09:10
CACA: So help us understandわかる.
200
538975
1261
そういう人間性の原理は
今までずっと存在していました
09:12
These principles原則 of human人間 nature自然
have been with us forever永遠に.
201
540260
5552
09:18
What's changedかわった that's deepened深く
this feeling感じ of division分割?
202
546918
4774
では この分裂した感覚が深まったのは
何が変わったからでしょう?
09:24
JHJH: You have to see six6 to ten
different異なる threadsスレッド all coming到来 together一緒に.
203
552360
4656
ジョナサン:6~10の様々な要因が
絡んでいることを理解する必要があります
09:29
I'll just listリスト a coupleカップル of them.
204
557373
1693
その中から いくつか挙げましょう
09:31
So in Americaアメリカ, one of the big大きい --
actually実際に, Americaアメリカ and Europeヨーロッパ --
205
559398
4478
アメリカでは 大きな原因は ―
実はアメリカとヨーロッパ両方ですが
09:35
one of the biggest最大 onesもの is World世界 War戦争 IIII.
206
563900
1913
大きな原因の1つは
第二次世界大戦です
09:37
There's interesting面白い research研究
from Joeジョー Henrichヘンリッチ and othersその他
207
565837
2643
ジョー・ヘンリックらによる
興味深い研究があって
09:40
that says言う if your country was at war戦争,
208
568504
2403
もし かつて自分の国が
戦争を経験し
09:42
especially特に when you were young若い,
209
570931
1557
特に それが若い頃だった場合
09:44
then we testテスト you 30 years later後で
in a commonsコモンズ dilemmaジレンマ
210
572512
3114
30年後に「共有地のジレンマ」や
「囚人のジレンマ」で
テストしてみると
09:47
or a prisoner's捕虜 dilemmaジレンマ,
211
575650
1329
09:49
you're more cooperative協力的.
212
577003
1291
より協力的になっているそうです
09:50
Because of our tribal部族 nature自然, if you're --
213
578983
2873
我々は同族志向なので
もし 自分が…
09:53
my parents were teenagersティーンエイジャー
during World世界 War戦争 IIII,
214
581880
2917
私の両親は
第二次世界大戦の時 十代で
09:56
and they would go out
looking for scrapsスクラップ of aluminumアルミニウム
215
584821
2561
戦争に協力するために
アルミくずを探しに
09:59
to help the war戦争 effort努力.
216
587406
1189
よく出かけていました
10:00
I mean, everybodyみんな pulled引っ張られた together一緒に.
217
588619
2178
誰もが協力していたんです
10:02
And so then these people go on,
218
590821
1529
その後 そういう人々が
10:04
they rise上昇 up throughを通して businessビジネス
and government政府,
219
592374
2398
ビジネスや政治の場で出世し
10:06
they take leadershipリーダーシップ positionsポジション.
220
594796
1631
リーダーの立場になりました
10:08
They're really good
at compromise妥協 and cooperation協力.
221
596451
3251
彼らは和解や協力に長けていました
10:11
They all retire引退する by the '90s.
222
599726
1935
そして90年台には みんな引退し
10:13
So we're left with baby赤ちゃん boomersブーマー
by the end終わり of the '90s.
223
601685
3301
90年台の終わりに 残されたのは
ベビーブーマーでした
10:17
And their彼らの youth若者 was spent過ごした fighting戦う
each other within以内 each country,
224
605010
3967
彼らは 若い頃
国内で争って過ごしました
10:21
in 1968 and afterwardsその後.
225
609001
1647
1968年以降のことです
10:22
The loss損失 of the World世界 War戦争 IIII generation世代,
"The Greatest最大 Generation世代,"
226
610672
3994
第二次世界大戦世代 すなわち
「最高の世代」を失った影響は
かなり大きいんです
10:26
is huge巨大.
227
614690
1284
10:28
So that's one.
228
616567
1175
これが1つ目の原因です
10:30
Anotherもう一つ, in Americaアメリカ,
is the purification精製 of the two partiesパーティー.
229
618440
3123
もう1つは アメリカにおける
2大政党の純化です
かつてはリベラルな共和党員や
保守的な民主党員がいました
10:33
There used to be liberalリベラル Republicans共和党
and conservative保守的な Democrats民主党.
230
621949
3047
10:37
So Americaアメリカ had a mid-中期的には、20thth century世紀
that was really bipartisan超党派.
231
625020
3167
20世紀中頃のアメリカは
超党派的だったんです
10:40
But because of a variety品種 of factors要因
that started開始した things moving動く,
232
628211
4367
ところが 状況を変える
様々な要因があって
90年台には 純粋にリベラルな党や
保守的な党になっていきました
10:44
by the 90's〜の, we had a purified精製された
liberalリベラル partyパーティー and conservative保守的な partyパーティー.
233
632602
3398
10:48
