ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com
TEDxBeaconStreet

Nagin Cox: What time is it on Mars?

Nagin Cox: Quelle heure est-il sur Mars ?

Filmed:
2,067,551 views

Nagin Cox est une Martienne de première génération. En tant qu'ingénieure de navettes spatiales au Laboratoire de Propulsion de la NASA, Cox travaille avec l'équipe qui gère les véhicules exploratoires sur Mars. Travailler à temps plein sur une autre planète, dont les jours sont 40 minutes plus longs que sur Terre, présente des défis particuliers et souvent comiques.
- Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers. Full bio

Double-click (or triple-click) the English transcript below to play the video.

00:13
So manybeaucoup of you have probablyProbablement seenvu
the moviefilm "The MartianMartien."
0
1054
3549
Vous devez être nombreux
à avoir vu « Seul sur Mars ».
00:17
But for those of you who did not,
it's a moviefilm about an astronautastronaute
1
5141
3817
Pour ceux qui ne l'ont pas vu,
c'est un film sur un astronaute
00:20
who is strandedéchoués on MarsMars,
and his effortsefforts to stayrester alivevivant
2
8982
4543
qui est isolé sur Mars,
et sur ses efforts pour survivre
00:25
untiljusqu'à the EarthTerre can sendenvoyer a rescueporter secours missionmission
to bringapporter him back to EarthTerre.
3
13549
4496
jusqu'à ce qu'une équipe de sauvetage
viennent le rechercher depuis la Terre.
00:31
GladlyUn plaisir, they do re-establishrétablir la communicationla communication
4
19205
3139
Heureusement, la terre parvient
à ré-établir la communication
00:34
with the characterpersonnage,
astronautastronaute WatneyWatney, at some pointpoint
5
22368
2538
avec le héros, l'astronaute Watney,
00:36
so that he's not as aloneseul
on MarsMars untiljusqu'à he can be rescueda sauvé.
6
24930
5271
il n'est donc plus seul sur Mars
jusqu'au moment où on vient le sauver.
00:42
So while you're watchingen train de regarder the moviefilm,
or even if you haven'tn'a pas,
7
30726
2762
Quand vous regardez ce film,
ou si vous ne l'avez pas vu,
00:45
when you think about MarsMars,
8
33512
1548
quand vous pensez à Mars,
00:47
you're probablyProbablement thinkingen pensant about
how farloin away it is and how distantloin.
9
35084
4800
vous imaginez probablement
combien c'est loin, et distant.
00:51
And, what mightpourrait not
have occurredeu lieu to you is,
10
39908
2579
Mais vous n'avez sans doute pas pensé
00:54
what are the logisticslogistique really like
of workingtravail on anotherun autre planetplanète --
11
42511
3897
à quoi peut ressembler la logistique
quand on travaille sur une autre planète,
00:58
of livingvivant on two planetsplanètes
12
46432
2246
quand on vit sur deux planètes,
01:00
when there are people on the EarthTerre
and there are roversRovers or people on MarsMars?
13
48702
5834
quand il y a des gens sur Terre,
et des rovers, ou des gens, sur Mars.
01:06
So think about when you have friendscopains,
familiesdes familles and co-workerscollègues de travail
14
54560
4158
Imaginez vos amis, membres
de la famille, ou des collègues,
01:10
in CaliforniaCalifornie, on the WestOuest CoastCôte
or in other partsles pièces of the worldmonde.
15
58742
3158
basés en Californie, la Côte Ouest,
ou d'autres régions du monde.
Quand on essaie de communiquer avec eux,
01:14
When you're tryingen essayant
to communicatecommuniquer with them,
16
62225
2053
on réfléchit d'abord à quelle heure
il peut bien être en Californie.
01:16
one of the things
you probablyProbablement first think about is:
17
64302
2438
01:18
wait, what time is it in CaliforniaCalifornie?
18
66764
2096
Ne vais-je pas les réveiller ?
01:20
Will I wakeréveiller them up? Is it OK to call?
