ABOUT THE SPEAKER
David Titley - Meteorologist
Scientist and retired Navy officer Dr. David Titley asks a big question: Could the US military play a role in combating climate change?

Why you should listen

David Titley is a Professor of Practice in Meteorology and a Professor of International Affairs at the Pennsylvania State University. He is the founding director of Penn State’s Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk. He served as a naval officer for 32 years and rose to the rank of Rear Admiral. Titley’s career included duties as commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; oceanographer and navigator of the Navy; and deputy assistant chief of naval operations for information dominance. He also served as senior military assistant for the director, Office of Net Assessment in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

While serving in the Pentagon, Titley initiated and led the U.S. Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change. After retiring from the Navy, Titley served as the Deputy Undersecretary of Commerce for Operations, the chief operating officer position at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Titley serves on numerous advisory boards and National Academies of Science committees, including the CNA Military Advisory Board, the Center for Climate and Security and the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Titley is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

More profile about the speaker
David Titley | Speaker | TED.com
TED2017

David Titley: How the military fights climate change

Дејвид Титли: Битката на Армијата со климатските промени

Filmed:
991,056 views

„Војсководците веќе со милениуми знаат дека вистинското време за подготвување за некој предизвик е пред да бидете нападнати“-вели Дејвид Титли, научник и пензиониран офицер на Воената морнарица на САД. На еден несекојдневен, практичен и објективен начин тој нè води преку хуманитарната катастрофа во Сирија до ледените брегови на Свалбард за да ни прикаже како пристапува армијата кон опасностите од климатските промени. „Мразот не прашува кој е во Белата куќа, ниту која партија е на чело на вашиот Парламент“. Титли нагласува:„ Мразот едноставно се топи“.
- Meteorologist
Scientist and retired Navy officer Dr. David Titley asks a big question: Could the US military play a role in combating climate change? Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:12
So I'd like to tell you a story
about climate and change,
0
833
3823
Сакам да ви раскажам приказна за климата
и климатските промени,
00:16
but it's really a story about people
and not polar bears.
1
4680
2666
но ова е приказна за луѓето,
не за поларните мечки.
00:20
So this is our house
that we lived in in the mid-2000s.
2
8640
3536
Ова е нашата куќа во која живеевме
во средината на 2000-те години.
00:24
I was the chief operating officer
for the Navy's weather and ocean service.
3
12200
4776
Работев како главен оператор
во Поморската метеоролошка служба.
00:29
It happened to be down at a place
called Stennis Space Center
4
17000
2896
Тоа беше во Вселенскиот центар Стенис,
00:31
right on the Gulf Coast,
5
19920
1256
во Мексиканскиот Залив,
00:33
so we lived in a little town
called Waveland, Mississippi,
6
21200
2715
и живеевме во гратчето Вејвленд, Мисисипи,
00:35
nice modest house, and as you can see,
it's up against a storm surge.
7
23939
3517
во убава, скромна куќа, издигната
за заштита од морски бури.
00:39
Now, if you ever wonder
8
27480
2656
Ако се прашувате
00:42
what a 30-foot or nine-meter
storm surge does
9
30160
3456
што може да направи
9-метарска бура
00:45
coming up your street,
10
33640
2056
која доаѓа кон вашата улица,
00:47
let me show you.
11
35720
1616
ќе ви покажам.
00:49
Same house.
12
37360
1336
Истата куќа.
00:50
That's me, kind of wondering what's next.
13
38720
3536
Тоа сум јас прашувајќи се
што следува понатаму.
00:54
But when we say we lost our house --
this is, like, right after Katrina --
14
42280
3496
Но кога велиме ја изгубивме куќата,
ова е веднаш по Катрина-
00:57
