ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com
TEDxBeaconStreet

Nagin Cox: What time is it on Mars?

Nagin Cox: Wie spät ist es auf dem Mars?

Filmed:
2,047,965 views

Nagin Cox gehört zur ersten Generation der Marsianer. Als Raumfahrtingenieurin des Strahlantriebslabors der NASA arbeitet sie für das Team, das die Rover der USA auf dem Mars betreut. Aber das Arbeiten auf einem anderen Planeten – dessen Tag 40 Minuten länger ist als ein Tag auf der Erde – hält spezielle und oftmals komische Herausforderungen bereit.
- Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

Bestimmt haben viele von Ihnen
den Film "Der Marsianer" gesehen.
00:13
So manyviele of you have probablywahrscheinlich seengesehen
the movieFilm "The MartianMartian."
0
1054
3549
00:17
But for those of you who did not,
it's a movieFilm about an astronautAstronaut
1
5141
3817
Für alle anderen:
Es ist ein Film über einen Astronauten,
der auf dem Mars strandet
und dort versucht zu überleben,
00:20
who is strandedgestrandet on MarsMars,
and his effortsBemühungen to staybleibe aliveam Leben
2
8982
4543
00:25
untilbis the EarthErde can sendsenden a rescueRettung missionMission
to bringbringen him back to EarthErde.
3
13549
4496
bis man ihn retten und wieder
auf die Erde zurückbringen kann.
00:31
GladlyGerne, they do re-establishStellen Sie wieder her communicationKommunikation
4
19205
3139
Die Kommunikation wird
glücklicherweise wieder hergestellt,
00:34
with the characterCharakter,
astronautAstronaut WatneyWatney, at some pointPunkt
5
22368
2538
sodass der Held, Astronaut Watney,
nicht allein ist,
00:36
so that he's not as aloneallein
on MarsMars untilbis he can be rescuedgerettet.
6
24930
5271
bis er vom Mars gerettet werden kann.
Egal, ob Sie den Film sehen oder nicht,
00:42
So while you're watchingAufpassen the movieFilm,
or even if you haven'thabe nicht,
7
30726
2762
00:45
when you think about MarsMars,
8
33512
1548
wenn Sie an den Mars denken,
denken Sie wahrscheinlich daran,
wie weit entfernt er ist.
00:47
you're probablywahrscheinlich thinkingDenken about
how farweit away it is and how distantentfernt.
9
35084
4800
00:51
And, what mightMacht not
have occurredaufgetreten to you is,
10
39908
2579
Woran Sie vielleicht
noch nicht gedacht haben:
00:54
what are the logisticsLogistik really like
of workingArbeiten on anotherein anderer planetPlanet --
11
42511
3897
Was sind die logistischen Bedingungen
für das Arbeiten auf anderen Planeten?
00:58
of livingLeben on two planetsPlaneten
12
46432
2246
Für das Leben auf zwei Planeten,
01:00
when there are people on the EarthErde
and there are roversRovers or people on MarsMars?
13
48702
5834
wenn die Menschen auf der Erde und
die Rover oder Menschen auf dem Mars sind?
01:06
So think about when you have friendsFreunde,
familiesFamilien and co-workersco-workers
14
54560
4158
Wenn Sie Freunde, Familie oder Kollegen
01:10
in CaliforniaCalifornia, on the WestWesten CoastKüste
or in other partsTeile of the worldWelt.
15
58742
3158
in Kalifornien, an der Westküste
oder in anderen Ecken der Welt haben,
wenn Sie versuchen
mit ihnen zu kommunizieren,
01:14
When you're tryingversuchen
to communicatekommunizieren with them,
16
62225
2053
01:16
one of the things
you probablywahrscheinlich first think about is:
17
64302
2438
ist die erste Frage wahrscheinlich:
01:18
wait, what time is it in CaliforniaCalifornia?
18
66764
2096
Wie spät ist es Kalifornien?
01:20
Will I wakeaufwachen them up? Is it OK to call?
19
68884
2595
Werde ich sie wecken?
Ist es okay jetzt anzurufen?
01:23
So even if you're interactinginteragierend
with colleaguesKollegen who are in EuropeEuropa,
20
71883
3351
Selbst, wenn Sie nur mit
Kollegen in Europa kommunizieren,
01:27
you're immediatelysofort thinkingDenken about:
21
75258
2042
denken Sie sofort daran:
01:29
What does it take to coordinateKoordinate
communicationKommunikation when people are farweit away?
22
77324
7000
Was muss ich beim Anrufen bedenken,
wenn die Menschen so weit weg sind?
01:36
So we don't have people on MarsMars
right now, but we do have roversRovers.