So now, the people in eitherどちらか partyパーティー
really are different異なる,
234
636024
2645
今では 両党の人々は
まったく違っていて
対立する党の子供同士の
結婚に反対するほどですが
10:50
and we really don't want
our children子供 to marry結婚する them,
235
638693
2483
60年台には
大した問題ではなかったんです
10:53
whichどの, in the '60s,
didn't matter問題 very much.
236
641200
2068
これが政党の純化です
10:55
So, the purification精製 of the partiesパーティー.
237
643292
1797
10:57
Third三番 is the internetインターネット and, as I said,
238
645113
2472
3つ目はインターネットですが
先ほど言ったように
10:59
it's just the most最も amazing素晴らしい stimulant刺激
for post-hocポストホック reasoning推論 and demonization悪魔化.
239
647609
4683
因果の誤りや 相手を貶める態度を
非常に強く誘発します
11:04
CACA: The toneトーン of what's happeningハプニング
on the internetインターネット now is quiteかなり troubling厄介な.
240
652316
4792
クリス:今のネット上の
雰囲気を見ると とても不安になります
11:09
I just did a quickクイック searchサーチ
on TwitterTwitter about the election選挙
241
657132
2847
今回の選挙について
ちょっとTwitterを検索したら
11:12
and saw two tweetsつぶやき next to each other.
242
660003
2920
こんな2つのツイートが並びました
11:15
One, againstに対して a picture画像 of racist人種差別主義者 graffiti落書き:
243
663335
4212
1つは差別的な落書きを背景にして
11:20
"This is disgusting嫌な!
244
668007
1633
「ムカつく!
11:21
Uglinessうずまき in this country,
brought持ってきた to us by #Trumpトランプ."
245
669664
3170
トランプがもたらした
醜いアメリカの姿」
11:25
And then the next one is:
246
673424
1382
その隣にあるのは
11:27
"Crooked曲がった Hillaryヒラリー
dedication献身 pageページ. Disgusting嫌な!"
247
675339
3303
「犯罪者ヒラリーへの寄付サイト
ムカつく!」
11:31
So this ideaアイディア of "disgust嫌悪"
is troubling厄介な to me.
248
679176
4207
この「ムカつく」という感情に
胸騒ぎを覚えます
11:35
Because you can have an argument引数
or a disagreement不一致 about something,
249
683407
3235
というのも
議論や 意見の不一致や
11:38
you can get angry怒っている at someone誰か.
250
686666
1561
誰かに腹を立てることは
あってもいいでしょうが
11:41
Disgust嫌悪, I've heard聞いた you say,
takes things to a much deeperもっと深く levelレベル.
251
689094
3593
嫌悪感は あなたの言う通り
事態が深刻化する原因だからです
11:44
JHJH: That's right. Disgust嫌悪 is different異なる.
252
692711
1887
ジョナサン:そうです
嫌悪感は別ものです
怒りとは…
私には子供がいますが
11:46
Anger怒り -- you know, I have kids子供たち.
253
694622
1963
11:48
They fight戦い 10 times a day,
254
696609
1750
みんな毎日10回は喧嘩し
11:50
and they love each other 30 times a day.
255
698383
1967
毎日30回は仲良くしています
11:52
You just go back and forth前進:
you get angry怒っている, you're not angry怒っている;
256
700374
2910
これは単なる気分の変化です
怒っては おさまり —
怒っては おさまり と
11:55
you're angry怒っている, you're not angry怒っている.
257
703308
1523
でも嫌悪感は別です
11:56
But disgust嫌悪 is different異なる.
258
704855
1310
嫌悪感は 相手を
人間でない怪物のような
11:58
Disgust嫌悪 paints塗料 the person
as subhuman卑劣な, monstrous怪物,
259
706189
4473
道徳面で異形の存在へと
変えてしまいます
12:02
deformed変形した, morally道徳的に deformed変形した.
260
710686
1809
12:04
Disgust嫌悪 is like indelible消えない inkインク.
261
712519
2424
嫌悪は まるで
消えないインクのようです
12:07
There's research研究 from Johnジョン Gottmanゴットマン
on marital結婚する therapy治療.
262
715768
3515
ジョン・ゴットマンによる
夫婦療法の研究があります
12:11
If you look at the faces -- if one
of the coupleカップル showsショー disgust嫌悪 or contempt軽蔑,
263
719307
5125
表情を見て カップルの片方が
嫌悪や軽蔑を示したら
12:16
that's a predictorプレディクタ that they're going
to get divorced離婚した soonすぐに,
264
724456
3096
それは2人が
すぐ離婚する兆候ですが
12:19
whereas一方、 if they showショー anger怒り,
that doesn't predict予測する anything,
265
727576
2899
怒りを示したとしても
何かを予測できるわけではありません
うまくコントロールすれば
怒りは 実は良いものだからです
12:22
because if you deal対処 with anger怒り well,
it actually実際に is good.
266
730499
2709
この点で今回の選挙は異質です
12:25