19
68884
2595
Est-ce raisonnable
de les appeler maintenant ?
01:23
So even if you're interactinginteragir
with colleaguescollègues who are in EuropeL’Europe,
20
71883
3351
Même quand on interagit
avec des collègues en Europe,
01:27
you're immediatelyimmédiatement thinkingen pensant about:
21
75258
2042
on pense immédiatement ceci :
01:29
What does it take to coordinatecoordonner
communicationla communication when people are farloin away?
22
77324
7000
« Comment se coordonner pour communiquer
lorsqu'on est physiquement éloigné ? »
01:36
So we don't have people on MarsMars
right now, but we do have roversRovers.
23
84973
5584
On n'a personne sur Mars, maintenant,
mais on a des véhicules.
01:42
And actuallyréellement right now, on CuriosityCuriosité,
it is 6:10 in the morningMatin.
24
90581
5105
Maintenant, il est 6:10 du matin,
pour Curiosity, sur Mars.
01:47
So, 6:10 in the morningMatin on MarsMars.
25
95710
2771
6:10, donc, sur Mars.
01:50
We have fourquatre roversRovers on MarsMars.
26
98876
2001
Nous avons 4 véhicules sur Mars.
01:52
The UnitedUnie StatesÉtats has put fourquatre roversRovers
on MarsMars sincedepuis the mid-milieu-1990s,
27
100901
4007
Les Etats-Unis ont envoyés 4 rovers
sur Mars depuis la moitié des années 90.
01:56
and I have been privilegedprivilégié enoughassez
to work on threeTrois of them.
28
104932
3939
J'ai eu le grand privilège de travailler
sur 3 d'entre eux.
02:00
So, I am a spacecraftvaisseau spatial engineeringénieur,
a spacecraftvaisseau spatial operationsopérations engineeringénieur,
29
108895
4521
Je suis ingénieure d'engins spatiaux,
ingénieure opérationnelle,
02:05
at NASA'sNASA JetJet PropulsionPropulsion LaboratoryLaboratoire
in LosLos AngelesAngeles, CaliforniaCalifornie.
30
113440
4847
au laboratoire de Propulsion de la NASA,
à Los Angeles, en Californie.
02:10
And these roversRovers
are our roboticrobotique emissariesémissaires.
31
118856
4161
Ces véhicules sont nos robots émissaires.
02:15
So, they are our eyesles yeux and our earsoreilles,
and they see the planetplanète for us
32
123041
6278
Ils sont nos yeux et nos oreilles,
et ils voient la planète pour nous,
jusqu'à ce que nous puissions
y envoyer des gens.
02:21
untiljusqu'à we can sendenvoyer people.
33
129343
1833
02:23
So we learnapprendre how to operatefonctionner
on other planetsplanètes throughpar these roversRovers.
34
131200
5293
On apprend comment être opérationnel
sur d'autres planètes grâce à eux.
02:28
So before we sendenvoyer people, we sendenvoyer robotsdes robots.
35
136517
4306
Avant d'envoyer des gens,
on envoie donc des robots.
02:33
So the reasonraison there's a time differencedifférence
on MarsMars right now,
36
141326
3951
La raison pour laquelle il y a
une différence d'horaire sur Mars,
par rapport à nous, maintenant,
02:37
from the time that we're at
37
145301
1302
02:38
is because the MartianMartien day
is longerplus long than the EarthTerre day.
38
146627
3974
c'est parce que un jour martien
est plus long qu'un jour terrestre.
02:42
Our EarthTerre day is 24 hoursheures,
39
150954
2797
Sur Terre, il y a 24 heures dans un jour.
C'est en effet le temps nécessaire
à la Terre pour effectuer une rotation
02:45
because that's how long it takes
the EarthTerre to rotatetourner,
40
153775
3374
02:49
how long it takes to go around onceune fois que.
41
157173
2001
sur elle-même.
02:51
So our day is 24 hoursheures.
42
159198
1912
Donc, notre jour dure 24 heures.
02:53
It takes MarsMars 24 hoursheures and approximatelyapproximativement
40 minutesminutes to rotatetourner onceune fois que.