23
84973
5584
Wir haben im Moment keine Menschen
auf dem Mars, aber wir haben Rover dort.
und zurzeit ist es auf
der Curiosity 6:10 Uhr morgens.
01:42
And actuallytatsächlich right now, on CuriosityNeugier,
it is 6:10 in the morningMorgen.
24
90581
5105
01:47
So, 6:10 in the morningMorgen on MarsMars.
25
95710
2771
Also, 6:10 Uhr morgens auf dem Mars.
01:50
We have fourvier roversRovers on MarsMars.
26
98876
2001
Wir haben vier Rover auf dem Mars.
01:52
The UnitedVereinigte StatesStaaten has put fourvier roversRovers
on MarsMars sinceschon seit the mid-Mitte1990s,
27
100901
4007
Die USA haben seit Mitte der 90er Jahre
vier Rover auf den Mars geschickt
01:56
and I have been privilegedprivilegiert enoughgenug
to work on threedrei of them.
28
104932
3939
und ich hatte das Glück,
mit dreien davon zu arbeiten.
02:00
So, I am a spacecraftRaumfahrzeug engineerIngenieur,
a spacecraftRaumfahrzeug operationsOperationen engineerIngenieur,
29
108895
4521
Ich bin Raumfahrtingenieur
02:05
at NASA'sDer NASA JetJet PropulsionAntrieb LaboratoryLabor
in LosLos AngelesAngeles, CaliforniaCalifornia.
30
113440
4847
im Strahlantriebslabor der NASA
in Los Angeles, Kalifornien.
02:10
And these roversRovers
are our roboticRoboter emissariesAbgesandte.
31
118856
4161
Und diese Rover sind
unsere Roboter-Abgesandten.
02:15
So, they are our eyesAugen and our earsOhren,
and they see the planetPlanet for us
32
123041
6278
Sie sind unsere Augen und Ohren
und sie sehen den Planeten für uns,
02:21
untilbis we can sendsenden people.
33
129343
1833
bis wir Menschen schicken können.
02:23
So we learnlernen how to operatearbeiten
on other planetsPlaneten throughdurch these roversRovers.
34
131200
5293
So lernen wir durch diese Rover, wie
man auf anderen Planeten arbeiten kann.
02:28
So before we sendsenden people, we sendsenden robotsRoboter.
35
136517
4306
Bevor wir Menschen schicken,
schicken wir Roboter.
Es gibt einen Zeitunterschied
von der Mars-Zeit
02:33
So the reasonGrund there's a time differenceUnterschied
on MarsMars right now,
36
141326
3951
zu unserer Zeit,
02:37
from the time that we're at
37
145301
1302
weil ein Tag auf dem Mars länger
als ein Tag auf der Erde dauert.
02:38
is because the MartianMartian day
is longerlänger than the EarthErde day.
38
146627
3974
02:42
Our EarthErde day is 24 hoursStd.,
39
150954
2797
Unser Erdentag dauert 24 Stunden,
02:45
because that's how long it takes
the EarthErde to rotatedrehen,
40
153775
3374
weil die Erde einmal
in 24 Stunden rotiert,
02:49
how long it takes to go around onceEinmal.
41
157173
2001
sich einmal um sich selbst dreht.
02:51
So our day is 24 hoursStd..
42
159198
1912
Deshalb ist unser Tag 24 Stunden lang.
02:53
It takes MarsMars 24 hoursStd. and approximatelyca
40 minutesProtokoll to rotatedrehen onceEinmal.
43
161486
6820
Der Mars braucht 24 Std
und ca. 40 Min, um einmal zu rotieren.
03:00
So that meansmeint that the MartianMartian day
is 40 minutesProtokoll longerlänger than the EarthErde day.
44
168330
6418
Der Marstag dauert also
40 Minuten länger als ein Erdtag.
03:07
So teamsTeams of people who are operatingBetriebs
the roversRovers on MarsMars, like this one,
45
175207
5155
Die Teams, die die Rover
auf dem Mars bedienen,
03:12
what we are doing is we are livingLeben
on EarthErde, but workingArbeiten on MarsMars.
46
180386
5412
leben auf der Erde,
aber arbeiten auf dem Mars.
03:17
So we have to think as if we are actuallytatsächlich
on MarsMars with the roverRover.
47
185822
5465
Wir müssen so denken, als wären wir
tatsächlich mit dem Rover auf dem Mars.
03:23
Our jobJob, the jobJob of this teamMannschaft,
of whichwelche I'm a partTeil of,
48
191654
3579
Unsere Arbeit, die Arbeit
meines Teams, ist es,
03:27
is to sendsenden commandsBefehle to the roverRover
to tell it what to do the nextNächster day.
