ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Jonathan Haidt - Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral and political creatures.

Why you should listen

By understanding more about our moral psychology and its biases, Jonathan Haidt says we can design better institutions (including companies, universities and democracy itself), and we can learn to be more civil and open-minded toward those who are not on our team.

Haidt is a social psychologist whose research on morality across cultures led to his 2008 TED Talk on the psychological roots of the American culture war, and his 2013 TED Talk on how "common threats can make common ground." In both of those talks he asks, "Can't we all disagree more constructively?" Haidt's 2012 TED Talk explored the intersection of his work on morality with his work on happiness to talk about "hive psychology" -- the ability that humans have to lose themselves in groups pursuing larger projects, almost like bees in a hive. This hivish ability is crucial, he argues, for understanding the origins of morality, politics, and religion. These are ideas that Haidt develops at greater length in his book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion.

Haidt joined New York University Stern School of Business in July 2011. He is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership, based in the Business and Society Program. Before coming to Stern, Professor Haidt taught for 16 years at the University of Virginia in the department of psychology.

Haidt's writings appear frequently in the New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He was named one of the top global thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine and by Prospect magazine. Haidt received a B.A. in Philosophy from Yale University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

More profile about the speaker
Jonathan Haidt | Speaker | TED.com
Chris Anderson - TED Curator
After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Why you should listen

Chris Anderson is the Curator of TED, a nonprofit devoted to sharing valuable ideas, primarily through the medium of 'TED Talks' -- short talks that are offered free online to a global audience.

Chris was born in a remote village in Pakistan in 1957. He spent his early years in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, where his parents worked as medical missionaries, and he attended an American school in the Himalayas for his early education. After boarding school in Bath, England, he went on to Oxford University, graduating in 1978 with a degree in philosophy, politics and economics.

Chris then trained as a journalist, working in newspapers and radio, including two years producing a world news service in the Seychelles Islands.

Back in the UK in 1984, Chris was captivated by the personal computer revolution and became an editor at one of the UK's early computer magazines. A year later he founded Future Publishing with a $25,000 bank loan. The new company initially focused on specialist computer publications but eventually expanded into other areas such as cycling, music, video games, technology and design, doubling in size every year for seven years. In 1994, Chris moved to the United States where he built Imagine Media, publisher of Business 2.0 magazine and creator of the popular video game users website IGN. Chris eventually merged Imagine and Future, taking the combined entity public in London in 1999, under the Future name. At its peak, it published 150 magazines and websites and employed 2,000 people.

This success allowed Chris to create a private nonprofit organization, the Sapling Foundation, with the hope of finding new ways to tackle tough global issues through media, technology, entrepreneurship and, most of all, ideas. In 2001, the foundation acquired the TED Conference, then an annual meeting of luminaries in the fields of Technology, Entertainment and Design held in Monterey, California, and Chris left Future to work full time on TED.

He expanded the conference's remit to cover all topics, including science, business and key global issues, while adding a Fellows program, which now has some 300 alumni, and the TED Prize, which grants its recipients "one wish to change the world." The TED stage has become a place for thinkers and doers from all fields to share their ideas and their work, capturing imaginations, sparking conversation and encouraging discovery along the way.

In 2006, TED experimented with posting some of its talks on the Internet. Their viral success encouraged Chris to begin positioning the organization as a global media initiative devoted to 'ideas worth spreading,' part of a new era of information dissemination using the power of online video. In June 2015, the organization posted its 2,000th talk online. The talks are free to view, and they have been translated into more than 100 languages with the help of volunteers from around the world. Viewership has grown to approximately one billion views per year.

Continuing a strategy of 'radical openness,' in 2009 Chris introduced the TEDx initiative, allowing free licenses to local organizers who wished to organize their own TED-like events. More than 8,000 such events have been held, generating an archive of 60,000 TEDx talks. And three years later, the TED-Ed program was launched, offering free educational videos and tools to students and teachers.

More profile about the speaker
Chris Anderson | Speaker | TED.com
TEDNYC

Jonathan Haidt: Can a divided America heal?

Џонатан Хеит: Дали може поделената Америка да заздравее?