So this election選挙 is different異なる.
267
733232
1452
ドナルド・トランプは
よく「ムカつく」と言いますが
12:26
Donaldドナルド Trumpトランプ personally個人的に
uses用途 the wordワード "disgust嫌悪" a lot.
268
734708
3654
12:30
He's very germ-sensitive生殖敏感な,
so disgust嫌悪 does matter問題 a lot --
269
738386
2857
彼は極めて潔癖なので
嫌悪感には大きな意味があります
12:33
more for him, that's something
uniqueユニークな to him --
270
741267
3910
彼にとっては とても重要だし
彼の特徴でもあります
12:37
but as we demonizeデモンストレーションする each other more,
271
745201
2903
ただ これ以上
我々が互いに貶め合えば
12:40
and again, throughを通して
the Manichaeanマニチャーン worldview世界観,
272
748128
3409
二元論的な世界観を通して
12:43
the ideaアイディア that the world世界
is a battle戦い betweenの間に good and evil悪の
273
751561
2730
世界は善と悪との
戦いであるという見方が
高まっていき それにつれて
12:46
as this has been rampingランピング up,
274
754315
1347
12:47
we're more likelyおそらく not just to say
they're wrong違う or I don't like them,
275
755686
3326
単に相手が悪いとか
気に入らないと言うだけでなく
相手が邪悪だ 悪魔だ
12:51
but we say they're evil悪の, they're satanic悪魔的な,
276
759036
2536
ムカつく 吐き気がすると
言うようになり
12:53
they're disgusting嫌な, they're revolting反乱.
277
761596
1921
12:55
And then we want nothing to do with them.
278
763541
2866
相手と関わりたくないと
思うようになります
12:58
And that's why I think we're seeing見る it,
for example, on campusキャンパス now.
279
766806
3487
だから そういう状況を今
例えば大学で目にするんでしょう
13:02
We're seeing見る more the urge衝動
to keep people off campusキャンパス,
280
770317
2640
大学から人々を締め出し
黙らせ 遠ざけようとする衝動を
13:04
silence沈黙 them, keep them away.
281
772981
1945
目にすることが増えています
13:06
I'm afraid恐れ that this whole全体
generation世代 of young若い people,
282
774950
2595
私が恐れているのは
若者世代全体が
初めて政治に関わる時に
嫌悪感を持ってしまうと
13:09
if their彼らの introduction前書き to politics政治
involves関係する a lot of disgust嫌悪,
283
777569
3793
13:13
they're not going to want to be involved関係する
in politics政治 as they get olderより古い.
284
781386
3705
年を取ってからも 政治に
関わろうとしなくなることです
13:17
CACA: So how do we deal対処 with that?
285
785506
1840
クリス:どう対処したらいいでしょう?
13:19
Disgust嫌悪. How do you defuse解散する disgust嫌悪?
286
787370
4480
嫌悪感を どうやって
解消したらいいでしょう?
13:24
JHJH: You can't do it with reasons理由.
287
792874
1948
ジョナサン:理性では解消できません
13:27
I think ...
288
795312
1191
私は…
13:30
I studied研究した disgust嫌悪 for manyたくさんの years,
and I think about emotions感情 a lot.
289
798257
3217
長年 嫌悪感を研究し
感情について考えてきましたが
13:33
And I think that the opposite反対の
of disgust嫌悪 is actually実際に love.
290
801498
3525
嫌悪感の反対は
実は「愛」だと思っています
13:37
Love is all about, like ...
291
805764
3091
愛というのは…
13:41
Disgust嫌悪 is closing閉鎖 off, borders国境.
292
809239
2571
嫌悪感とは遮断であり境界線です
13:43
Love is about dissolving溶解する walls.
293
811834
2545
愛は壁をなくすことです
13:47
So personal個人的 relationships関係, I think,
294
815074
2480
だから個人的な関係こそが
13:49
are probably多分 the most最も
powerful強力な means手段 we have.
295
817578
2759
たぶん私たちが持つ
最強の手段だと思います
13:53
You can be disgusted嫌な by a groupグループ of people,
296
821291
2697
集団に対しては嫌悪感を
覚えるかもしれませんが
13:56
but then you meet会う a particular特に person
297
824012
1918
個人的に触れ合うと
13:57
and you genuinely真に discover発見する
that they're lovely美しい.
298
825954
2776
愛すべき人々だと
気づくんです
14:00
And then gradually徐々に that chipsチップ away
or changes変更 your categoryカテゴリー as well.
299
828754
4296
そんな経験が重なると 人を分類する
カテゴリーも少しずつ崩れ 変化します
14:06
The tragedy悲劇 is, Americansアメリカ人 used to be
much more mixed混合 up in the their彼らの towns
300
834016
5977
悲劇なのは かつてアメリカ人は
地域の中で左右の立場や政治信条が
14:12
by left-right左右 or politics政治.
301
840017
2134
もっと混ざり合っていたはずです