49
195257
5929
Befehle an den Rover
für den nächsten Tag zu senden.
03:33
To tell it to driveFahrt or drillbohren
or tell her whateverwas auch immer she's supposedsoll to do.
50
201210
4029
Ihm zu sagen, ob er fahren oder bohren
oder was er sonst machen soll.
03:37
So while she's sleepingSchlafen --
and the roverRover does sleepSchlaf at night
51
205553
4466
Während der Rover schläft --
und er schläft bei Nacht,
03:42
because she needsBedürfnisse
to rechargeAufladen her batteriesBatterien
52
210043
2370
weil die Batterien aufgeladen
03:44
and she needsBedürfnisse to weatherWetter
the coldkalt MartianMartian night.
53
212437
3896
und die kalte Marsnacht
überstanden werden muss.
Der Rover schläft also
und während er schläft --
03:48
And so she sleepsschläft.
54
216357
1362
03:49
So while she sleepsschläft, we work
on her programProgramm for the nextNächster day.
55
217743
4768
arbeiten wir das Programm
für den nächsten Tag aus.
03:54
So I work the MartianMartian night shiftVerschiebung.
56
222857
2982
Ich arbeite also in der Mars-Nachtschicht.
03:57
(LaughterLachen)
57
225863
1591
(Lachen)
03:59
So in orderAuftrag to come to work on the EarthErde
at the samegleich time everyjeden day on MarsMars --
58
227478
6628
Um jeden Tag zur selben Mars-Zeit
zur Arbeit auf der Erde zu kommen --
04:06
like, let's say I need to be
at work at 5:00 p.m.,
59
234130
2404
Sagen wir, ich muss
um 17:00 Uhr auf Arbeit sein.
04:08
this teamMannschaft needsBedürfnisse to be at work
at 5:00 p.m. MarsMars time everyjeden day,
60
236558
5569
Das Team muss jeden Tag
um 17:00 Uhr Mars-Zeit da sein,
04:14
then we have to come to work
on the EarthErde 40 minutesProtokoll laterspäter everyjeden day,
61
242151
7000
d.h. wir müssen auf der Erde täglich
40 Min später zur Arbeit kommen,
04:22
in orderAuftrag to staybleibe in syncsynchronisieren with MarsMars.
62
250142
2179
um auf den Mars abgestimmt zu bleiben.
04:24
That's like movingbewegend a time zoneZone everyjeden day.
63
252345
2952
Das ist, als ob man jeden Tag
die Zeitzone ändern würde.
04:27
So one day you come in at 8:00,
the nextNächster day 40 minutesProtokoll laterspäter at 8:40,
64
255321
5455
An einem Tag kommst du um 8:00 Uhr,
am nächsten Tag 40 Min später um 8:40 Uhr,
04:32
the nextNächster day 40 minutesProtokoll laterspäter at 9:20,
65
260800
3269
am nächsten Tag 40 Min später um 9:20 Uhr,
04:36
the nextNächster day at 10:00.
66
264093
1589
am nächsten Tag um 10:00 Uhr.
04:37
So you keep movingbewegend 40 minutesProtokoll everyjeden day,
67
265706
3578
Also verschiebt sich deine Zeit
jeden Tag um 40 Minuten,
04:41
untilbis soonbald you're comingKommen to work
in the middleMitte of the night --
68
269308
2989
bis du irgendwann mitten
in der Nacht auf die Arbeit musst,
04:44
the middleMitte of the EarthErde night.
69
272321
1817
mitten in der Erdnacht.
04:46
Right? So you can imaginevorstellen
how confusingverwirrend that is.
70
274162
3618
Sie können sich vorstellen,
wie verwirrend das ist, oder?
04:49
HenceDaher, the MarsMars watch.
71
277804
2152
Daher die Mars-Uhr.
04:51
(LaughterLachen)
72
279980
1001
(Lachen)
04:53
This weightsGewichte in this watch
have been mechanicallymechanisch adjustedangepasst
73
281005
3518
Die Gewichte in dieser Uhr
wurden so verändert,
04:56
so that it runsläuft more slowlylangsam.
74
284547
2528
dass sie langsamer läuft.
04:59
Right? And we didn't startAnfang out --
75
287099
1889
Wir dachten am Anfang nicht ...
05:01
I got this watch in 2004
76
289012
2226
Ich bekam diese Uhr 2004,
als die Rover noch Spirit
und Opportunity hießen.
05:03
when SpiritSpirit and OpportunityGelegenheit,
the roversRovers back then.