so the house is either all the way
up there in the railway tracks,
15
45800
3816
куќата е или горе кај железничките шини,
01:01
or it's somewhere down there
in the Gulf of Mexico,
16
49640
2816
или некаде долу во Мексиканскиот Залив
01:04
and to this day,
we really, we lost our house.
17
52480
2176
и веќе ја немаме.
01:06
We don't know where it is.
18
54680
1256
Не знаеме каде е.
01:07
(Laughter)
19
55960
1256
(Смеа)
01:09
You know, it's gone.
20
57240
1856
Знаете, ја снема.
01:11
So I don't show this for pity,
21
59120
4896
Не го покажувам ова за сожалување,
01:16
because in many ways, we were
the luckiest people on the Gulf Coast.
22
64040
4416
зашто сепак имавме многу
повеќе среќа од другите во Заливот.
01:20
One of the things is, we had insurance,
23
68480
2856
Прво, имавме осигурување,
01:23
and that idea of insurance
is probably pretty important there.
24
71360
4416
а тоа е прилично важно во вакви услови.
01:27
But does this scale up,
you know, what happened here?
25
75800
2936
Но дали ова вистински
покажува што се случи?
01:30
And I think it kind of does,
because as you've heard,
26
78760
3256
Мислам да, зашто знаете дека,
01:34
as the sea levels come up,
27
82040
1696
кога нивото на морето се покачува,
01:35
it takes weaker and weaker storms
to do something like this.
28
83760
3896
дури и послаби бури можат
да предизвикаат вакво нешто.
01:39
So let's just step back for a second
and kind of look at this.
29
87680
3896
Да се вратиме назад
и да погледнеме нешто.
01:43
And, you know,
climate's really complicated,
30
91600
2576
Знаеме дека климата е навистина
комплицирана тема,
01:46
a lot of moving parts in this,
31
94200
2776
многу фактори треба
да се земат во предвид,
01:49
but I kind of put it about
it's all about the water.
32
97000
2896
но јас велам дека сѐ
е поврзано со водата.
01:51
See, see those three blue dots
there down on the lower part?
33
99920
3376
Ги гледате трите сини точки
во долниот дел?
01:55
The one you can easily see,
that's all the water in the world.
34
103320
3296
Таа која јасно се гледа
е целата вода на Земјата.
01:58
Those two smaller dots,
those are the fresh water.
35
106640
3456
Двете помали точки
ја претставуваат питката вода.
02:02
And it turns out
that as the climate changes,
36
110120
3336
Се покажа дека
како што се менува климата
02:05
the distribution of that water
is changing very fundamentally.
37
113480
3496
така драстично се менува
и распределбата на водата.
02:09
So now we have too much, too little,
wrong place, wrong time.
38
117000
3736
Ја имаме премногу, премалку, на погрешо
место и во погрешно време.
02:12
It's salty where it should be fresh;
it's liquid where it should be frozen;
39
120760
4576
Солена е таму каде треба да е слатка,
течна каде треба да е смрзната.
02:17
it's wet where it should be dry;
40
125360
1576
Влажно е каде треба да е суво,
02:18
and in fact, the very chemistry
of the ocean itself is changing.
41
126960
3775
и самата хемија на океанот се менува.
02:22
And what that does
from a security or a military part
42
130759
4937
Што покажува ова од безбедносен
и воен аспект?
02:27
is it does three things:
43
135720
2256
Се случуваат три работи:
02:30
it changes the very operating
environment that we're working in,
44
138000
3576
се менува работната
средина во која дејствуваме,
02:33
it threatens our bases,
45
141600
1576
нашите бази се во опасност,
02:35
and then it has geostrategic risks,
which sounds kind of fancy
46
143200
3496
и постојат геостратешки ризици
кои се изненадувачки
02:38
and I'll explain what I mean
by that in a second.
47
146720
3256
и ќе ви објаснам зошто.
02:42
So let's go to just
a couple examples here.
48
150000
3496
Да видиме неколку примери.
02:45
And we'll start off with what we all know
49
153520
2216
Ќе почнеме со нешто кое
ни е познато на сите,
02:47
is of course a political
and humanitarian catastrophe
50
155760
3176
една политичката и човечка катастрофа-
02:50
that is Syria.
51
158960
1416
а тоа е Сирија.
02:52
And it turns out that climate
was one of the causes
52
160400
4416
Се покажа дека климата
е една од причините