Filmed:
1,864,998 views

Како може САД да закрепне после негативните, претседателски избори во 2016 год.? Социјалниот психолог Џонатан Хеит го проучува моралот кој е во основата на нашите политички избори. Во разговорот со Крис Андерсон, раководителот на ТЕД, Хеит зборува за формите на размислување и историските причини кои доведоа до острата поделеност во Америка при што изнесува визија за можното придвижување на земјата напред.
- Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral and political creatures. Full bio - TED Curator
After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:12
Chris Anderson: So, Jon, this feels scary.
0
936
2200
Крис Андерсон:Џон, ова изгледа страшно.
00:15
Jonathan Haidt: Yeah.
1
3160
1165
Џонатан Хеит: Да.
К.А: Изгледа како светот да е на место
00:16
CA: It feels like the world is in a place
2
4349
1990
00:18
that we haven't seen for a long time.
3
6363
1837
кое не сме го виделе долго време.
00:20
People don't just disagree
in the way that we're familiar with,
4
8224
4561
Луѓето не само што не се согласуваат
на начин кој ни е познат
00:24
on the left-right political divide.
5
12809
1900
во однос на поделбата леви и десни.
00:26
There are much deeper differences afoot.
6
14733
3001
Се јавуваат многу поголеми разлики.
00:29
What on earth is going on,
and how did we get here?
7
17758
3266
Што се случува и како дојдовме до тоа?
00:33
JH: This is different.
8
21048
3003
Џ.Х: Ова е различно.
00:36
There's a much more
apocalyptic sort of feeling.
9
24075
3227
Постои едно поапокалиптично чувство.
00:39
Survey research by Pew Research shows
10
27326
2326
Анкетите на Pew Research покажуваат
00:41
that the degree to which we feel
that the other side is not just --
11
29676
3709
дека не само што не ни се
допаѓа спротивната страна
00:45
we don't just dislike them;
we strongly dislike them,
12
33409
2974
туку премногу не ни се допаѓа,
00:48
and we think that they are
a threat to the nation.
13
36407
3476
и сметаме дека се закана за нацијата.
00:51
Those numbers have been going up and up,
14
39907
1964
Бројките се повеќе одат нагоре
00:53
and those are over 50 percent
now on both sides.
15
41895
2737
и сега се 50% на двете страни.
00:56
People are scared,
16
44656
1151
Луѓето се исплашени
00:57
because it feels like this is different
than before; it's much more intense.
17
45831
3627
зашто чувствуваат дека ова е
поразлично од порано, поинтензивно.
Кога и да погледнам во некоја
општествена загатка
01:01
Whenever I look
at any sort of social puzzle,
18
49482
2520
01:04
I always apply the three basic
principles of moral psychology,
19
52026
3117
секогаш применувам 3 основни принципи
на моралната психологија
01:07
and I think they'll help us here.
20
55167
1894
и мислам дека ќе ни помогнат сега.
01:09
So the first thing that you
have to always keep in mind
21
57085
2733
Првото нешто кое секогаш
треба да се има на ум
01:11
when you're thinking about politics
22
59842
1736
кога се размислува за политика
01:13
is that we're tribal.
23
61602
1380
е тоа дека сме племенски.
01:15
We evolved for tribalism.
24
63006
1523
Еволуиравме племенски.
01:16
One of the simplest and greatest
insights into human social nature
25
64553
3169
Едноставен и извонреден приказ на
човечката социјална природа
01:19
is the Bedouin proverb:
26
67746
1173
е бедуинската поговорка:
01:20
"Me against my brother;
27
68943
1392
„Јас против брат ми;
01:22
me and my brother against our cousin;
28
70359
1927
јас и брат ми против роднините;
01:24
me and my brother and cousins
against the stranger."
29
72310
2502
јас, брат ми и роднините
против странецот.“
01:26
And that tribalism allowed us
to create large societies
30
74836
4724
И тоа племенско ни овозможи
да создадеме големи општества
01:31
and to come together
in order to compete with others.
31
79584
3032
и да се здружуваме со цел да се
натправаруваме со другите.
01:34
That brought us out of the jungle
and out of small groups,
32
82640
3681
Така излеговме од џунглата
и од малите групи,
01:38
but it means that we have
eternal conflict.
33
86345
2023
но тоа значи дека имаме вечен конфликт.
01:40
The question you have to look at is:
34
88392
1741
Треба да се запрашаме следново:
01:42
What aspects of our society
are making that more bitter,
35
90157
2664
Кои аспекти на општеството
го прават поостар конфликтот
01:44
and what are calming them down?
36
92845
1530
а кои го ублажуваат.
01:46
CA: That's a very dark proverb.
37
94399
1561
К.А: Мрачна поговорка.
01:47
You're saying that that's actually
baked into most people's mental wiring
38
95984
4173
Велите дека тоа е всадено во менталниот
склоп кај повеќето луѓе
01:52
at some level?
39
100181
1151
на некој начин?
01:53
JH: Oh, absolutely. This is just
a basic aspect of human social cognition.
40
101356
3804
Џ.Х:Апсолутно. Ова е основниот аспект
на човечката социјална когниција.
Но,ние вистински можеме мирно
да живееме заедно,
01:57
But we can also live together
really peacefully,
41
105184
2323
01:59
and we've invented all kinds
of fun ways of, like, playing war.
42
107531
3395
а ги измисливме сите
видови на играње војна.
02:02
I mean, sports, politics --
43
110950
1382
Пример, спортот,политиката-
02:04
these are all ways that we get
to exercise this tribal nature
44
112356
3695
тоа се начините на кои ја одржуваме
племенската природа
02:08
without actually hurting anyone.
45
116075
1583
без вистински да повредуваме.
02:09
We're also really good at trade
and exploration and meeting new people.
46
117682
4345
Истотака сме добри во трговија,истражување
и запознавање нови луѓе.
02:14
So you have to see our tribalism
as something that goes up or down --
47
122051
3299
Tреба да го гледате племенското
како нешто што оди нагоре или надолу-
02:17
it's not like we're doomed
to always be fighting each other,
48
125374
2852
не како предодреденост
да се бориме едни против други,
02:20
but we'll never have world peace.
49
128250
1850
и никогаш да немаме светски мир.
02:22
CA: The size of that tribe
can shrink or expand.
50
130980
3222
К.А:Големината на племето може
да се намали или зголеми.
02:26
JH: Right.
51
134226
1151
Џ.Х:Точно.
02:27
CA: The size of what we consider "us"
52
135401
1987
К.А:Големината на она што е „НИЕ“
02:29
and what we consider "other" or "them"
53
137412
2421
или „ТИЕ“ или „ДРУГИТЕ“
02:31
can change.
54
139857
2130
може да се промени.
02:34
And some people believed that process
could continue indefinitely.
55
142610
5590
Некои веруват дека тој процес
може да продолжи неограничено.
02:40
JH: That's right.
56
148224
1192
Џ.Х:Така е.
К.А:Навистина ја прошируваме
смислата за племенското.
02:41
CA: And we were indeed expanding
the sense of tribe for a while.
57
149440
3206
02:44
JH: So this is, I think,
58
152670
1161
Џ.Х: Ова е, мислам,
02:45
where we're getting at what's possibly
the new left-right distinction.
59
153855
3355
кон што одиме веројатно, новата поделба
меѓу левичари и десничари.
02:49
I mean, the left-right
as we've all inherited it,
60
157234
2323
Левите и десните како што ги наследивме
02:51
comes out of the labor
versus capital distinction,
61
159581
2839
доаѓаат од поделбата меѓу
трудот и капиталот,
работничката класа, Маркс.
02:54
and the working class, and Marx.
62
162444
2375
02:56
But I think what we're seeing
now, increasingly,
63
164843
2249
Но,мислам она што го гледаме дека расте
02:59
is a divide in all the Western democracies
64
167116
2854
е поделбата во сите западни демократии
03:01
between the people
who want to stop at nation,
65
169994
3707
меѓу луѓето кои сакаат
да запрат кај нацијата,
03:05
the people who are more parochial --
66
173725
1750
луѓето кои се повеќе малограѓански-
03:07
and I don't mean that in a bad way --
67
175499
1797
и не го сметам тоа за негативно-
03:09
people who have much more
of a sense of being rooted,
68
177320
2800
луѓе кои го имат повеќе
чувството на припадност,
03:12
they care about their town,
their community and their nation.
69
180144
3193
се грижат за свиоте градови,
заедници и за нацијата.
03:15
And then those who are
anti-parochial and who --
70
183824
4037
Од другата страна се оние
кои се не-малограѓански-
03:19