77
291262
3304
05:06
We didn't startAnfang out thinkingDenken
78
294590
1606
Wir dachten anfangs nicht,
05:08
that we were going to need MarsMars watchesUhren.
79
296220
2431
dass wir Mars-Uhren brauchen würden.
05:10
Right? We thought, OK,
we'llGut just have the time on our computersComputer
80
298675
4431
Wir dachten, wir hätten einfach
die Mars-Zeit auf unseren Computern
05:15
and on the missionMission controlsteuern screensBildschirme,
and that would be enoughgenug.
81
303130
3648
und auf den Kontrollbildschirmen
und das würde reichen.
05:18
Yeah, not so much.
82
306802
1381
Ja, das hat nicht gereicht,
05:20
Because we weren'twaren nicht just
workingArbeiten on MarsMars time,
83
308207
2849
weil wir nicht nur
nach Mars-Zeit arbeiteten,
05:23
we were actuallytatsächlich livingLeben on MarsMars time.
84
311080
3159
wir lebten wirklich nach der Mars-Zeit.
05:26
And we got just instantaneouslyaugenblicklich confusedverwirrt
about what time it was.
85
314263
4283
Und wir waren sofort unsicher,
wie spät es gerade ist.
05:30
So you really needederforderlich something
on your wristHandgelenk to tell you:
86
318570
3793
Deshalb braucht man wirklich
etwas am Handgelenk, das einem sagt:
05:34
What time is it on the EarthErde?
What time is it on MarsMars?
87
322387
3291
Wie spät ist es auf der Erde?
Wie spät ist es auf dem Mars?
05:38
And it wasn'twar nicht just the time on MarsMars
that was confusingverwirrend;
88
326107
5894
Nicht nur die Mars-Zeit war verwirrend;
05:44
we alsoebenfalls needederforderlich to be ablefähig
to talk to eachjede einzelne other about it.
89
332025
4769
es musste auch möglich sein,
darüber miteinander sprechen.
05:49
So a "solSol" is a MartianMartian day --
again, 24 hoursStd. and 40 minutesProtokoll.
90
337337
5627
Also, ein "sol" ist ein Marstag --
24 Std und 40 Min.
05:54
So when we're talkingim Gespräch about something
that's happeningHappening on the EarthErde,
91
342988
3195
Wenn wir über etwas sprechen,
das auf der Erde passiert,
05:58
we will say, todayheute.
92
346207
1309
dann sagen wir "today" (heute)
06:00
So, for MarsMars, we say, "tosolTosol."
93
348228
2832
und für den Mars "tosol".
06:03
(LaughterLachen)
94
351084
1838
(Lachen)
06:05
YesterdayGestern becamewurde "yestersolyestersol" for MarsMars.
95
353992
4517
"Yesterday" (gestern) wurde
zu "yestersol" für den Mars.
06:10
Again, we didn't startAnfang out thinkingDenken,
"Oh, let's inventerfinden a languageSprache."
96
358837
4507
Wir haben dabei nicht gedacht:
"Hey, lass uns eine Sprache erfinden."
Es war einfach sehr verwirrend.
06:15
It was just very confusingverwirrend.
97
363368
1290
06:16
I remembermerken somebodyjemand
walkedging up to me and said,
98
364682
2181
Einmal kam jemand zu mir und sagte:
06:18
"I would like to do this activityAktivität
on the vehicleFahrzeug tomorrowMorgen, on the roverRover."
99
366887
3433
"Ich würde dies gern
morgen mit dem Rover tun."
06:22
And I said, "TomorrowMorgen, tomorrowMorgen,
or MarsMars, tomorrowMorgen?"
100
370344
5111
und ich fragte verwirrt:
"Morgen-morgen oder Mars-morgen?"
06:27
We startedhat angefangen this terminologyTerminologie because
we needederforderlich a way to talk to eachjede einzelne other.
101
375987
5052
Wir begannen diese Terminologie,
weil wir einen Weg brauchten zu sprechen.
06:33
(LaughterLachen)
102
381063
1128
(Lachen)
06:34
TomorrowMorgen becamewurde "nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowsolorrow."
103
382215
4276
Tomorrow (morgen) wurde
zu "nextersol" oder "solorrow".
06:39
Because people have differentanders preferencesEinstellungen
for the wordsWörter they use.
104
387216
3615
Die Menschen haben unterschiedliche
Präferenzen bei ihrer Wortwahl.
06:42
Some of you mightMacht say "sodaLimonade"
and some of you mightMacht say "popPop."
105
390855
3376
Einige nennen Sprudel "Soda"
und einige "Pop".
06:46
So we have people who say
"nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowsolorrow."
106
394829
3206
Für einige ist es "nextersol",
für andere "solorrow".