43
161486
6820
Mais Mars a besoin de 24 h 40 minutes
environ pour effectuer une rotation.
03:00
So that meansveux dire that the MartianMartien day
is 40 minutesminutes longerplus long than the EarthTerre day.
44
168330
6418
Par conséquent, un jour martien dure
40 minutes de plus qu'un jour terrestre.
03:07
So teamséquipes of people who are operatingen fonctionnement
the roversRovers on MarsMars, like this one,
45
175207
5155
Les membres des équipes qui exploitent
les véhicules sur Mars, comme celle-ci,
03:12
what we are doing is we are livingvivant
on EarthTerre, but workingtravail on MarsMars.
46
180386
5412
vivent sur Terre,
mais travaillent sur Mars.
03:17
So we have to think as if we are actuallyréellement
on MarsMars with the roverRover.
47
185822
5465
Nous devons donc penser comme si
nous étions sur Mars, avec le rover.
03:23
Our jobemploi, the jobemploi of this teaméquipe,
of whichlequel I'm a partpartie of,
48
191654
3579
Notre mission, la mission de cette équipe,
dont je fait partie,
03:27
is to sendenvoyer commandscommandes to the roverRover
to tell it what to do the nextprochain day.
49
195257
5929
est d'envoyer les instructions au véhicule
pour ses activités du lendemain.
03:33
To tell it to driveconduire or drillpercer
or tell her whateverpeu importe she's supposedsupposé to do.
50
201210
4029
On lui dit où il doit aller, ou forer,
et faire ce qu'il doit faire.
03:37
So while she's sleepingen train de dormir --
and the roverRover does sleepdormir at night
51
205553
4466
Durant son sommeil,
le rover dort la nuit,
03:42
because she needsBesoins
to rechargetemps de recharge her batteriesbatteries
52
210043
2370
parce qu'il doit recharger ses batteries,
03:44
and she needsBesoins to weatherMétéo
the colddu froid MartianMartien night.
53
212437
3896
et qu'il doit aussi encaisser
la nuit glaciale sur Mars.
03:48
And so she sleepsdort.
54
216357
1362
Donc, il dort.
03:49
So while she sleepsdort, we work
on her programprogramme for the nextprochain day.
55
217743
4768
Pendant son sommeil, nous,
nous préparons son programme du lendemain.
03:54
So I work the MartianMartien night shiftdécalage.
56
222857
2982
Je fais partie de l'équipe de nuit
martienne.
03:57
(LaughterRires)
57
225863
1591
(Rires)
03:59
So in ordercommande to come to work on the EarthTerre
at the sameMême time everychaque day on MarsMars --
58
227478
6628
Pour me rendre au travail sur Terre,
à la même heure chaque jour, sur Mars,
04:06
like, let's say I need to be
at work at 5:00 p.m.,
59
234130
2404
disons que je dois être
au boulot à 17 heures,
04:08
this teaméquipe needsBesoins to be at work
at 5:00 p.m. MarsMars time everychaque day,
60
236558
5569
mon équipe commence le travail
à 17 heures martiennes, chaque jour,
04:14
then we have to come to work
on the EarthTerre 40 minutesminutes laterplus tard everychaque day,
61
242151
7000
donc chaque jour, on retarde de 40 minutes
notre arrivée au boulot sur Terre,
04:22
in ordercommande to stayrester in syncsynchroniser with MarsMars.
62
250142
2179
pour rester synchrone avec Mars.
04:24
That's like movingen mouvement a time zonezone everychaque day.
63
252345
2952
C'est comme changer
d'un fuseau horaire tous les jours.
04:27
So one day you come in at 8:00,
the nextprochain day 40 minutesminutes laterplus tard at 8:40,
64
255321
5455
Le jour 1, on commence à 8h,
le lendemain, à 8h40,
04:32
the nextprochain day 40 minutesminutes laterplus tard at 9:20,
65
260800
3269
le jour 3, à 9h20,
04:36
the nextprochain day at 10:00.