14:14
And now that it's become〜になる
this great moral道徳 divide分ける,
302
842175
2331
でも道徳的分裂が強まった今
政治的に似た者同士が
集まりつつあるという
14:16
there's a lot of evidence証拠
that we're moving動く to be near近く people
303
844530
3143
証拠がたくさんあります
14:19
who are like us politically政治的に.
304
847697
1512
反対派を見つけるのが
難しくなっているんです
14:21
It's harderもっと強く to find somebody誰か
who'sだれの on the other side.
305
849233
2530
14:23
So they're over there, they're far遠い away.
306
851787
2290
相手は遠く離れたところにいて
14:26
It's harderもっと強く to get to know them.
307
854101
1570
知り合うのは難しくなっています
クリス:アメリカ国民や
人々全体に対して あなたが伝えたいこと
14:27
CACA: What would you say to someone誰か
or say to Americansアメリカ人,
308
855695
4224
クリス:アメリカ国民や
人々全体に対して あなたが伝えたいこと
14:31
people generally一般的に,
309
859943
1158
この本能的「嫌悪」を
少しでも考え直すために役立つ
14:33
about what we should understandわかる
about each other
310
861125
2609
14:35
that mightかもしれない help us rethink再考する for a minute
311
863758
3475
私たちが相互に
理解すべきこととは
14:39
this "disgust嫌悪" instinct本能?
312
867257
2203
何でしょう?
14:42
JHJH: Yes.
313
870086
1152
ジョナサン:そうですね
14:43
A really important重要
thing to keep in mindマインド --
314
871262
2153
忘れてはならない
重要なことがあります
14:45
there's research研究 by political政治的
scientist科学者 Alanアラン Abramowitzアブラモウィッツ,
315
873439
4716
政治学者アラン・アブラモウィッツの
研究によれば
14:50
showing表示 that Americanアメリカ人 democracy民主主義
is increasinglyますます governed支配
316
878179
3993
アメリカの民主主義は
「否定的党派性」と呼ばれるものに
14:54
by what's calledと呼ばれる "negative partisanship党派."
317
882196
2243
支配されつつあることが
明らかになっています
14:56
That means手段 you think,
OK there's a candidate候補者,
318
884875
3111
つまり みんな
自分の意思で候補を見出し
その人物を気に入って
投票していると思っています
15:00
you like the candidate候補者,
you vote投票 for the candidate候補者.
319
888010
2406
ところがネガティブ・キャンペーンや
15:02
But with the rise上昇 of negative advertising広告
320
890440
2059
ソーシャルメディアや
その他の流行とともに
15:04
and socialソーシャル mediaメディア
and all sortsソート of other trendsトレンド,
321
892523
2224
15:06
increasinglyますます, the way elections選挙 are done完了
322
894771
2041
選挙のやり方は次第に変化していて
15:08
is that each side tries試行する to make
the other side so horrible恐ろしい, so awful補うステまにくるににステまし補うま,
323
896836
3981
両陣営とも 相手を不快で最悪な存在に
仕立て上げるので
15:12
that you'llあなたは vote投票 for my guy by defaultデフォルト.
324
900841
2041
有権者は 自動的に
支持する候補に投票します
15:15
And so as we more and more vote投票
againstに対して the other side
325
903319
2970
我々が投じるのは
対立候補への反対票であって
15:18
and not for our side,
326
906313
1331
自分側への賛成票ではありません
15:19
you have to keep in mindマインド
that if people are on the left,
327
907668
5507
忘れていけないことですが
左派の人々なら こう考えます
15:25
they think, "Well, I used to think
that Republicans共和党 were bad悪い,
328
913199
2910
「ずっと共和党員は
悪だと思ってきたが
15:28
but now Donaldドナルド Trumpトランプ proves証明する it.
329
916133
1483
今やトランプが
それを証明している
15:29
And now everyすべて Republican共和党,
I can paintペイント with all the things
330
917640
2851
だからトランプに対する見方を
共和党員 全員に
15:32
that I think about Trumpトランプ."
331
920515
1382
結びつけていいはずだ」
15:33
And that's not necessarily必ずしも true真実.
332
921921
1593
でも そうとは限りません
15:35
They're generally一般的に not very happyハッピー
with their彼らの candidate候補者.
333
923538
2692
人々は大抵 支持する候補に
満足していません
今回はアメリカ史上 最も
否定的党派性が色濃い選挙です
15:38
This is the most最も negative partisanship党派
election選挙 in Americanアメリカ人 history歴史.
334
926254
4716
15:43
So you have to first separate別々の
your feelings感情 about the candidate候補者
335
931860
3363
だから 候補者に対する感情と
候補を選ぶ立場である —
15:47