whenever I get confused, I just think
of the John Lennon song "Imagine."
71
187885
3400
кои,кога сум збунет, ме потсетуваат
на песната на Ленон „Замисли“.
03:23
"Imagine there's no countries,
nothing to kill or die for."
72
191309
2829
„Замисли да нема држави,
ништо за кое ќе се убива и умира.“
03:26
And so these are the people
who want more global governance,
73
194162
3213
Овие се луѓето кои претпочитаат
глобална управа,
03:29
they don't like nation states,
they don't like borders.
74
197399
2674
не сакаат држави, не сакаат граници.
03:32
You see this all over Europe as well.
75
200097
1825
Го гледата ова низ цела Европа.
03:33
There's a great metaphor guy --
actually, his name is Shakespeare --
76
201946
3226
Има еден метафоричен тип-
всушност се вика Шекспир-
03:37
writing ten years ago in Britain.
77
205196
1581
пишуваше пред 10год во Британија.
03:38
He had a metaphor:
78
206801
1167
Имаше една метафора:
03:39
"Are we drawbridge-uppers
or drawbridge-downers?"
79
207992
3273
„Дали го креваме висечкиот
мост или го спуштаме?“
03:43
And Britain is divided
52-48 on that point.
80
211289
2905
Британија е поделена 52-48 во тој поглед.
03:46
And America is divided on that point, too.
81
214218
2120
И Америка е поделена во таа смисла.
03:49
CA: And so, those of us
who grew up with The Beatles
82
217379
3577
К.А:Ние кои израснавме со Битлси
03:52
and that sort of hippie philosophy
of dreaming of a more connected world --
83
220980
3574
и тој вид на хипи филозофија
на сонување за еден поврзан свет
03:56
it felt so idealistic and "how could
anyone think badly about that?"
84
224578
3841
изгледаше идеалистички и
„како може некој лошо да мисли за тоа?“
04:00
And what you're saying is that, actually,
85
228736
2011
Она што всушност велите е дека
04:02
millions of people today
feel that that isn't just silly;
86
230771
4302
милиони луѓе денес мислат
не само дека е глупаво
04:07
it's actually dangerous and wrong,
and they're scared of it.
87
235097
2861
туку погрешно и опасно и се уплашени.
04:09
JH: I think the big issue, especially
in Europe but also here,
88
237982
3026
Џ.Х:Сметам дек главниот проблем
особено во Европа, но и овде,
04:13
is the issue of immigration.
89
241032
1367
е проблемот на имиграција.
04:14
And I think this is where
we have to look very carefully
90
242423
3069
Тука треба да погледнеме внимателно
04:17
at the social science
about diversity and immigration.
91
245516
3631
во социјалната наука за различноста
и имиграцијата.
04:21
Once something becomes politicized,
92
249171
1714
Нешто штом еднаш се исполитизира,
04:22
once it becomes something
that the left loves and the right --
93
250909
3024
станува нешто што левите
го сакаат и десните-
04:25
then even the social scientists
can't think straight about it.
94
253957
3101
тогаш ни социјалните научници
не можат исправно да размислуваат.
04:29
Now, diversity is good in a lot of ways.
95
257082
1957
Различноста е добра на многу начини.
04:31
It clearly creates more innovation.
96
259063
2207
Може да содава повеќе новитети.
04:33
The American economy
has grown enormously from it.
97
261294
2477
Таа ја зајакна американската економија.
Разликите и имиграцијата се добри.
04:35
Diversity and immigration
do a lot of good things.
98
263795
2382
Но,чинам глобалистите не гледаат,
04:38
But what the globalists,
I think, don't see,
99
266201
2628
или не сакаат да видат е тоа дека
04:40
what they don't want to see,
100
268853
1507
се намалува соработката и довербата
во рамки на општеството.
04:42
is that ethnic diversity
cuts social capital and trust.
101
270384
6278
Има една значајна студија од Р.Путнем,
04:48
There's a very important
study by Robert Putnam,
102
276686
2336
авторот на „Куглање сам“.
04:51
the author of "Bowling Alone,"
103
279046
1856
за податоците на општествениот капитал.
04:52
looking at social capital databases.
104
280926
1855
04:54
And basically, the more people
feel that they are the same,
105
282805
2947
Колку повеќе сметаме дека сме исти,
толку повеќе си веруваме,
04:57
the more they trust each other,
106
285776
1507
и имаме социјална држава на распределба.
04:59
the more they can have
a redistributionist welfare state.
107
287307
2740
Скандинавските земји се прекрасни
05:02
Scandinavian countries are so wonderful
108
290071
1971
зашто имаат традиција на
мали,хомогени држви.
05:04
because they have this legacy
of being small, homogenous countries.
109
292066
3349
Тоа води кон прогресивна социјална држава,
05:07
And that leads to
a progressive welfare state,
110
295439
3717
збир на прогресивни,лево ориентирни
вредности кои велат:
05:11
a set of progressive
left-leaning values, which says,
111
299180
2803
„Спуштете го висечкиот мост долу!
Светот е прекрасно место.
05:14
"Drawbridge down!
The world is a great place.
112
302007
3001
Луѓето во Сирија страдат-
мора да ги примиме“.
05:17
People in Syria are suffering --
we must welcome them in."
113
305032
3032
Тоа е убава работа.
05:20
And it's a beautiful thing.
114
308088
1377
Но,кога (летово бев во Шведска)
05:21
But if, and I was in Sweden
this summer,
115
309934
2583
кога говорот во Шведска е
политички коректен
05:24
if the discourse in Sweden
is fairly politically correct
116
312541
3183
и не зборуват за недостатоци,
05:27
and they can't talk about the downsides,
117
315748
2237
тогаш ќе примите многу луѓе.
05:30
you end up bringing a lot of people in.
118
318009
1987
Тоа ќе ја намали довербата и соработката
05:32
That's going to cut social capital,
119
320020
1692
05:33
it makes it hard to have a welfare state
120
321736
1945
и ќе ја поткопа социјалната држава
и ќе завршат како нас во Америка.,
05:35
and they might end up,
as we have in America,
121
323705
2556
која е јасно видлива расно поделена.
05:38
with a racially divided, visibly
racially divided, society.
122
326285
3613
Ова е многу непријатна тема.
05:41
So this is all very
uncomfortable to talk about.
123
329922
2260
Но,важно е за Европа,и за нас
05:44
But I think this is the thing,
especially in Europe and for us, too,
124
332206
3245
да го имаме предвид.
05:47
we need to be looking at.
125
335475
1193
К.А:Велите дека разумните луѓе,
05:48
CA: You're saying that people of reason,
126
336692
2086
луѓето кои не се сметаат за расисти,
05:50
people who would consider
themselves not racists,
127
338802
2488
05:53
but moral, upstanding people,
128
341314
1727
туку за морални, силни луѓе,
05:55
have a rationale that says
humans are just too different;
129
343065
2946
имаат објаснување дека
луѓето различни;
дека има опасност од прелевање
на човековите способности
05:58
that we're in danger of overloading
our sense of what humans are capable of,
130
346035
5439
06:03
by mixing in people who are too different.
131
351498
2490
со мешање на луѓе кои се различни.
Џ.Х:Да,но можам да го
направам поприфатливо
06:06
JH: Yes, but I can make it
much more palatable
132
354012
3540
06:09
by saying it's not necessarily about race.
133
357576
2798
ако речам дека не се раси во прашање
туку култури.
06:12
It's about culture.
134
360819
1267
06:14
There's wonderful work by a political
scientist named Karen Stenner,
135
362110
4173
Има еден прекрасен труд на
политокологот Карен Стенер
кој покажува дека кога
луѓето имаат чувство
06:18
who shows that when people have a sense
136
366307
3227
06:21
that we are all united,
we're all the same,
137
369558
2235
дека сме сите обединети, еднакви,
06:23
there are many people who have
a predisposition to authoritarianism.
138
371817
3250
има луѓе кои сакаат да се авторитарни.
Тие луѓе не мора да се расисти
06:27
Those people aren't particularly racist
139
375091
2042
ако сметаат дека нема опасност
06:29
when they feel as through
there's not a threat
140
377157
2167
за социјалниот и морален ред.
06:31
to our social and moral order.
141
379348
1699
Но,ако ги подготвите експериментално
06:33
But if you prime them experimentally
142
381071
2033
да мислат дека се делиме
стануваат различни,
06:35
by thinking we're coming apart,
people are getting more different,
143
383128
3132
стануваат расисти,хомофобични и
сакаат да ги отфрлат девијантните.
06:38
then they get more racist, homophobic,