66
264093
1589
et le jour suivant à 10h.
04:37
So you keep movingen mouvement 40 minutesminutes everychaque day,
67
265706
3578
On retarde notre arrivée
de 40 minutes tous les jours,
jusqu'à ce que le travail
commence au milieu de la nuit,
04:41
untiljusqu'à soonbientôt you're comingvenir to work
in the middlemilieu of the night --
68
269308
2989
04:44
the middlemilieu of the EarthTerre night.
69
272321
1817
le milieu de la nuit terrestre.
04:46
Right? So you can imagineimaginer
how confusingdéroutant that is.
70
274162
3618
OK ? Vous imaginez bien
que c'est compliqué.
04:49
HenceC’est pourquoi, the MarsMars watch.
71
277804
2152
Nous avons donc une montre martienne.
04:51
(LaughterRires)
72
279980
1001
(Rires)
04:53
This weightspoids in this watch
have been mechanicallymécaniquement adjustedajusté
73
281005
3518
Le mouvement de cette montre
a été ajusté mécaniquement
04:56
so that it runsfonctionne more slowlylentement.
74
284547
2528
pour tourner plus lentement.
04:59
Right? And we didn't startdébut out --
75
287099
1889
OK ? Au départ,
05:01
I got this watch in 2004
76
289012
2226
j'ai cette montre depuis 2004,
05:03
when SpiritEsprit and OpportunityOccasion,
the roversRovers back then.
77
291262
3304
quand Spirit et Opportunity
ont atterri sur Mars.
05:06
We didn't startdébut out thinkingen pensant
78
294590
1606
Au départ, on n'imaginait pas
05:08
that we were going to need MarsMars watchesmontres.
79
296220
2431
que nous aurions besoin
de montre martienne.
05:10
Right? We thought, OK,
we'llbien just have the time on our computersdes ordinateurs
80
298675
4431
On pensait que l'heure
sur nos ordinateurs,
05:15
and on the missionmission controlcontrôle screensécrans,
and that would be enoughassez.
81
303130
3648
et sur les écrans de contrôle
suffirait.
05:18
Yeah, not so much.
82
306802
1381
Et bien non, pas vraiment.
Parce que, en fait, nous ne faisions
pas que travailler à l'heure de Mars,
05:20
Because we weren'tn'étaient pas just
workingtravail on MarsMars time,
83
308207
2849
05:23
we were actuallyréellement livingvivant on MarsMars time.
84
311080
3159
nous vivions à l'heure de Mars.
05:26
And we got just instantaneouslyinstantanément confusedconfus
about what time it was.
85
314263
4283
Et cela nous a immédiatement
perturbé sur l'heure qu'il était.
05:30
So you really needednécessaire something
on your wristpoignet to tell you:
86
318570
3793
On avait littéralement besoin
de cette chose à notre poignet
05:34
What time is it on the EarthTerre?
What time is it on MarsMars?
87
322387
3291
pour nous dire l'heure sur Terre,
et l'heure sur Mars.
05:38
And it wasn'tn'était pas just the time on MarsMars
that was confusingdéroutant;
88
326107
5894
Il n'y avait pas que l'horaire martien
qui était confus.
05:44
we alsoaussi needednécessaire to be ablecapable
to talk to eachchaque other about it.
89
332025
4769
Nous avions aussi besoin
d'en parler ensemble.
05:49
So a "solsol" is a MartianMartien day --
again, 24 hoursheures and 40 minutesminutes.
90
337337
5627
Nous appelons un jour martien : « sol »,
et il dure 24 heures 40 minutes.
05:54
So when we're talkingparlant about something
that's happeningévénement on the EarthTerre,
91
342988
3195
Quand on parle de quelque chose
qui a lieu sur Terre,
05:58
we will say, todayaujourd'hui.
92
346207
1309
on dit : « aujourd'hui ».
06:00
So, for MarsMars, we say, "tosoltosol."
93
348228
2832
Si ça a lieu sur Mars, on dit :
« ausold'hui ».