06:50
And then something that I noticedbemerkt after
a fewwenige yearsJahre of workingArbeiten on these missionsMissionen,
107
398562
4724
Nach einigen Jahren habe ich bemerkt,
06:55
was that the people who work
on the roversRovers, we say "tosolTosol."
108
403310
4652
dass die Kollegen des Roverteams,
wir sagen "tosol".
07:00
The people who work on the
landedgelandet missionsMissionen that don't roveRove around,
109
408426
3534
Und die Kollegen der Landungsmissionen,
die nicht herumfahren,
07:03
they say "tosoultosoul."
110
411984
1472
sie sagen "tosoul".
07:05
So I could actuallytatsächlich tell what missionMission
you workedhat funktioniert on from your MartianMartian accentAkzent.
111
413958
4719
Also konnte ich am Marsakzent erkennen,
an welcher Mission jemand arbeitete.
07:10
(LaughterLachen)
112
418701
3250
(Lachen)
07:13
So we have the watchesUhren and the languageSprache,
and you're detectingErkennung von a themeThema here, right?
113
421975
3860
Wir haben also extra Uhren und Sprache --
Sie erkennen einen roten Faden hier, oder?
07:17
So that we don't get confusedverwirrt.
114
425859
1996
Alles, um nicht verwirrt zu werden.
07:20
But even the EarthErde daylightTageslicht
could confuseverwirren us.
115
428419
3807
Aber selbst das Tageslicht
konnte uns verwirren.
07:24
If you think that right now,
you've come to work
116
432669
2339
Wenn Sie sich vorstellen,
sie kommen zur Arbeit
07:27
and it's the middleMitte of the MartianMartian night
117
435032
2095
und es ist mitten in der Marsnacht,
07:29
and there's lightLicht streamingStreaming in
from the windowsFenster
118
437151
3298
aber da ist Tageslicht vom Fenster
07:32
that's going to be confusingverwirrend as well.
119
440473
2148
-- das wird Sie genauso verwirren.
07:35
So you can see from
this imageBild of the controlsteuern roomZimmer
120
443081
2505
Sie können auf diesem Foto
vom Kontrollraum sehen,
07:37
that all of the blindsJalousien are down.
121
445610
2269
dass alle Jalousien
herunter gelassen sind,
07:39
So that there's no lightLicht to distractablenken us.
122
447903
3003
damit da kein Licht ist,
das uns ablenken kann.
07:42
The blindsJalousien wentging down all over the buildingGebäude
about a weekWoche before landingLandung,
123
450930
4352
Die Rollos wurden eine Woche
vor der Marslandung heruntergelassen
07:47
and they didn't go up
untilbis we wentging off MarsMars time.
124
455306
3267
und sie gingen nicht wieder hoch,
bis wir die Mars-Zeit verlassen konnten.
07:51
So this alsoebenfalls worksWerke
for the houseHaus, for at home.
125
459027
3181
Und das gilt auch für Zuhause.
07:54
I've been on MarsMars time threedrei timesmal,
and my husbandMann is like,
126
462232
2773
Ich war dreimal auf Mars-Zeit
und mein Mann sagt:
Okay, wir machen uns
bereit für die Mars-Zeit!
07:57
OK, we're gettingbekommen readybereit for MarsMars time.
127
465029
1815
07:58
And so he'llHölle put foilFolie all over the windowsFenster
and darkdunkel curtainsVorhänge and shadesSchattierungen
128
466868
6202
Also hängt er Folie und
dunkle Vorhänge an alle Fenster,
08:05
because it alsoebenfalls affectsbeeinflusst your familiesFamilien.
129
473094
3147
weil es auch die Familie betrifft.
08:08
And so here I was livingLeben in kindArt of
this darkenedabgedunkelten environmentUmwelt, but so was he.
130
476265
4879
Daher lebte ich in einer
verdunkelten Welt, aber er auch.
08:13
And he'der würde gottenbekommen used to it.
131
481705
1296
Er gewöhnte sich daran.
08:15
But then I would get these plaintiveklagende
emailsE-Mails from him when he was at work.
132
483025
3642
Aber dann bekam ich von ihm immer
diese Emails, wenn er arbeitete.
08:19
Should I come home? Are you awakewach?
133
487257
3292
Kann ich nach Hause kommen?
Bist du wach?
08:22
What time is it on MarsMars?
134
490573
3130
Wie spät ist es auf dem Mars?
Und ich dachte, okay,
er braucht also auch eine Mars-Uhr.
08:25
And I decidedbeschlossen, OK,
so he needsBedürfnisse a MarsMars watch.