from your feelings感情 about the people
who are given与えられた a choice選択.
336
935247
2937
有権者への感情とは
分けなければならないし
15:50
And then you have to realize実現する that,
337
938208
2483
また そのことに気づく必要があります
15:53
because we all liveライブ
in a separate別々の moral道徳 world世界 --
338
941246
2420
我々は道徳的に分裂した世界に
生きているからです
15:55
the metaphor隠喩 I use in the book
is that we're all trappedトラップされた in "The Matrixマトリックス,"
339
943690
3451
私が本で使った比喩だと
みんな『マトリックス』に囚われているか
15:59
or each moral道徳 communityコミュニティ is a matrixマトリックス,
a consensual合意 hallucination幻覚.
340
947165
3524
道徳的コミュニティー自体が
マトリックス つまり共同幻影なんです
16:02
And so if you're within以内 the blue matrixマトリックス,
341
950713
2243
仮に 民主党支持の
青いマトリックスの中にいたら
16:04
everything'sすべての completely完全に compelling説得力のある
that the other side --
342
952980
3194
説得力のあるものばかりです
相手側が —
16:08
they're troglodytes血栓症, they're racists人種差別主義者,
they're the worst最悪 people in the world世界,
343
956198
3631
原始的で 人種差別主義者で
世界で最悪の人間だという
証拠は全部 揃っている
そう思い込みます
16:11
and you have all the facts事実
to back that up.
344
959853
2104
16:13
But somebody誰か in the next house from yoursあなたの
345
961981
2275
でも隣の家の人は
別の道徳的マトリックスにいます
16:16
is living生活 in a different異なる moral道徳 matrixマトリックス.
346
964280
2033
16:18
They liveライブ in a different異なる videoビデオ gameゲーム,
347
966337
1947
別のテレビゲームの中で
暮らしていて
16:20
and they see a completely完全に
different異なる setセット of facts事実.
348
968308
2378
見ている事実は まったく異なります
16:22
And each one sees見える
different異なる threats脅威 to the country.
349
970710
2676
それぞれ違うものを
国の脅威と考えます
16:25
And what I've found見つけた
from beingであること in the middle中間
350
973410
2090
私が中道という立場から
16:27
and trying試す to understandわかる bothどちらも sides両側
is: bothどちらも sides両側 are right.
351
975524
2927
双方を理解しようとしてわかったのは
どちらも正しいということです
16:30
There are a lot of threats脅威
to this country,
352
978475
2120
この国には 多くの脅威がありますが
どちらの陣営も 構造上
すべてを見渡すことはできないんです
16:32
and each side is constitutionally憲法上
incapable不可能な of seeing見る them all.
353
980619
3485
16:36
CACA: So, are you saying言って
that we almostほぼ need a new新しい typeタイプ of empathy共感?
354
984963
6519
クリス:ということは 新しい種類の
共感が必要だと言うことですか?
16:43
Empathy共感 is traditionally伝統的に framed額入り as:
355
991506
2170
共感とは伝統的に こう定義されます
16:45
"Oh, I feel your pain痛み.
I can put myself私自身 in your shoes."
356
993700
2691
「あなたの痛みや
立場が よくわかる」
16:48
And we apply適用する it to the poor貧しい,
the needy貧しい, the suffering苦しみ.
357
996415
2929
そんな感情を貧しい人や
苦しむ人に当てはめることです
16:52
We don't usually通常 apply適用する it
to people who we feel as other,
358
1000023
3823
でも よそ者だと思う相手や
嫌悪感を覚える人々には
16:55
or we're disgusted嫌な by.
359
1003870
1465
普通 共感しません
16:57
JHJH: No. That's right.
360
1005359
1151
ジョナサン:そう その通りです
16:58
CACA: What would it look like
to buildビルドする that typeタイプ of empathy共感?
361
1006534
4830
クリス:そういう共感を築いたら
どうなるでしょう?
17:04
JHJH: Actually実際に, I think ...
362
1012268
1238
ジョナサン:確かに 私は…
17:06
Empathy共感 is a very, very
hotホット topicトピック in psychology心理学,
363
1014145
2305
共感は心理学では
極めてホットな話題で
17:08
and it's a very popular人気 wordワード
on the left in particular特に.
364
1016474
2658
特に左派には
とても人気のある言葉です
優遇された被差別集団に対する
共感は美徳であり
17:11
Empathy共感 is a good thing, and empathy共感
for the preferred好ましい classesクラス of victims犠牲者.
365
1019156
4000
自分たち左派が
大切だと思う集団に
17:15
So it's important重要 to empathize共感する
366
1023180
1453
17:16
with the groupsグループ that we on the left
think are so important重要.
367
1024657
2824
共感することが
重要だというわけです
17:19