02:56
in a long chain of events.
53
164840
2696
во долгата низа на настани.
02:59
It actually started back in the 1970s.
54
167560
2776
Всушност, започна во 70-те години
на 20. век.
03:02
When Assad took control over Syria,
55
170360
2856
Кога Асад ја презеде власта во Сирија,
03:05
he decided he wanted to be self-sufficient
in things like wheat and barley.
56
173240
5136
одлучил да биде независен во однос
на производство на пченица и јачмен.
03:10
Now, you would like to think
57
178400
1656
Сега ќе помислите
03:12
that there was somebody
in Assad's office that said,
58
180080
2456
дека некој близок соработник
му дошепнал на Асад:
03:14
"Hey boss, you know,
we're in the eastern Mediterranean,
59
182560
3096
„Еј, шефе, ова е источниот Медитеран,
03:17
kind of dry here,
maybe not the best idea."
60
185680
3456
сува е почвата,
знаете - ова не е добра идеја.“
03:21
But I think what happened was,
61
189160
1456
Но мислам ова се случило:
03:22
"Boss, you are a smart, powerful
and handsome man. We'll get right on it."
62
190640
4096
„Шефе, ти си умен, моќен и привлечен
човек. Веднаш да почнеме.“
03:26
And they did.
63
194760
1216
И почнаа.
03:28
So by the '90s, believe it or not,
64
196000
3936
До 90-те години, верувале или не,
03:31
they were actually
self-sufficient in food,
65
199960
3416
станаа независни
во снабдувањето со храна
03:35
but they did it at a great cost.
66
203400
1576
но по многу висока цена.
03:37
They did it at a cost of their aquifers,
67
205000
1936
По цена на водоносните слоеви,
03:38
they did it at a cost
of their surface water.
68
206960
2136
по цена на надземните води.
Секако, имаше и низа други,
неклиматски фактори
03:41
And of course, there are
many nonclimate issues
69
209120
2216
кои придонесоа
за состојбата во Сирија.
03:43
that also contributed to Syria.
70
211360
1696
03:45
There was the Iraq War,
71
213080
1216
Во Ирак се случи војна,
03:46
and as you can see
by that lower blue line there,
72
214320
2416
и како што покажува долната сина линија,
03:48
over a million refugees
come into the cities.
73
216760
3216
преку милион бегалци
пребегнаа во градовите.
03:52
And then about a decade ago,
74
220000
1736
А пред една деценија,
03:53
there's this tremendous
heat wave and drought --
75
221760
3136
се случи огромниот топлотен бран и суша
03:56
fingerprints all over that show,
76
224920
2056
и оставените траги покажуваат дека-
03:59
yes, this is in fact related
to the changing climate --
77
227000
3216
иако ова беше резултат
на климатските промени-
04:02
has put another three quarters
of a million farmers
78
230240
2936
уште 750.000 фармери
04:05
into those same cities.
79
233200
1896
заминале во истите градови.
04:07
Why? Because they had nothing.
80
235120
2480
Зошто? Бидејќи немале ништо.
04:10
They had dust. They had dirt.
They had nothing.
81
238200
2976
Немаа ништо друго освен
прашина и нечистотија.
04:13
So now they're in the cities,
82
241200
2016
Значи, сега тие се во градовите,
04:15
the Iraqis are in the cities,
83
243240
1416
и Ирачаните се во градовите,
04:16
it's Assad, it's not like
he's taking care of his people,
84
244680
3096
Асад, кој е на власт, не дека
се грижи за овие луѓе,
04:19
and all of a sudden
we have just this huge issue here
85
247800
4296
и наеднаш го имаме овој голем проблем
04:24
of massive instability
86
252120
2256
на огромна нестабилност
04:26
and a breeding ground for extremism.
87
254400
2256
и погодна почва за екстремизам.
04:28
And this is why in the security community
88
256680
1976
Ова е причината зошто во безбедноста
04:30
we call climate change
a risk to instability.
89
258680
3696
сметаме дека климатските
промени се причина за нестабилност.
04:34
It accelerates instability here.
90
262400
2256
Ја засилуваат нестабилноста.
04:36
In plain English,
it makes bad places worse.
91
264680
2760
Едноставно речено, лошите
места ги прават уште полоши.
04:40
So let's go to another place here.
92
268240
1656
Да одиме на едно друго место.
04:41
Now we're going to go 2,000 kilometers,
or about 1,200 miles, north of Oslo,
93
269920
4576