135
493727
2498
08:28
(LaughterLachen)
136
496249
1535
(Lachen)
08:29
But of courseKurs, it's 2016,
so there's an appApp for that.
137
497808
4434
Aber natürlich gibt es
2016 eine App dafür.
08:34
(LaughterLachen)
138
502266
1278
(Lachen)
08:35
So now insteadstattdessen of the watchesUhren,
we can alsoebenfalls use our phonesTelefone.
139
503568
4614
Jetzt können wir also statt der Uhren
einfach unsere Telefone benutzen.
08:40
But the impactEinfluss on familiesFamilien
was just acrossüber the boardTafel;
140
508600
4140
Aber die Auswirkungen auf
unsere Familien waren immens.
08:44
it wasn'twar nicht just those of us
who were workingArbeiten on the roversRovers
141
512764
3662
Es betraf nicht nur uns,
die wir mit den Rover arbeiteten,
08:48
but our familiesFamilien as well.
142
516450
2214
unsere Familien waren genauso betroffen.
08:50
This is DavidDavid Oh,
one of our flightFlug directorsRegisseure,
143
518688
2479
Dies ist David Oh,
einer unsere Flugdirektoren.
08:53
and he's at the beachStrand in LosLos AngelesAngeles
with his familyFamilie at 1:00 in the morningMorgen.
144
521191
4474
Er ist um 1:00 Uhr nachts mit seiner
Familie am Strand von Los Angeles.
08:57
(LaughterLachen)
145
525689
1423
(Lachen)
08:59
So because we landedgelandet in AugustAugust
146
527136
2980
Als wir im August auf dem Mars landeten,
09:02
and his kidsKinder didn't have to go back
to schoolSchule untilbis SeptemberSeptember,
147
530140
4446
brauchten seine Kinder
bis September nicht in die Schule
09:06
they actuallytatsächlich wentging on to MarsMars time
with him for one monthMonat.
148
534610
4748
und sie lebten mit ihm
einen Monat lang nach Mars-Zeit.
Sie standen jeden Tag 40 Min später auf.
09:11
They got up 40 minutesProtokoll laterspäter everyjeden day.
149
539382
4769
09:16
And they were on dad'sVater work scheduleZeitplan.
150
544175
2183
Sie lebten nach Dad´s Arbeitszeitplan.
09:18
So they livedlebte on MarsMars time for a monthMonat
and had these great adventuresAbenteuer,
151
546382
3975
So lebten sie einen Monat nach Mars-Zeit
und hatten diese großartigen Abenteuer,
09:22
like going bowlingBowling
in the middleMitte of the night
152
550381
2097
wie Bowling mitten in der Nacht
09:24
or going to the beachStrand.
153
552502
1318
oder an den Strand gehen.
09:26
And one of the things
that we all discoveredentdeckt
154
554149
3359
Wir alle entdeckten,
09:29
is you can get anywhereirgendwo in LosLos AngelesAngeles
155
557532
3988
dass man um 3:00 Uhr nachts
überall in LA hinkommen kann
09:33
at 3:00 in the morningMorgen
when there's no trafficder Verkehr.
156
561544
3553
wenn kein Stau ist.
09:37
(LaughterLachen)
157
565121
1474
(Lachen)
Wenn wir also die Arbeit beendet hatten
09:38
So we would get off work,
158
566619
1192
09:39
and we didn't want to go home
and botherdie Mühe our familiesFamilien,
159
567835
3115
und unsere Familien
zu Hause nicht belästigen wollten
09:42
and we were hungryhungrig, so insteadstattdessen of
going locallyörtlich to eatEssen something,
160
570974
3190
und Hunger hatten, aßen wir
nicht in der Nähe, sondern sagten:
09:46
we'dheiraten go, "Wait, there's this great
all-nightganze Nacht deliFeinkost in Long BeachStrand,
161
574188
3564
"Da ist dieser tolle
24/7-Laden in Long Beach,
09:49
and we can get there in 10 minutesProtokoll!"
162
577776
2242
wir können in 10 Minuten da sein!",
und wir würden da hinfahren.
Es war wie in den 60ern, ohne Stau.
09:52
So we would driveFahrt down --
it was like the 60s, no trafficder Verkehr.
163
580042
2721
09:54
We would driveFahrt down there,
and the restaurantRestaurant ownersEigentümer would go,
164
582787
3755
Wir würden dahinfahren und
die Inhaber würden sagen:
09:58
"Who are you people?
165
586566
2162
"Wer seid ihr?
10:01
And why are you at my restaurantRestaurant
at 3:00 in the morningMorgen?"
166
589421
4173
Warum seid ihr um 3:00 Uhr nachts
in meinem Restaurant?"