That's easy簡単 to do,
because you get pointsポイント for that.
368
1027505
2531
これは簡単なことです
賞賛されますから
17:22
But empathy共感 really should get you pointsポイント
if you do it when it's hardハード to do.
369
1030442
3649
でも共感しにくい場合こそ
本当の意味で賞賛されるべきです
それから 思うのですが
17:26
And, I think ...
370
1034513
1754
我々は過去50年にも渡って
人種問題や
17:28
You know, we had a long 50-year-年 period期間
of dealing対処する with our raceレース problems問題
371
1036291
5088
17:33
and legal法的 discrimination差別,
372
1041403
2255
法的差別の問題に
取り組んできました
17:35
and that was our top priority優先
for a long time
373
1043682
2187
それらの問題は長い間
一番 優先順位が高く
17:37
and it still is important重要.
374
1045893
1250
今でも重要です
でも今年は
17:39
But I think this year,
375
1047167
1529
17:40
I'm hoping望んでいる it will make people see
376
1048720
2404
存亡の危機が
近づいていることに
17:43
that we have an existential存在
threat脅威 on our hands.
377
1051148
2795
気づいて欲しいと
願っています
17:45
Our left-right左右 divide分ける, I believe,
378
1053967
2667
左右の対立は おそらく
17:48
is by far遠い the most最も important重要
divide分ける we face.
379
1056658
2160
今までで 最も重大な分裂です
17:50
We still have issues問題 about raceレース
and gender性別 and LGBTLGBT,
380
1058842
3031
今も人種やジェンダーや
LGBTの問題はありますが
17:53
but this is the urgent緊急 need
of the next 50 years,
381
1061897
3371
左右の対立こそ
今後50年間の急務ですし
17:57
and things aren'tない going
to get better on their彼らの own自分の.
382
1065292
2861
自然に解消するような
ものではありません
18:01
So we're going to need to do
a lot of institutional制度的 reforms改革,
383
1069021
2835
だから様々な制度改革が
必要でしょうし
18:03
and we could talk about that,
384
1071880
1409
検討もするでしょうが
18:05
but that's like a whole全体 long,
wonky勝つ conversation会話.
385
1073313
2330
それは延々と退屈な会話を
するようなものです
18:07
But I think it starts開始する with people
realizing実現する that this is a turning旋回 pointポイント.
386
1075667
3846
ただ 人々がこの転換点に
気づくことから対話は始まると思います
18:11
And yes, we need a new新しい kind種類 of empathy共感.
387
1079537
2809
だから やはり
新しい共感は必要なんです
18:14
We need to realize実現する:
388
1082370
1505
我々は気づく必要があります
この国に必要なのは共感なんだと
18:15
this is what our country needsニーズ,
389
1083899
1542
18:17
and this is what you need
if you don't want to --
390
1085465
2354
望まないとしても 必要なんです
手をあげてください
今後4年間 —
18:19
Raiseレイズ your handハンド if you want
to spend費やす the next four4つの years
391
1087843
2695
この1年と同じ 怒りと不安を
抱え続けていたい人は 手をあげて
18:22
as angry怒っている and worried心配している as you've been
for the last year -- raise上げる your handハンド.
392
1090562
3486
もし この状況から脱したいなら
18:26
So if you want to escapeエスケープ from this,
393
1094072
1705
18:27
read読む Buddha, read読む Jesusイエス,
read読む Marcusマーカス Aureliusアウレリウス.
394
1095801
2151
ブッダやキリストや
マルクス・アウレリウスを読んでください
18:29
They have all kinds種類 of great advice助言
for how to dropドロップ the fear恐れ,
395
1097976
5062
素晴らしいアドバイスが書いてあります
恐怖を振り払う方法や
見方を変える方法
18:35
reframe再構築する things,
396
1103062
1178
18:36
stop seeing見る other people as your enemy.
397
1104264
2083
他人を敵と見なすのを
止める方法といったアドバイスです
18:38
There's a lot of guidanceガイダンス in ancient古代
wisdom知恵 for this kind種類 of empathy共感.
398
1106371
3307
こういう共感は
過去の叡智にヒントがあるんです
クリス:最後に聞きたいんですが
18:41
CACA: Here'sここにいる my last question質問:
399
1109702
1377
癒しを促すために
我々が個人としてできることは?
18:43
Personally個人的に, what can
people do to help heal癒し?
400
1111103
4335
18:47
JHJH: Yeah, it's very hardハード to just decide決めます
to overcome克服する your deepest最も深い prejudices偏見.
401
1115462
4083
ジョナサン:根深い偏見を克服するのは
かなり難しいことです
18:51
And there's research研究 showing表示
402