Ќе одиме 2000 км северно од Осло,
04:46
only 600 miles from the Pole,
94
274520
2536
само 900 км од Северниот пол,
04:49
and this is arguably
95
277080
2536
и ова е, несомнено
04:51
the most strategic island
you've never heard of.
96
279640
2256
најстратешкиот остров
за кој не сте чуле досега.
04:53
It's a place called Svalbard.
97
281920
1576
Местото се вика Свалбард.
04:55
It sits astride the sea lanes
98
283520
2216
Се наоѓа спроти морските патишта
04:57
that the Russian Northern Fleet needs
to get out and go into warmer waters.
99
285760
5256
кои ги користи Северната руска флота
за излез и влез во потопли води.
05:03
It is also, by virtue of its geography,
100
291040
2976
Истотака, благодарение
на неговите географски одлики,
05:06
a place where you can control
every single polar orbiting satellite
101
294040
3536
место од каде може да се следи секој
сателит кој минува над половите,
05:09
on every orbit.
102
297600
1256
при секое кружење.
05:10
It is the strategic high ground of space.
103
298880
2616
Тоа е стратешка точка за контрола
на вселената.
05:13
Climate change has greatly reduced
the sea ice around here,
104
301520
3256
Климатските промени значително
го имаат намалено тука мразот
05:16
greatly increasing human activity,
105
304800
2816
и ги имаат интензивирано
човечките активности.
05:19
and it's becoming a flashpoint,
106
307640
1496
Местото станува жариште на судири,
05:21
and in fact the NATO
Parliamentary Assembly
107
309160
2056
и тука Парламентарното собрание
на НАТО ќе одржат средба следниот месец.
05:23
is going to meet here
on Svalbard next month.
108
311240
3016
05:26
The Russians are very,
very unhappy about that.
109
314280
2736
Русите не се многу среќни заради ова.
05:29
So if you want to find
a flashpoint in the Arctic,
110
317040
2656
Ако сакате да најдете жариште
на судири на Арктикот,
05:31
look at Svalbard there.
111
319720
1640
погледнете во Свалбард.
05:34
Now, in the military,
112
322440
1776
Во армијата,
05:36
we have known for decades,
if not centuries,
113
324240
2336
знаеме со децении, ако не и со векови,
05:38
that the time to prepare,
114
326600
2016
дека вистинското време за подготвка -
05:40
whether it's for a hurricane,
a typhoon or strategic changes,
115
328640
3736
за ураган или тајфун или
за стратешки промени-
05:44
is before they hit you,
116
332400
1856
вистинското време е пред ударот.
05:46
and Admiral Nimitz was right there.
117
334280
1696
И адмиралот Нимиц беше во право.
05:48
That is the time to prepare.
118
336000
1976
Тоа е вистинскиот момент за подготвување.
05:50
Fortunately, our Secretary of Defense,
119
338000
2496
За среќа, нашиот Секретар за одбрана,
05:52
Secretary Mattis,
he understands that as well,
120
340520
2240
Секретарот Матис, добро го разбира тоа,
05:55
and what he understands
is that climate is a risk.
121
343600
3056
и знае дека климата е опасност.
05:58
He has said so in his written
responses to Congress,
122
346680
2456
Го изнесе тоа во одговорот до Конгресот,
06:01
and he says, "As Secretary of Defense,
123
349160
2136
и вели: „Како Секретар за одбрана,
06:03
it's my job to manage such risks."
124
351320
3416
должност ми е да се справам
со такви ризици.“
06:06
It's not only the US military
that understands this.
125
354760
3936
Не е само Армијата на САД
која го разбира ова.
06:10
Many of our friends and allies
in other navies and other militaries
126
358720
3536
Многу наши пријатели
и сојузници од други воено-морски сили
06:14
have very clear-eyed views
about the climate risk.
127
362280
3776
имаат јасна претстава
за климатската опасност.
06:18
And in fact, in 2014, I was honored
to speak for a half-a-day seminar
128
366080
4296
Всушност, во 2014-та имав чест да зборувам
за овој проблем на еден полудневен семинар
06:22
at the International Seapower Symposium
129
370400
2216
на Меѓународниот поморски симпозиум
06:24
to 70 heads of navies about this issue.
130
372640
2840
пред 70 старешини на поморски флоти.
06:29
So Winston Churchill
is alleged to have said,
131
377200
2576
Винстон Черчил наводно изјавил,
06:31
I'm not sure if he said anything,