10:05
So they camekam to realizerealisieren
that there were these packsPackungen of MartiansMarsmenschen,
167
593958
4890
Und sie würden erkennen, dass es da
diese Gruppe von Marsianern gab,
10:11
roamingRoaming- the LALA freewaysAutobahnen,
in the middleMitte of the night --
168
599661
4665
die die Straßen in LA mitten in der Nacht
unsicher machen würden
10:17
in the middleMitte of the EarthErde night.
169
605288
2023
-- mitten in der Erdnacht --
10:19
And we did actuallytatsächlich
startAnfang callingBerufung ourselvesuns selbst MartiansMarsmenschen.
170
607335
4797
und wir nannten uns tatsächlich Marsianer.
10:24
So those of us who were on MarsMars time
would referverweisen to ourselvesuns selbst as MartiansMarsmenschen,
171
612581
5606
Wir nannten alle Marsianer,
die auf Mars-Zeit lebten,
10:30
and everyonejeder elsesonst as EarthlingsErdlinge.
172
618211
2853
und alle anderen Erdlinge.
10:33
(LaughterLachen)
173
621088
1300
(Lachen)
10:34
And that's because when you're movingbewegend
a time-zoneZeitzone everyjeden day,
174
622412
5695
Wenn Sie sich jeden Tag
eine Zeitzone wegbewegen,
10:40
you startAnfang to really feel separatedgetrennt
from everyonejeder elsesonst.
175
628131
5813
fangen Sie wirklich an,
sich von allen isoliert zu fühlen.
10:45
You're literallybuchstäblich in your ownbesitzen worldWelt.
176
633968
3919
Sie leben buchstäblich
in Ihrer eigenen Welt.
10:50
So I have this buttonTaste on that sayssagt,
"I survivedüberlebt MarsMars time. SolSol 0-90."
177
638704
6925
Ich habe diesen Anstecker, der sagt:
"Ich habe Mars-Zeit überlebt. Sol 0-90."
10:57
And there's a pictureBild of it
up on the screenBildschirm.
178
645653
2745
Und hier ist ein Bild davon
auf der Leinwand.
11:00
So the reasonGrund we got these buttonsKnöpfe
is because we work on MarsMars time
179
648422
5629
Diese Anstecker haben wir bekommen,
weil wir nach Mars-Zeit gearbeitet haben,
11:06
in orderAuftrag to be as efficienteffizient as possiblemöglich
with the roverRover on MarsMars,
180
654075
5049
um so effizient wie möglich
mit dem Rover zu arbeiten,
11:11
to make the bestBeste use of our time.
181
659148
2290
um das Beste aus unserer Zeit zu machen.
11:13
But we don't staybleibe on MarsMars time
for more than threedrei to fourvier monthsMonate.
182
661462
3886
Aber wir leben nicht länger als drei
oder vier Monate nach Mars-Zeit.
11:17
EventuallySchließlich, we'llGut moveBewegung to a modifiedgeändert MarsMars
time, whichwelche is what we're workingArbeiten now.
183
665372
4268
Im Moment arbeiten wir daran, auf eine
modifizierte Mars-Zeit umzusteigen.
11:22
And that's because it's hardhart on
your bodiesKörper, it's hardhart on your familiesFamilien.
184
670379
4657
Weil es hart für unsere Körper
und unsere Familien ist.
11:27
In factTatsache, there were sleepSchlaf researchersForscher
who actuallytatsächlich were studyingstudieren us
185
675060
4882
Tatsächlich gab es sogar Schlafforscher,
die uns untersucht haben,
11:31
because it was so unusualungewöhnlich for humansMenschen
to try to extenderweitern theirihr day.
186
679966
5037
weil es so ungewöhnlich für Menschen ist,
den Tag so künstlich auszudehnen.
Und sie hatten über 30 von uns,
11:37
And they had about 30 of us
187
685327
1290
11:38
that they would do
sleepSchlaf deprivationEntbehrung experimentsExperimente on.
188
686641
3626
mit denen sie Experimente
zu Schlafentzug gemacht haben.
11:42
So I would come in and take the testTest
and I fellfiel asleepschlafend in eachjede einzelne one.
189
690291
3563
Ich kam also, machte den Test
und schlief jedes Mal ein,
11:45
And that was because, again,
this eventuallyschließlich becomeswird hardhart on your bodyKörper.
190
693878
6642
denn irgendwann wird es
wirklich hart für den Körper.
11:52
Even thoughobwohl it was a blastsprengen.
191
700544
3315
Obwohl es auch ein Wahnsinnsspaß war.