they want to kick out the deviants.
144
386284
3523
Тогаш имате авторитарна реакција.
06:41
So it's in part that you get
an authoritarian reaction.
145
389831
2907
Левите,следејќи ја линијата на Ленон-
06:44
The left, following through
the Lennonist line --
146
392762
2337
06:47
the John Lennon line --
147
395123
1286
Џон Ленон линијата-
06:48
does things that create
an authoritarian reaction.
148
396433
2409
создава авторитарни реакции.
06:50
We're certainly seeing that
in America with the alt-right.
149
398866
2795
Тоа јасно го гледаме во Америка
со алт-десницата.
Го видовме во Бритнија и во цела Европа.
06:53
We saw it in Britain,
we've seen it all over Europe.
150
401685
2582
Најпозитивниот дел кај нив
06:56
But the more positive part of that
151
404291
2582
е дека локалистите или националистите
се всушност во право,
06:58
is that I think the localists,
or the nationalists, are actually right --
152
406897
4297
дека,ако ја истакните културната сличност
07:03
that, if you emphasize
our cultural similarity,
153
411218
3787
тогаш расата не игра улога.
07:07
then race doesn't actually
matter very much.
154
415029
2227
Асимилациониот пристап кон имиграцијата
07:09
So an assimilationist
approach to immigration
155
417280
2708
отстранува многу проблеми со имиграциите.
07:12
removes a lot of these problems.
156
420012
1557
07:13
And if you value having
a generous welfare state,
157
421593
2387
Ако цените да имате великодушна
социјална држава
07:16
you've got to emphasize
that we're all the same.
158
424004
2473
треба да истакните дека сите сме еднакви.
К.А: Зголемената имиграција
и стравот околу неа
07:18
CA: OK, so rising immigration
and fears about that
159
426840
3094
е една од причините за поделеност.
07:21
are one of the causes
of the current divide.
160
429958
3167
07:25
What are other causes?
161
433149
1713
Кои се другите причини?
Џ.Х:Следниот принцип на
моралната психологија
07:26
JH: The next principle of moral psychology
162
434886
2021
е дека прво се јавува интуиција,
а после стратешко расудување.
07:28
is that intuitions come first,
strategic reasoning second.
163
436931
3803
Веројатно сте чуле за терминот
`мотивирачко расудување`
07:32
You've probably heard
the term "motivated reasoning"
164
440758
2480
или `потврдени предрасуди`.
07:35
or "confirmation bias."
165
443262
1607
Постои интересни трудови
07:36
There's some really interesting work
166
444893
1917
за тоа како интелигенцијата
и вербалните способности
07:38
on how our high intelligence
and our verbal abilities
167
446834
3077
можеби еволуирале не за
да ја најдеме вистината
07:41
might have evolved
not to help us find out the truth,
168
449935
3202
туку да манипулираме едни со други,
да се браниме..
07:45
but to help us manipulate each other,
defend our reputation ...
169
453161
2972
Навистина сме добри во
оправдувањето себе си.
07:48
We're really, really good
at justifying ourselves.
170
456157
2966
Кога се во прашање групни интереси,
07:51
And when you bring
group interests into account,
171
459147
2367
07:53
so it's not just me,
it's my team versus your team,
172
461538
2737
тогаш не сум само јас туку
мојот тим наспроти твојот,
07:56
whereas if you're evaluating evidence
that your side is wrong,
173
464299
2913
и ако се види дека сме на погрешна страна
едноставно не го прифаќаме тоа.
07:59
we just can't accept that.
174
467236
1757
Затоа не можете да победите
на политичка расправа.
08:01
So this is why you can't win
a political argument.
175
469017
2717
Ако дебатирате,
08:03
If you're debating something,
176
471758
1493
не можете да убедите со причини и докази
08:05
you can't persuade the person
with reasons and evidence,
177
473275
3047
зашто расудувањето не функционира така.
08:08
because that's not
the way reasoning works.
178
476346
2345
Земете го интернетот или Гугл,
08:10
So now, give us the internet,
give us Google:
179
478715
3115
„Чув дека Барак Обама е роден во Кенија.
08:14
"I heard that Barack Obama
was born in Kenya.
180
482522
2730
08:17
Let me Google that -- oh my God!
10 million hits! Look, he was!"
181
485276
3948
Дај да изгауглам-леле, 10 милиони пати!
Гледај, нвистина бил“.
К.А:Ова дојде како непријатно изненадување
за многумина.
08:21
CA: So this has come as an unpleasant
surprise to a lot of people.
182
489248
3140
Социјалните медиуми секогаш биле
ограничени од техно-оптимистите.
08:24
Social media has often been framed
by techno-optimists
183
492412
2848
08:27
as this great connecting force
that would bring people together.
184
495284
5247
и оваа сврзувачка сила
која ги спојува луѓето.
Имаше и неочекувни контра-ефекти на тоа.
08:32
And there have been some
unexpected counter-effects to that.
185
500555
3922
Џ.Х:Точно.
08:36
JH: That's right.
186
504922
1151
Затоа сум обземен од
овие јин-јан гледишта.
08:38
That's why I'm very enamored
of yin-yang views
187
506097
2381
на човечката природа и леви-десни-
08:40
of human nature and left-right --
188
508502
1618
08:42
that each side is right
about certain things,
189
510144
2466
дека секоја страна е во
прво за одредени нешта
но останува слепа за други работи.
08:44
but then it goes blind to other things.
190
512634
2121
Така левите генерално веруваат
дека човечката природа е добра,
08:46
And so the left generally believes
that human nature is good:
191
514779
2978
08:49
bring people together, knock down
the walls and all will be well.
192
517781
3165
ги спојува луѓето,ќе ги сруши зидовите
и сѐ ќе биде добро.
Десните-конзервативните,
не либертаријанците,
08:52
The right -- social conservatives,
not libertarians --
193
520970
2558
08:55
social conservatives generally
believe people can be greedy
194
523552
4253
социјалните конзервативци генерално
сметаат дека луѓето можат да се алчни
сексуални и себични
08:59
and sexual and selfish,
195
527829
1382
09:01
and we need regulation,
and we need restrictions.
196
529235
2420
и ни требаат регулативи и рестрикции.
Значи, да,ако ги срушите сите зидови
09:04
So, yeah, if you knock down all the walls,
197
532214
2402
дозволите луѓето да комуницираат
низ цел свет
09:06
allow people to communicate
all over the world,
198
534640
2229
ќе имате многу порногрфија и расизам.
09:08
you get a lot of porn and a lot of racism.
199
536893
2058
К.А: Како да го разбереме ова?
09:10
CA: So help us understand.
200
538975
1261
09:12
These principles of human nature
have been with us forever.
201
540260
5552
Овој принцип на човечката природа
отсекогаш бил присутен.
Што се промени и го продлабочи
чувството на поделеност?
09:18
What's changed that's deepened
this feeling of division?
202
546918
4774
Џ.Х: Треба да видите 6-10 различни
моменти кои доаѓаат заедно.
09:24
JH: You have to see six to ten
different threads all coming together.
203
552360
4656
09:29
I'll just list a couple of them.
204
557373
1693
Ќе набројам само неколку.
09:31
So in America, one of the big --
actually, America and Europe --
205
559398
4478
Во Америка, една од најголемите,
всушност во Америка и Европа,
09:35
one of the biggest ones is World War II.
206
563900
1913
еден од најголемите е II-та Светска Војна
09:37
There's interesting research
from Joe Henrich and others
207
565837
2643
Има една интересна студија
на Џо Хенрик и други
09:40
that says if your country was at war,
208
568504
2403
која вели дека ако земјата е во војна,
09:42
especially when you were young,
209
570931
1557
особено кога сте млад,
и ве тестираме 30 год.подоцна
во социјална дилема
09:44
then we test you 30 years later
in a commons dilemma
210
572512
3114
или затворска дилема,
09:47
or a prisoner's dilemma,
211
575650
1329
вие ќе сте посоработлив.
09:49
you're more cooperative.
212
577003
1291
Поради нашата племенска природа,ако сте
09:50
Because of our tribal nature, if you're --
213
578983
2873
моите родители беа тинејџери
во II-та Светска Војна
09:53
my parents were teenagers
during World War II,
214
581880
2917
и одеа да бараат парчиња алуминиум
09:56
and they would go out
looking for scraps of aluminum
215
584821
2561
за да помогнат во воени цели.
09:59
to help the war effort.
216
587406
1189
Значи, секој придонесувал.
10:00
I mean, everybody pulled together.
217
588619
2178