but he's alleged to have said
132
379800
3256
не сум сигурен дека е тој,
но така се тврди,
06:35
that Americans can always
be counted upon to do the right thing
133
383080
3936
дека на Американците секогаш може да се
смета дека ќе направат вистински избор
06:39
after exhausting every other possibility.
134
387040
2056
откако ќе ги исцрпат сите други можности.
06:41
(Laughter)
135
389120
1576
(Смеа)
06:42
So I would argue
we're still in the process
136
390720
2216
Јас велам дека ние сме сѐ уште во процесот
06:44
of exhausting every other possibility,
137
392960
1856
на исцрпување на сите други можности.
06:46
but I do think we will prevail.
138
394840
2576
Но сметам дека ќе успееме.
06:49
But I need your help.
139
397440
1456
Но потребна е вашата помош.
06:50
This is my ask.
140
398920
1256
Ова е моето барање.
06:52
I ask not that you take
your recycling out on Wednesday,
141
400200
3456
Не барам од вас да го носите
сметот на селектирање секоја среда,
06:55
but that you engage
with every business leader,
142
403680
2976
туку да се обратите до секој бизнис лидер,
06:58
every technology leader,
every government leader,
143
406680
2816
секој технолошки лидер,
секој владин лидер,
07:01
and ask them, "Ma'am, sir,
144
409520
2576
и да ги прашате: „Госпоѓо/господине,
07:04
what are you doing
to stabilize the climate?"
145
412120
2680
што правите за да
ја стабилизирате климата?“
07:07
It's just that simple.
146
415520
1536
Многу едноставно.
07:09
Because when enough people care enough,
147
417080
3496
Бидејќи кога има доволно луѓе
кои доволно се грижат,
07:12
the politicians, most of whom
won't lead on this issue --
148
420600
3576
политичарите, од кои повеќето не се
занимаваат со овој проблем-
07:16
but they will be led --
149
424200
1776
-само ако се приморани,
07:18
that will change this.
150
426000
1376
тогаш ќе се промени ова.
07:19
Because I can tell you,
the ice doesn't care.
151
427400
4056
Ви велам, на мразот ич не му е гајле.
07:23
The ice doesn't care
who's in the White House.
152
431480
2416
Не го интересира
кој седи во Белата куќа.
07:25
It doesn't care which party
controls your congress.
153
433920
2976
Не го интересира која партија
го води вашиот Конгрес.
07:28
It doesn't care which party
controls your parliament.
154
436920
2576
Не го интересира која партија
го води вашиот Парламент.
07:31
It just melts.
155
439520
1456
Тој едноставно се топи.
07:33
Thank you very much.
156
441000
1216
Ви благодарам!
07:34
(Applause)
157
442240
5920
(Аплауз)

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
David Titley - Meteorologist
Scientist and retired Navy officer Dr. David Titley asks a big question: Could the US military play a role in combating climate change?

Why you should listen

David Titley is a Professor of Practice in Meteorology and a Professor of International Affairs at the Pennsylvania State University. He is the founding director of Penn State’s Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk. He served as a naval officer for 32 years and rose to the rank of Rear Admiral. Titley’s career included duties as commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; oceanographer and navigator of the Navy; and deputy assistant chief of naval operations for information dominance. He also served as senior military assistant for the director, Office of Net Assessment in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

While serving in the Pentagon, Titley initiated and led the U.S. Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change. After retiring from the Navy, Titley served as the Deputy Undersecretary of Commerce for Operations, the chief operating officer position at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Titley serves on numerous advisory boards and National Academies of Science committees, including the CNA Military Advisory Board, the Center for Climate and Security and the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Titley is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

More profile about the speaker
David Titley | Speaker | TED.com