1119569
1461
ある調査によると
18:53
that political政治的 prejudices偏見 are deeperもっと深く
and strongerより強く than raceレース prejudices偏見
403
1121054
4349
現在アメリカでは人種への偏見よりも
政治的な偏見の方が
根深くて強固なことが
わかっています
18:57
in the country now.
404
1125427
1260
18:59
So I think you have to make an effort努力 --
that's the mainメイン thing.
405
1127395
3432
だから努力が必要だと思います
これが一番大切です
19:02
Make an effort努力 to actually実際に meet会う somebody誰か.
406
1130851
2004
努力を惜しまず
実際に人に会ってください
19:04
Everybodyみんな has a cousinいとこ, a brother-in-law義兄弟,
407
1132879
2210
誰にだって
いとこや義理の兄弟に
19:07
somebody誰か who'sだれの on the other side.
408
1135113
1869
反対の立場の人がいます
19:09
So, after this election選挙 --
409
1137006
1816
だから この選挙が終わったら
19:11
wait a week週間 or two,
410
1139252
1351
1〜2週間待って —
19:12
because it's probably多分 going to feel
awful補うステまにくるににステまし補うま for one of you --
411
1140627
2836
たぶん ひどい気分になる人も
いるでしょうから —
でも数週間待って
連絡を取り 話がしたいと言うんです
19:15
but wait a coupleカップル weeks, and then
reachリーチ out and say you want to talk.
412
1143487
4152
19:19
And before you do it,
413
1147663
1424
それから 行動する前に
19:21
read読む Daleデール Carnegieカーネギー, "How to Win勝つ
Friends友達 and Influence影響 People" --
414
1149111
3145
デール・カーネギーの
『人を動かす』を読んでください
(笑)
19:24
(Laughter笑い)
415
1152280
1039
真面目に言っているんですよ
19:25
I'm totally完全に serious深刻な.
416
1153343
1167
19:26
You'llあなたは learn学ぶ techniques技術
if you start開始 by acknowledging承認,
417
1154534
2590
テクニックを身に付けるには
相手を受け入れて
19:29
if you start開始 by saying言って,
418
1157148
1161
こう話せばいいんです
19:30
"You know, we don't agree同意する on a lot,
419
1158333
1670
「意見が合わない所も多いけど
ボブおじさんの
尊敬できるところは…」とか
19:32
but one thing I really respect尊敬
about you, Uncle叔父 Bobボブ,"
420
1160027
2538
「保守派の皆さん」と切り出せば
19:34
or "... about you conservatives保守派, is ... "
421
1162589
2059
発見があるはずなんです
19:36
And you can find something.
422
1164672
1334
相手を理解することから始めれば
不思議と効果があるんです
19:38
If you start開始 with some
appreciation感謝, it's like magicマジック.
423
1166030
2763
19:40
This is one of the mainメイン
things I've learned学んだ
424
1168817
2114
これが 私が学び
人間関係に取り入れてきた
大切なことの1つです
19:42
that I take into my human人間 relationships関係.
425
1170955
1913
私は いまだに
つまらない過ちを犯しますが
19:44
I still make lots of stupid愚か mistakes間違い,
426
1172892
1920
19:46
but I'm incredibly信じられないほど good
at apologizing謝罪する now,
427
1174836
2016
今では謝ることや
19:48
and at acknowledging承認 what
somebody誰か was right about.
428
1176876
2417
相手を正しいと認めるのが
上手くなっています
皆さんも そうすれば
19:51
And if you do that,
429
1179317
1154
19:52
then the conversation会話 goes行く really well,
and it's actually実際に really fun楽しい.
430
1180495
3494
会話は すごく上手くいくし
本当に楽しいものなんです
19:56
CACA: Jonジョン, it's absolutely絶対に fascinating魅力的な
speaking話し中 with you.
431
1184717
2645
クリス:ジョン 話していると
本当に興味が尽きません
19:59
It's really does feel like
the ground接地 that we're on
432
1187386
3758
私たちは今
道徳性と人間の本質に関わる
20:03
is a ground接地 populated人口 by deep深い questions質問
of morality道徳 and human人間 nature自然.
433
1191168
4867
深い問いに満ちた
状況にあると 強く感じます
20:08
Your wisdom知恵 couldn'tできなかった be more relevant関連する.
434
1196366
2424
あなたの見識には
本当に大きな意味があります
20:10
Thank you so much for sharing共有
this time with us.
435
1198814
2295
お付き合いいただき
ありがとうございました
20:13
JHJH: Thanksありがとう, Chrisクリス.
436
1201133
1152
ジョナサン:ありがとう クリス
20:14
JHJH: Thanksありがとう, everyoneみんな.
437
1202309
1161
ジョナサン:みんな ありがとう
20:15
(Applause拍手)
438
1203494
2000
(拍手)
Translated by Kazunori Akashi
Reviewed by Misaki Sato