Така овие луѓе продолжуваат,
растат низ бизнисот и влста,
10:02
And so then these people go on,
218
590821
1529
добиваат водечки позиции.
10:04
they rise up through business
and government,
219
592374
2398
10:06
they take leadership positions.
220
594796
1631
Тие се навистина добри во
компромиси и соработка.
10:08
They're really good
at compromise and cooperation.
221
596451
3251
Сите тие се пензионирани до 90-те.
10:11
They all retire by the '90s.
222
599726
1935
10:13
So we're left with baby boomers
by the end of the '90s.
223
601685
3301
Така до 90-те останавме со
генерацијата бејби бумерс.
10:17
And their youth was spent fighting
each other within each country,
224
605010
3967
Тие ја поминаа младоста во борба
едни против други во сите земји
во 1968 и понатаму.
10:21
in 1968 and afterwards.
225
609001
1647
10:22
The loss of the World War II generation,
"The Greatest Generation,"
226
610672
3994
Загубата на генерацијата
од II-та Светска Војна,
е огромна.
10:26
is huge.
227
614690
1284
Тоа е едно.
10:28
So that's one.
228
616567
1175
Друго, во Америка имаме прочистување
на двете партии.
10:30
Another, in America,
is the purification of the two parties.
229
618440
3123
Имваме либерални републиканци
и конзервативни демократи.
10:33
There used to be liberal Republicans
and conservative Democrats.
230
621949
3047
10:37
So America had a mid-20th century
that was really bipartisan.
231
625020
3167
Америка имаше двопартиски
систем во средината на 20 век.
10:40
But because of a variety of factors
that started things moving,
232
628211
4367
Поради разни фактори кои
го започнаа ова движење,
до 90-те, имавме прочистена либерална
партија и конзервативна партија.
10:44
by the 90's, we had a purified
liberal party and conservative party.
233
632602
3398
10:48
So now, the people in either party
really are different,
234
636024
2645
Сега луѓето во обете партии се различни,
10:50
and we really don't want
our children to marry them,
235
638693
2483
и не сакаме нашите деца
да се земаат со нив,
што во 60-те не значеше многу.
10:53
which, in the '60s,
didn't matter very much.
236
641200
2068
Значи, прочистувањето на партиите.
10:55
So, the purification of the parties.
237
643292
1797
Трето е интернетот, и како што реков,
10:57
Third is the internet and, as I said,
238
645113
2472
најчудесниот стимуланс за
расудувањето и демонизацијата.
10:59
it's just the most amazing stimulant
for post-hoc reasoning and demonization.
239
647609
4683
11:04
CA: The tone of what's happening
on the internet now is quite troubling.
240
652316
4792
К.А: Призвукот на она што сега се случува
на интернет е загрижувачки.
11:09
I just did a quick search
on Twitter about the election
241
657132
2847
Истражував малку на Твитер околу изборите
11:12
and saw two tweets next to each other.
242
660003
2920
и видов два твита еден до друг.
11:15
One, against a picture of racist graffiti:
243
663335
4212
Еден, наспроти слика
на расистички графит:
11:20
"This is disgusting!
244
668007
1633
„Ова е одвратно!“
Грдотија во земјата донесена од # Трумп.“
11:21
Ugliness in this country,
brought to us by #Trump."
245
669664
3170
А следниот:
11:25
And then the next one is:
246
673424
1382
„Извитоперената страна на Хилари.
Одвратно!“
11:27
"Crooked Hillary
dedication page. Disgusting!"
247
675339
3303
11:31
So this idea of "disgust"
is troubling to me.
248
679176
4207
Идејата за `одвратност` ме вознемирува.
Можете да имате расправа или
несогласување за нешто,
11:35
Because you can have an argument
or a disagreement about something,
249
683407
3235
11:38
you can get angry at someone.
250
686666
1561
можете да се налутите на некого.
Одвратноста, велите се
случува подлабоко.
11:41
Disgust, I've heard you say,
takes things to a much deeper level.
251
689094
3593
11:44
JH: That's right. Disgust is different.
252
692711
1887
Џ.Х:Точно.Одвратноста е различно нешто.
11:46
Anger -- you know, I have kids.
253
694622
1963
Лутина-знаете, имам деца.
Се караат 10 пати дневно.,
11:48
They fight 10 times a day,
254
696609
1750
и се сакаат 30 пати дневно.
11:50
and they love each other 30 times a day.
255
698383
1967
Одите напред назад, се лутите,
не се лутите;
11:52
You just go back and forth:
you get angry, you're not angry;
256
700374
2910
лути сте, не сте лути.
11:55
you're angry, you're not angry.
257
703308
1523
Но одвратноста е различна.
11:56
But disgust is different.
258
704855
1310
Овратноста ја моделира
личноста како нечовекмонструм,
11:58
Disgust paints the person
as subhuman, monstrous,
259
706189
4473
деформиран, морално деформиран.
12:02
deformed, morally deformed.
260
710686
1809
Одвратноста е како мастило
што не се брише.
12:04
Disgust is like indelible ink.
261
712519
2424
Има едно истражување од Џон Готман
за брачна терапија.
12:07
There's research from John Gottman
on marital therapy.
262
715768
3515
ако погледнете во лицата-ако еден од
партнерите покаже одвратност или презир
12:11
If you look at the faces -- if one
of the couple shows disgust or contempt,
263
719307
5125
има показател дека тие
набргу ќе се разведат,
12:16
that's a predictor that they're going
to get divorced soon,
264
724456
3096
додека ако покажуваат бес,
тоа не покажува ништо
12:19
whereas if they show anger,
that doesn't predict anything,
265
727576
2899
зашто ако добро се справувате
со бесот, тој може да е добар.
12:22
because if you deal with anger well,
it actually is good.
266
730499
2709
Значи, овие избори се различни.
12:25
So this election is different.
267
733232
1452
12:26
Donald Trump personally
uses the word "disgust" a lot.
268
734708
3654
Доналд Трумп лично често
го користи зборот `одвратен`.
Тој е прилично осетлив на бацили
така што `одвратно`е важно
12:30
He's very germ-sensitive,
so disgust does matter a lot --
269
738386
2857
повеќе за него,тоа е нешто
што е единствено за него,
12:33
more for him, that's something
unique to him --
270
741267
3910
но ние, колку повеќе се демонизираме
едни со други
12:37
but as we demonize each other more,
271
745201
2903
12:40
and again, through
the Manichaean worldview,
272
748128
3409
и повторно, преку гледиштата
на Манихејството,
идејата дека светот е битка
помеѓу доброто и злото
12:43
the idea that the world
is a battle between good and evil
273
751561
2730
и ова е тоа што нѐ жести,
12:46
as this has been ramping up,
274
754315
1347
12:47
we're more likely not just to say
they're wrong or I don't like them,
275
755686
3326
и не велиме само дека некој не
е во право или не ни се допаѓа
туку велиме дека
е злобен, сатански,
12:51
but we say they're evil, they're satanic,
276
759036
2536
одвратен и одбивен.
12:53
they're disgusting, they're revolting.
277
761596
1921
И не сакаме ништо да се имаме со нив.
12:55
And then we want nothing to do with them.
278
763541
2866
Затоа сметам дека го гледаме
тоа сега на универзитетите.
12:58
And that's why I think we're seeing it,
for example, on campus now.
279
766806
3487
13:02
We're seeing more the urge
to keep people off campus,
280
770317
2640
Имаме сѐ повеќе потреба да ги држиме
луѓето настрана од универзитетите,
13:04
silence them, keep them away.
281
772981
1945
да ги стивнеме, да бидат подалеку.
13:06
I'm afraid that this whole
generation of young people,
282
774950
2595
Се плашам дека цела оваа
генерација на млади луѓе,
13:09
if their introduction to politics
involves a lot of disgust,
283
777569
3793
ако нивната улога во политиката
вклучува одвратност,
тие нема да сакаат да бидат вклучени
во политика во подоцнежни години.
13:13
they're not going to want to be involved
in politics as they get older.
284
781386
3705
К.А: како да се справиме со ова?
13:17
CA: So how do we deal with that?
285
785506
1840
13:19
Disgust. How do you defuse disgust?
286
787370
4480
Одвратност. Како да ја намалиме
одвратноста?
Џ.Х:Не може да се направи тоа со причини.
13:24
JH: You can't do it with reasons.
287
792874
1948
Мислам..
13:27
I think ...
288
795312
1191
Ја проучував одвратноста долги години
и многу рзмислувам за емоциите.
13:30
I studied disgust for many years,
and I think about emotions a lot.
289
798257
3217
Мислам дека спротивно
на одвратноста е љубовта.
13:33
And I think that the opposite