Es war eine enorme Erfahrung,
die das Team zusammengeschweißt hat,
11:55
It was a hugeenorm bondingVerklebung von experienceErfahrung
with the other membersMitglieder on the teamMannschaft,
192
703883
4514
12:00
but it is difficultschwer to sustainaushalten.
193
708421
2840
aber es ist schwierig aufrechtzuerhalten.
12:04
So these roverRover missionsMissionen are our first
stepsSchritte out into the solarSolar- systemSystem.
194
712243
6185
Diese Rover-Missionen sind
unser erster Schritt ins Sonnensystem.
12:10
We are learningLernen how to liveLeben
on more than one planetPlanet.
195
718452
5073
Wir lernen, wie wir auf mehr
als einem Planeten leben können.
12:15
We are changingÄndern our perspectivePerspektive
to becomewerden multi-planetaryMulti-Planetengetriebe.
196
723549
5076
Wir ändern unsere Perspektive,
um multi-planetar zu werden.
12:20
So the nextNächster time you see
a StarSterne WarsKriege movieFilm,
197
728943
2795
Also, wenn Sie das nächste Mal
einen Star-Wars-Film sehen
12:23
and there are people going
from the DagobahDagobah systemSystem to TatooineTatooine,
198
731762
3675
und da fliegen Menschen
vom Dagobah-System nach Tatooine,
12:27
think about what it really meansmeint to have
people spreadVerbreitung out so farweit.
199
735461
5490
dann denken Sie daran, was es heißt,
dass sich Menschen so weit ausbreiten.
12:32
What it meansmeint in termsBegriffe
of the distancesEntfernungen betweenzwischen them,
200
740975
3062
Was die große Entfernung
zwischen ihnen bedeutet,
12:36
how they will startAnfang to feel
separategetrennte from eachjede einzelne other
201
744061
3820
wie sie beginnen werden,
sich isoliert zu fühlen
12:39
and just the logisticsLogistik of the time.
202
747905
3224
und wie schwierig das Zeitmanagement wird.
12:43
We have not sentgesendet people
to MarsMars yetnoch, but we hopeHoffnung to.
203
751937
4552
Wir haben noch keine Menschen auf den
Mars geschickt, aber wir hoffen darauf.
12:48
And betweenzwischen companiesFirmen like SpaceXSpaceX and NASANASA
204
756513
3839
Und mit Firmen wie der SpaceX und der NASA
12:52
and all of the internationalInternational
spacePlatz agenciesAgenturen of the worldWelt,
205
760376
3489
und all den internationalen
Raumfahrtbehörden der Welt
12:55
we hopeHoffnung to do that
in the nextNächster fewwenige decadesJahrzehnte.
206
763889
3767
hoffen wir, dies in den nächsten
paar Jahrzehnten zu erreichen.
12:59
So soonbald we will have people on MarsMars,
and we trulywirklich will be multi-planetaryMulti-Planetengetriebe.
207
767680
5825
Bald werden wir Menschen auf dem Mars
haben und wirklich multi-planetar sein.
13:06
And the youngjung boyJunge or the youngjung girlMädchen
208
774000
2412
Und der junge Mann oder das junge Mädchen,
13:08
who will be going to MarsMars could be
in this audiencePublikum or listeningHören todayheute.
209
776436
7000
die zum Mars fliegen werden, könnten
auch hier heute im Publikum sitzen.
13:16
I have wanted to work at JPLJPL
on these missionsMissionen sinceschon seit I was 14 yearsJahre oldalt
210
784201
5602
Ich wollte seit meinem 14. Lebensjahr
an diesen Missionen am JPL arbeiten
13:21
and I am privilegedprivilegiert to be a partTeil of it.
211
789827
2222
und ich bin glücklich,
ein Teil davon zu sein.
13:24
And this is a remarkablebemerkenswert time
in the spacePlatz programProgramm,
212
792073
4054
Dies ist eine außergewöhnliche Zeit
für die Raumfahrt und
13:28
and we are all in this journeyReise togetherzusammen.
213
796151
3174
wir machen diese Reise gemeinsam.
13:31
So the nextNächster time you think
you don't have enoughgenug time in your day,
214
799349
5211
Wenn Sie also das nächste Mal denken,
der Tag hat nicht genügend Stunden,
13:36
just remembermerken, it's all a matterAngelegenheit
of your EarthlyIrdischen perspectivePerspektive.
215
804584
4778
denken Sie daran, es ist alles
eine Frage Ihrer Erden-Perspektive.
13:41
Thank you.
216
809386
1151
Vielen Dank!
13:42
(ApplauseApplaus)
217
810561
4114
(Applaus)
Translated by Dana xyzabc
Reviewed by Angelika Lueckert Leon

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com