06:03
(LaughterRires)
94
351084
1838
(Rires)
06:05
YesterdayHier becamedevenu "yestersolyestersol" for MarsMars.
95
353992
4517
Hier devient sur Mars : « Hiersol ».
06:10
Again, we didn't startdébut out thinkingen pensant,
"Oh, let's inventinventer a languagela langue."
96
358837
4507
On n'a, bien entendu, pas eu l'intention
d'inventer une nouvelle langue.
C’est qu’on nageait dans la confusion.
06:15
It was just very confusingdéroutant.
97
363368
1290
06:16
I rememberrappelles toi somebodyquelqu'un
walkedmarcha up to me and said,
98
364682
2181
Je me souviens d'une discussion
où mon interlocuteur dit :
06:18
"I would like to do this activityactivité
on the vehiclevéhicule tomorrowdemain, on the roverRover."
99
366887
3433
« Je voudrais faire ça et ça
sur le rover demain. »
06:22
And I said, "TomorrowDemain, tomorrowdemain,
or MarsMars, tomorrowdemain?"
100
370344
5111
Et je réponds : « Demain,
demain sur Mars, ou demain ? »
06:27
We startedcommencé this terminologyterminologie because
we needednécessaire a way to talk to eachchaque other.
101
375987
5052
Nous avons créé cette terminologie
parce que nous devions communiquer.
06:33
(LaughterRires)
102
381063
1128
(Rires)
06:34
TomorrowDemain becamedevenu "nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowsolorrow."
103
382215
4276
Demain est donc devenu : « demasol »
ou « solmain ».
06:39
Because people have differentdifférent preferencespréférences
for the wordsmots they use.
104
387216
3615
C'est un choix personnel de vocabulaire.
06:42
Some of you mightpourrait say "sodaun soda"
and some of you mightpourrait say "poppop."
105
390855
3376
Un peu comme certains parlent de soda
et d'autre de Coca,
06:46
So we have people who say
"nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowsolorrow."
106
394829
3206
chez nous, il y a des gens qui disent
« demasol » et d'autres « solmain ».
06:50
And then something that I noticedremarqué after
a fewpeu yearsannées of workingtravail on these missionsmissions,
107
398562
4724
Après quelques années de travail
au sein de ces missions,
06:55
was that the people who work
on the roversRovers, we say "tosoltosol."
108
403310
4652
j'ai remarqué que ceux qui travaillent
sur les rovers, nous disons : « demasol ».
07:00
The people who work on the
landeda atterri missionsmissions that don't roveRove around,
109
408426
3534
Mais ceux qui bossent
sur des missions martiennes sans rover,
disent : « demasoul ».
07:03
they say "tosoultosoul."
110
411984
1472
07:05
So I could actuallyréellement tell what missionmission
you workedtravaillé on from your MartianMartien accentaccent.
111
413958
4719
Je peux savoir sur quel type de missions
vous travaillez selon votre accent.
(Rires)
07:10
(LaughterRires)
112
418701
3250
07:13
So we have the watchesmontres and the languagela langue,
and you're detectingdétection de a themethème here, right?
113
421975
3860
On a des montres, une langue.
Vous en percevez le sens, n'est-ce-pas ?
07:17
So that we don't get confusedconfus.
114
425859
1996
Le but est de ne pas
s’emmêler les pinceaux.
07:20
But even the EarthTerre daylightlumière du jour
could confuseconfondre us.
115
428419
3807
Cependant, même la journée
terrestre nous perturbe.
07:24
If you think that right now,
you've come to work
116
432669
2339
Si on vient travailler maintenant,
alors que c'est le milieu
de la nuit martienne,
07:27
and it's the middlemilieu of the MartianMartien night
117
435032
2095
07:29
and there's lightlumière streamingdiffusion in
from the windowsles fenêtres
118
437151
3298
et que la lumière du dehors
illumine nos fenêtres,
07:32
that's going to be confusingdéroutant as well.
119
440473
2148
cela nous perturbe aussi.