of disgust is actually love.
290
801498
3525
Љубовта има врска со.....на пример,
13:37
Love is all about, like ...
291
805764
3091
одвратноста затвора граници.
13:41
Disgust is closing off, borders.
292
809239
2571
Љубовта е во врска со уривање на ѕидовите.
13:43
Love is about dissolving walls.
293
811834
2545
Личните врски, сметам
13:47
So personal relationships, I think,
294
815074
2480
дека се веројатно најсилното
средство што го имаме.
13:49
are probably the most
powerful means we have.
295
817578
2759
Може да ви е одвратна група на на луѓе,
13:53
You can be disgusted by a group of people,
296
821291
2697
но ако сретнете одредена личност
13:56
but then you meet a particular person
297
824012
1918
може да откриете дека е прекрасна.
13:57
and you genuinely discover
that they're lovely.
298
825954
2776
И тогаш постепено тоа се намалува
или ја менува вашата категорија.
14:00
And then gradually that chips away
or changes your category as well.
299
828754
4296
Трагедијата е што Американците беа
повеќе мешани во нивните градови.
14:06
The tragedy is, Americans used to be
much more mixed up in the their towns
300
834016
5977
со леви и десни или политички.
14:12
by left-right or politics.
301
840017
2134
Сега кога стануваат многу повеќе
морално разединети
14:14
And now that it's become
this great moral divide,
302
842175
2331
има многу показатели дека
се придвижуваме кон луѓе
14:16
there's a lot of evidence
that we're moving to be near people
303
844530
3143
кои се слични на нас политички.
14:19
who are like us politically.
304
847697
1512
Тешко е да се најди некој
на спротивната страна.
14:21
It's harder to find somebody
who's on the other side.
305
849233
2530
Така, тие се таму, некаде подалеку.
14:23
So they're over there, they're far away.
306
851787
2290
тешко е да се запознаат.
14:26
It's harder to get to know them.
307
854101
1570
14:27
CA: What would you say to someone
or say to Americans,
308
855695
4224
К.А: Што би му кажале некому,
или што би им рекле на Американците
на луѓето генерално,
14:31
people generally,
309
859943
1158
во врска со она што треба
да го разбереме за себе си
14:33
about what we should understand
about each other
310
861125
2609
што ќе ни помогне за миг
да размислиме повторно
14:35
that might help us rethink for a minute
311
863758
3475
14:39
this "disgust" instinct?
312
867257
2203
за инстинктот на одвратност?
Џ.Х: Да.
14:42
JH: Yes.
313
870086
1152
Најважно е да имаме на ум-
14:43
A really important
thing to keep in mind --
314
871262
2153
има една студија на политикологот
Алан Абрамович
14:45
there's research by political
scientist Alan Abramowitz,
315
873439
4716
која покажува дека американската
демократија сѐ повеќе е предводена
14:50
showing that American democracy
is increasingly governed
316
878179
3993
14:54
by what's called "negative partisanship."
317
882196
2243
од т.н. `негативна партизација`.
Тоа значи дека мислите,
во ред, има еден кандидат
14:56
That means you think,
OK there's a candidate,
318
884875
3111
15:00
you like the candidate,
you vote for the candidate.
319
888010
2406
ви се допѓа кандидатот, гласате за него.
Но со порастот на негативните реклами
15:02
But with the rise of negative advertising
320
890440
2059
социјалните медиуми и
сите останати трендови,
15:04
and social media
and all sorts of other trends,
321
892523
2224
начинот на спроведување на изборите
15:06
increasingly, the way elections are done
322
894771
2041
е таков што секој се обидува на најужасен
начин да ја оцрни спротивната страна
15:08
is that each side tries to make
the other side so horrible, so awful,
323
896836
3981
и на крај автоматски
гласате за мојот избор.
15:12
that you'll vote for my guy by default.
324
900841
2041
И така, колку почесто гласаме
против спротивната страна
15:15
And so as we more and more vote
against the other side
325
903319
2970
а не за нашата,
15:18
and not for our side,
326
906313
1331
треба да знаете дека ако
луѓето се на левата страна,
15:19
you have to keep in mind
that if people are on the left,
327
907668
5507
велат:„мислев дека републиканците се лоши,
15:25
they think, "Well, I used to think
that Republicans were bad,
328
913199
2910
но сега Доналд Трумп
го потврдува тоа
15:28
but now Donald Trump proves it.
329
916133
1483
секој републиканец ќе го насликам
со сѐ она
15:29
And now every Republican,
I can paint with all the things
330
917640
2851
што мислам за Трамп.“
15:32
that I think about Trump."
331
920515
1382
Тоа не мора да е вистина.
15:33
And that's not necessarily true.
332
921921
1593
Тие всушност не се многу
среќни со својот кандидат.
15:35
They're generally not very happy
with their candidate.
333
923538
2692
Ова е најнесреќната негативна партизација
на изборите во Американската историја.
15:38
This is the most negative partisanship
election in American history.
334
926254
4716
Значи, прво треба да ги тргнете
чувствата за кандидтот
15:43
So you have to first separate
your feelings about the candidate
335
931860
3363
од чувствата за луѓето на
кои им е даден изборот.
15:47
from your feelings about the people
who are given a choice.
336
935247
2937
И тогаш ќе мора да сфатите дека,
15:50
And then you have to realize that,
337
938208
2483
бидејќи сите живееме во
посебен морален свет
15:53
because we all live
in a separate moral world --
338
941246
2420
метафората од книгата дека
сме фатени во стапицата на Матрикс,
15:55
the metaphor I use in the book
is that we're all trapped in "The Matrix,"
339
943690
3451
или секоја морална заедница е матрикс,
взаемна халуцинација.
15:59
or each moral community is a matrix,
a consensual hallucination.
340
947165
3524
Така, ако сте во синиот матрикс,
16:02
And so if you're within the blue matrix,
341
950713
2243
сѐ е комплетно јасно дека другата страна-
16:04
everything's completely compelling
that the other side --
342
952980
3194
тие се, заостанати, расисти,
најлошите луѓе во светот.
16:08
they're troglodytes, they're racists,
they're the worst people in the world,
343
956198
3631
и ги имате сите факти да
го поддржите тоа.
16:11
and you have all the facts
to back that up.
344
959853
2104
Но некој од другата куќа до вашата,
16:13
But somebody in the next house from yours
345
961981
2275
живее во друг морален матрикс.
16:16
is living in a different moral matrix.
346
964280
2033
Живее во друга видео игра,
16:18
They live in a different video game,
347
966337
1947
и гледа сосема други факти.
16:20
and they see a completely
different set of facts.
348
968308
2378
И секој гледа различни закани за државата.
16:22
And each one sees
different threats to the country.
349
970710
2676
И она што открив живеејќи на средина,
16:25
And what I've found
from being in the middle
350
973410
2090
за да ги разберам двете
страни,е дека обете се во право.
16:27
and trying to understand both sides
is: both sides are right.
351
975524
2927
Има многу закани за оваа држава
16:30
There are a lot of threats
to this country,
352
978475
2120
и ниту една страна не е во
состојба да ги види сите.
16:32
and each side is constitutionally
incapable of seeing them all.
353
980619
3485
К.А: Значи, велите дека ни треба
поинаков вид на емпатија?
16:36
CA: So, are you saying
that we almost need a new type of empathy?
354
984963
6519
Емпатијата во традиционална смисла значи:
16:43
Empathy is traditionally framed as:
355
991506
2170
„Ја чувствувам твојата болка.
Можам да се ставам во твоја кожа.“
16:45
"Oh, I feel your pain.
I can put myself in your shoes."
356
993700
2691
16:48
And we apply it to the poor,
the needy, the suffering.
357
996415
2929
И го применуваме тоа кон
сиромашните и оние кои страдат.
Не го правиме тоа кон луѓето
кои ги чувствуваме како други,
16:52
We don't usually apply it
to people who we feel as other,
358
1000023
3823
16:55
or we're disgusted by.
359
1003870
1465
или ни се овратни.
16:57
JH: No. That's right.
360
1005359
1151
Џ.Х:Точно.
К.А: Како би изгледало да изградиме
таков вид на емпатија?
16:58
CA: What would it look like
to build that type of empathy?
361
1006534
4830
Џ.Х: Всушност, мислам...
17:04
JH: Actually, I think ...
362
1012268
1238
Емпатијата е многу актуелна
тема во психологијата,
17:06