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Jonathan Haidt - Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral and political creatures.

Why you should listen

By understanding more about our moral psychology and its biases, Jonathan Haidt says we can design better institutions (including companies, universities and democracy itself), and we can learn to be more civil and open-minded toward those who are not on our team.

Haidt is a social psychologist whose research on morality across cultures led to his 2008 TED Talk on the psychological roots of the American culture war, and his 2013 TED Talk on how "common threats can make common ground." In both of those talks he asks, "Can't we all disagree more constructively?" Haidt's 2012 TED Talk explored the intersection of his work on morality with his work on happiness to talk about "hive psychology" -- the ability that humans have to lose themselves in groups pursuing larger projects, almost like bees in a hive. This hivish ability is crucial, he argues, for understanding the origins of morality, politics, and religion. These are ideas that Haidt develops at greater length in his book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion.

Haidt joined New York University Stern School of Business in July 2011. He is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership, based in the Business and Society Program. Before coming to Stern, Professor Haidt taught for 16 years at the University of Virginia in the department of psychology.

Haidt's writings appear frequently in the New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He was named one of the top global thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine and by Prospect magazine. Haidt received a B.A. in Philosophy from Yale University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

More profile about the speaker
Jonathan Haidt | Speaker | TED.com
Chris Anderson - TED Curator
After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Why you should listen

Chris Anderson is the Curator of TED, a nonprofit devoted to sharing valuable ideas, primarily through the medium of 'TED Talks' -- short talks that are offered free online to a global audience.

Chris was born in a remote village in Pakistan in 1957. He spent his early years in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, where his parents worked as medical missionaries, and he attended an American school in the Himalayas for his early education. After boarding school in Bath, England, he went on to Oxford University, graduating in 1978 with a degree in philosophy, politics and economics.

Chris then trained as a journalist, working in newspapers and radio, including two years producing a world news service in the Seychelles Islands.

Back in the UK in 1984, Chris was captivated by the personal computer revolution and became an editor at one of the UK's early computer magazines. A year later he founded Future Publishing with a $25,000 bank loan. The new company initially focused on specialist computer publications but eventually expanded into other areas such as cycling, music, video games, technology and design, doubling in size every year for seven years. In 1994, Chris moved to the United States where he built Imagine Media, publisher of Business 2.0 magazine and creator of the popular video game users website IGN. Chris eventually merged Imagine and Future, taking the combined entity public in London in 1999, under the Future name. At its peak, it published 150 magazines and websites and employed 2,000 people.

This success allowed Chris to create a private nonprofit organization, the Sapling Foundation, with the hope of finding new ways to tackle tough global issues through media, technology, entrepreneurship and, most of all, ideas. In 2001, the foundation acquired the TED Conference, then an annual meeting of luminaries in the fields of Technology, Entertainment and Design held in Monterey, California, and Chris left Future to work full time on TED.

He expanded the conference's remit to cover all topics, including science, business and key global issues, while adding a Fellows program, which now has some 300 alumni, and the TED Prize, which grants its recipients "one wish to change the world." The TED stage has become a place for thinkers and doers from all fields to share their ideas and their work, capturing imaginations, sparking conversation and encouraging discovery along the way.

In 2006, TED experimented with posting some of its talks on the Internet. Their viral success encouraged Chris to begin positioning the organization as a global media initiative devoted to 'ideas worth spreading,' part of a new era of information dissemination using the power of online video. In June 2015, the organization posted its 2,000th talk online. The talks are free to view, and they have been translated into more than 100 languages with the help of volunteers from around the world. Viewership has grown to approximately one billion views per year.

Continuing a strategy of 'radical openness,' in 2009 Chris introduced the TEDx initiative, allowing free licenses to local organizers who wished to organize their own TED-like events. More than 8,000 such events have been held, generating an archive of 60,000 TEDx talks. And three years later, the TED-Ed program was launched, offering free educational videos and tools to students and teachers.

More profile about the speaker
Chris Anderson | Speaker | TED.com