07:35
So you can see from
this imageimage of the controlcontrôle roomchambre
120
443081
2505
Vous constatez sur ces photos
de la salle de contrôle
07:37
that all of the blindsstores are down.
121
445610
2269
que tous les volets sont fermés.
07:39
So that there's no lightlumière to distractdistraire us.
122
447903
3003
Ainsi, la lumière ne nous distrait pas.
07:42
The blindsstores wentest allé down all over the buildingbâtiment
about a weekla semaine before landingatterrissage,
123
450930
4352
On a fermé les volets partout
une semaine avant l'atterrissage.
07:47
and they didn't go up
untiljusqu'à we wentest allé off MarsMars time.
124
455306
3267
Et on ne les a pas relevé
avant notre départ de Mars.
07:51
So this alsoaussi workstravaux
for the housemaison, for at home.
125
459027
3181
C'est pareil à la maison.
07:54
I've been on MarsMars time threeTrois timesfois,
and my husbandmari is like,
126
462232
2773
Quand je suis passée sur le fuseau
de Mars pour la 3ème fois
07:57
OK, we're gettingobtenir readyprêt for MarsMars time.
127
465029
1815
mon mari s'est mis à s'y préparer.
07:58
And so he'llenfer put foilfleuret all over the windowsles fenêtres
and darkfoncé curtainsrideaux and shadesnuances
128
466868
6202
Il descend les persiennes,
et tire tous les rideaux.
08:05
because it alsoaussi affectsaffecte your familiesdes familles.
129
473094
3147
Ça influence aussi nos familles.
08:08
And so here I was livingvivant in kindgentil of
this darkenednoircie environmentenvironnement, but so was he.
130
476265
4879
Je vivais dans un environnement obscur,
mais mon mari aussi.
08:13
And he'dil aurait gottenobtenu used to it.
131
481705
1296
Il s'y est habitué.
08:15
But then I would get these plaintiveplaintif
emailsemails from him when he was at work.
132
483025
3642
Après un moment, il m'envoyait
des mails plaintifs depuis son bureau.
08:19
Should I come home? Are you awakeéveillé?
133
487257
3292
Je rentre à la maison ? Es-tu réveillée ?
08:22
What time is it on MarsMars?
134
490573
3130
Quelle heure est-il sur Mars ?
08:25
And I decideddécidé, OK,
so he needsBesoins a MarsMars watch.
135
493727
2498
J'ai décidé de lui offrir
une montre martienne.
08:28
(LaughterRires)
136
496249
1535
(Rires)
08:29
But of coursecours, it's 2016,
so there's an appapplication for that.
137
497808
4434
Nous sommes en 2016, et aujourd'hui
il y a une appli pour ça.
08:34
(LaughterRires)
138
502266
1278
(Rires)
08:35
So now insteadau lieu of the watchesmontres,
we can alsoaussi use our phonesTéléphones.
139
503568
4614
On peut donc remplacer nos montres
par notre téléphone.
08:40
But the impactimpact on familiesdes familles
was just acrossà travers the boardplanche;
140
508600
4140
Mais l'impact sur la famille
était général.
08:44
it wasn'tn'était pas just those of us
who were workingtravail on the roversRovers
141
512764
3662
Pas uniquement ceux
qui travaillaient avec les rovers.
08:48
but our familiesdes familles as well.
142
516450
2214
Nos familles aussi.
08:50
This is DavidDavid Oh,
one of our flightvol directorsadministrateurs,
143
518688
2479
Voici David Oh,
un de nos directeurs de vol.
08:53
and he's at the beachplage in LosLos AngelesAngeles
with his familyfamille at 1:00 in the morningMatin.
144
521191
4474
il est sur la plage à Los Angeles,
avec sa famille, à 1h du matin.
08:57
(LaughterRires)
145
525689
1423
(Rires)
08:59
So because we landeda atterri in AugustAoût
146
527136
2980
On a atterri sur Mars en août,
09:02
and his kidsdes gamins didn't have to go back
to schoolécole untiljusqu'à SeptemberSeptembre,
147
530140
4446
et les enfants n'allaient pas
à l'école avant septembre.