Empathy is a very, very
hot topic in psychology,
363
1014145
2305
17:08
and it's a very popular word
on the left in particular.
364
1016474
2658
и зборот е многу популарен
кај левичарите особено.
Емпатијата е добра работа, емпатија
за оние кои се жртви.
17:11
Empathy is a good thing, and empathy
for the preferred classes of victims.
365
1019156
4000
17:15
So it's important to empathize
366
1023180
1453
Значи, важно е да имаме емпатија
17:16
with the groups that we on the left
think are so important.
367
1024657
2824
кон луѓето кои ние на левата страна
сметаме дека се значајни.
17:19
That's easy to do,
because you get points for that.
368
1027505
2531
Тоа е лесно да се стори зашто
добивате поени за тоа.
Но,емпатијата треба да ви донесе поени
ако ја имате кога е тешко да се има.
17:22
But empathy really should get you points
if you do it when it's hard to do.
369
1030442
3649
Мислам...
17:26
And, I think ...
370
1034513
1754
17:28
You know, we had a long 50-year period
of dealing with our race problems
371
1036291
5088
Знаете, 50-тина година се боревме
со проблемите на расизмот
и законската дискриминација,
17:33
and legal discrimination,
372
1041403
2255
и тоа ни беше врвен
приоритет долго време
17:35
and that was our top priority
for a long time
373
1043682
2187
и сѐуште е важно.
17:37
and it still is important.
374
1045893
1250
Но, мислам оваа година
17:39
But I think this year,
375
1047167
1529
17:40
I'm hoping it will make people see
376
1048720
2404
се надевам ќе придонесе луѓето да видат
17:43
that we have an existential
threat on our hands.
377
1051148
2795
дека се соочуваме со
егзистенцијална закана.
17:45
Our left-right divide, I believe,
378
1053967
2667
Поделбата на леви и десни, верувам
17:48
is by far the most important
divide we face.
379
1056658
2160
е најголемата поделба што сме ја виделе.
17:50
We still have issues about race
and gender and LGBT,
380
1058842
3031
Сѐуште имаме проблеми
околу раси, пол и ЛГБТ,
но оваа е итната потреба
во наредните 50 години
17:53
but this is the urgent need
of the next 50 years,
381
1061897
3371
а работите нема да се
подобрат сами по себе.
17:57
and things aren't going
to get better on their own.
382
1065292
2861
Ќе треба да направиме многу
институционални реформи,
18:01
So we're going to need to do
a lot of institutional reforms,
383
1069021
2835
и може да зборуваме за тоа,
18:03
and we could talk about that,
384
1071880
1409
но тоа е еден долг, несигурен дијалог.
18:05
but that's like a whole long,
wonky conversation.
385
1073313
2330
Но сметам дека тоа започнува со луѓето
кога ќе сфатат дека ова е пресвртница
18:07
But I think it starts with people
realizing that this is a turning point.
386
1075667
3846
18:11
And yes, we need a new kind of empathy.
387
1079537
2809
И да, ќе ни треба нов вид на емпатија,
Треба да сфатиме:
18:14
We need to realize:
388
1082370
1505
ова е тоа што на нашата
држава ѝ е потребно,
18:15
this is what our country needs,
389
1083899
1542
18:17
and this is what you need
if you don't want to --
390
1085465
2354
и ова е тоа што
нам ни треба ако..
Кренете рака ако сакате наредните
4 години да ги поминете
18:19
Raise your hand if you want
to spend the next four years
391
1087843
2695
лути и загрижени како што
сте оваа година, кренете рака.
18:22
as angry and worried as you've been
for the last year -- raise your hand.
392
1090562
3486
Ако сакате да избегате од ова,
18:26
So if you want to escape from this,
393
1094072
1705
читајте го Буда, Исус и Марко Аурелие.
18:27
read Buddha, read Jesus,
read Marcus Aurelius.
394
1095801
2151
Сите тие даваат извонредни совети
како да се отфрли стравот,
18:29
They have all kinds of great advice
for how to drop the fear,
395
1097976
5062
да се поправат работите,
18:35
reframe things,
396
1103062
1178
и да престанеме да ги гледаме
другите како непријатели.
18:36
stop seeing other people as your enemy.
397
1104264
2083
18:38
There's a lot of guidance in ancient
wisdom for this kind of empathy.
398
1106371
3307
Во старата мудрост има многу
упатства за овој вид емпатија.
К.А: Моето последно прашање:
18:41
CA: Here's my last question:
399
1109702
1377
Лично, што можат луѓето
да сторат за да си помогнат?
18:43
Personally, what can
people do to help heal?
400
1111103
4335
18:47
JH: Yeah, it's very hard to just decide
to overcome your deepest prejudices.
401
1115462
4083
Џ.Х: Тешко е едноставно да одлучиме и
да ги премостиме најдлабоките предрасуди.
18:51
And there's research showing
402
1119569
1461
Истражувањата покажуваат
18:53
that political prejudices are deeper
and stronger than race prejudices
403
1121054
4349
дека политичките предрасуди
се подлабоки и посилни од расните
18:57
in the country now.
404
1125427
1260
во земјава во моментов.
Затоа, сметам дека треба да се
вложат напори-тоа е основното.
18:59
So I think you have to make an effort --
that's the main thing.
405
1127395
3432
Направете напори да се видите со некого.
19:02
Make an effort to actually meet somebody.
406
1130851
2004
19:04
Everybody has a cousin, a brother-in-law,
407
1132879
2210
Секој има роднина, зет, шура,
некој кој е на другата страна.
19:07
somebody who's on the other side.
408
1135113
1869
После овие избори-
19:09
So, after this election --
409
1137006
1816
почекајте недела, две,
19:11
wait a week or two,
410
1139252
1351
бидејќи некој ќе се чувствува ужасно-
19:12
because it's probably going to feel
awful for one of you --
411
1140627
2836
но почекојте некоја недела и после
побарајте ги и разговарајте.
19:15
but wait a couple weeks, and then
reach out and say you want to talk.
412
1143487
4152
И пред да го сторите тоа.
19:19
And before you do it,
413
1147663
1424
Читајте ја „Како да имате пријатели и
влијание врз луѓето“ на Д. Карнеги.
19:21
read Dale Carnegie, "How to Win
Friends and Influence People" --
414
1149111
3145
(Смеа)
19:24
(Laughter)
415
1152280
1039
19:25
I'm totally serious.
416
1153343
1167
Сериозен сум.
Ќе научите техники ако
почнете со признавање.
19:26
You'll learn techniques
if you start by acknowledging,
417
1154534
2590
Ако почнете да велите:
19:29
if you start by saying,
418
1157148
1161
„Знаеш, не се согласуваме многу,
19:30
"You know, we don't agree on a lot,
419
1158333
1670
но нешто што почитувам кај тебе стрико..“
19:32
but one thing I really respect
about you, Uncle Bob,"
420
1160027
2538
или...кај твоите конзервативци е.....“
19:34
or "... about you conservatives, is ... "
421
1162589
2059
Ќе најдете нешто.
19:36
And you can find something.
422
1164672
1334
Ако почнете со пофалби,
тоа е како магија.
19:38
If you start with some
appreciation, it's like magic.
423
1166030
2763
Ова е основното нешто што го научив
19:40
This is one of the main
things I've learned
424
1168817
2114
и го применувам во односите со луѓето.
19:42
that I take into my human relationships.
425
1170955
1913
Сѐ уште правам глупави грешки
19:44
I still make lots of stupid mistakes,
426
1172892
1920
но неверојатно сум добар во извинување
19:46
but I'm incredibly good
at apologizing now,
427
1174836
2016
и признавање за што другиот
бил во право.
19:48
and at acknowledging what
somebody was right about.
428
1176876
2417
19:51
And if you do that,
429
1179317
1154
Ако го направите тоа,
19:52
then the conversation goes really well,
and it's actually really fun.
430
1180495
3494
разговорот ќе се одвива навистина
добро и може да е забавно.
К.А:Џон, навистина е чудесно
да се разговара со вас.
19:56
CA: Jon, it's absolutely fascinating
speaking with you.
431
1184717
2645
Изгледа како тлото под нас
19:59
It's really does feel like
the ground that we're on
432
1187386
3758
20:03
is a ground populated by deep questions
of morality and human nature.
433
1191168
4867
да е тло исполнето со длабоки прашања
за моралноста и човечката природа.
Вашата мудрост не ни може
да биде порелевантна.
20:08
Your wisdom couldn't be more relevant.
434
1196366
2424
20:10
Thank you so much for sharing
this time with us.
435
1198814
2295
Ви благодарам што бевте со нас.
20:13
JH: Thanks, Chris.
436
1201133
1152
20:14
JH: Thanks, everyone.
437
1202309
1161
Џ.Х: Благодарам Крис.
20:15
(Applause)
438
1203494
2000
Џ.Х:Благорама на сите.

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Jonathan Haidt - Social psychologist
Jonathan Haidt studies how -- and why -- we evolved to be moral and political creatures.

Why you should listen

By understanding more about our moral psychology and its biases, Jonathan Haidt says we can design better institutions (including companies, universities and democracy itself), and we can learn to be more civil and open-minded toward those who are not on our team.

Haidt is a social psychologist whose research on morality across cultures led to his 2008 TED Talk on the psychological roots of the American culture war, and his 2013 TED Talk on how "common threats can make common ground." In both of those talks he asks, "Can't we all disagree more constructively?" Haidt's 2012 TED Talk explored the intersection of his work on morality with his work on happiness to talk about "hive psychology" -- the ability that humans have to lose themselves in groups pursuing larger projects, almost like bees in a hive. This hivish ability is crucial, he argues, for understanding the origins of morality, politics, and religion. These are ideas that Haidt develops at greater length in his book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion.

Haidt joined New York University Stern School of Business in July 2011. He is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership, based in the Business and Society Program. Before coming to Stern, Professor Haidt taught for 16 years at the University of Virginia in the department of psychology.

Haidt's writings appear frequently in the New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He was named one of the top global thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine and by Prospect magazine. Haidt received a B.A. in Philosophy from Yale University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

More profile about the speaker
Jonathan Haidt | Speaker | TED.com
Chris Anderson - TED Curator
After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Why you should listen

Chris Anderson is the Curator of TED, a nonprofit devoted to sharing valuable ideas, primarily through the medium of 'TED Talks' -- short talks that are offered free online to a global audience.

Chris was born in a remote village in Pakistan in 1957. He spent his early years in India, Pakistan and Afghanistan, where his parents worked as medical missionaries, and he attended an American school in the Himalayas for his early education. After boarding school in Bath, England, he went on to Oxford University, graduating in 1978 with a degree in philosophy, politics and economics.

Chris then trained as a journalist, working in newspapers and radio, including two years producing a world news service in the Seychelles Islands.

Back in the UK in 1984, Chris was captivated by the personal computer revolution and became an editor at one of the UK's early computer magazines. A year later he founded Future Publishing with a $25,000 bank loan. The new company initially focused on specialist computer publications but eventually expanded into other areas such as cycling, music, video games, technology and design, doubling in size every year for seven years. In 1994, Chris moved to the United States where he built Imagine Media, publisher of Business 2.0 magazine and creator of the popular video game users website IGN. Chris eventually merged Imagine and Future, taking the combined entity public in London in 1999, under the Future name. At its peak, it published 150 magazines and websites and employed 2,000 people.

This success allowed Chris to create a private nonprofit organization, the Sapling Foundation, with the hope of finding new ways to tackle tough global issues through media, technology, entrepreneurship and, most of all, ideas. In 2001, the foundation acquired the TED Conference, then an annual meeting of luminaries in the fields of Technology, Entertainment and Design held in Monterey, California, and Chris left Future to work full time on TED.

He expanded the conference's remit to cover all topics, including science, business and key global issues, while adding a Fellows program, which now has some 300 alumni, and the TED Prize, which grants its recipients "one wish to change the world." The TED stage has become a place for thinkers and doers from all fields to share their ideas and their work, capturing imaginations, sparking conversation and encouraging discovery along the way.

In 2006, TED experimented with posting some of its talks on the Internet. Their viral success encouraged Chris to begin positioning the organization as a global media initiative devoted to 'ideas worth spreading,' part of a new era of information dissemination using the power of online video. In June 2015, the organization posted its 2,000th talk online. The talks are free to view, and they have been translated into more than 100 languages with the help of volunteers from around the world. Viewership has grown to approximately one billion views per year.

Continuing a strategy of 'radical openness,' in 2009 Chris introduced the TEDx initiative, allowing free licenses to local organizers who wished to organize their own TED-like events. More than 8,000 such events have been held, generating an archive of 60,000 TEDx talks. And three years later, the TED-Ed program was launched, offering free educational videos and tools to students and teachers.

More profile about the speaker
Chris Anderson | Speaker | TED.com