09:06
they actuallyréellement wentest allé on to MarsMars time
with him for one monthmois.
148
534610
4748
Ils ont donc vécu à l'heure de Mars
avec lui, pendant un mois.
09:11
They got up 40 minutesminutes laterplus tard everychaque day.
149
539382
4769
Ils se levaient avec 40 minutes de délai
tous les jours.
09:16
And they were on dad'sPapa work scheduleprogramme.
150
544175
2183
Ils étaient synchrones avec leur père.
09:18
So they livedvivait on MarsMars time for a monthmois
and had these great adventuresaventures,
151
546382
3975
Ils ont vécu à l'heure de Mars pendant
un mois et ont eu plein d'aventures,
09:22
like going bowlingquilles
in the middlemilieu of the night
152
550381
2097
un bowling au milieu de la nuit,
09:24
or going to the beachplage.
153
552502
1318
ou aller à la plage.
09:26
And one of the things
that we all discovereddécouvert
154
554149
3359
Et s'il y a bien une chose
que nous avons tous découvert,
09:29
is you can get anywherenulle part in LosLos AngelesAngeles
155
557532
3988
c'est qu'on peut se rendre
n'importe où à Los Angeles
09:33
at 3:00 in the morningMatin
when there's no trafficcirculation.
156
561544
3553
à 3h du matin,
quand il n'y a pas de trafic.
09:37
(LaughterRires)
157
565121
1474
(Rires)
09:38
So we would get off work,
158
566619
1192
Après le travail,
09:39
and we didn't want to go home
and botherpas la peine our familiesdes familles,
159
567835
3115
on ne voulait pas rentrer à la maison
et gêner nos familles.
09:42
and we were hungryaffamé, so insteadau lieu of
going locallylocalement to eatmanger something,
160
570974
3190
Mais on avait faim.
Au lieu de manger à proximité,
09:46
we'dmer go, "Wait, there's this great
all-nighttoute la nuit deliépicerie fine in Long BeachPlage,
161
574188
3564
on se disait : « Il y a un super snack
ouvert 24h sur 24 à Long Beach,
09:49
and we can get there in 10 minutesminutes!"
162
577776
2242
et on peut y aller en 10 minutes ! »
09:52
So we would driveconduire down --
it was like the 60s, no trafficcirculation.
163
580042
2721
On roulait jusque-là. Aucun trafic.
Comme dans les années 60.
09:54
We would driveconduire down there,
and the restaurantrestaurant ownerspropriétaires would go,
164
582787
3755
Une fois arrivé, les propriétaires
du restaurant nous demandaient :
09:58
"Who are you people?
165
586566
2162
« Mais qui êtes-vous donc ?
10:01
And why are you at my restaurantrestaurant
at 3:00 in the morningMatin?"
166
589421
4173
Et pourquoi venir à 3 heures du matin
dans mon restaurant ? »
10:05
So they camevenu to realizeprendre conscience de
that there were these packspacks of MartiansMartiens,
167
593958
4890
Ils ont finalement compris
qu'il y avait une meute de Martiens,
10:11
roamingl’itinérance the LALA freewaysautoroutes,
in the middlemilieu of the night --
168
599661
4665
qui roulait sur les autoroutes
de Los Angeles, la nuit,
10:17
in the middlemilieu of the EarthTerre night.
169
605288
2023
au milieu de la nuit terrestre.
10:19
And we did actuallyréellement
startdébut callingappel ourselvesnous-mêmes MartiansMartiens.
170
607335
4797
D'ailleurs, on en est venu
à s'appeler les Martiens.
10:24
So those of us who were on MarsMars time
would referréférer to ourselvesnous-mêmes as MartiansMartiens,
171
612581
5606
Ceux qui étaient sur le fuseau horaire
de Mars, s'appelaient les Martiens,
10:30
and everyonetoutes les personnes elseautre as EarthlingsTerriens.
172
618211
2853
et tous les autres étaient des Terriens.
10:33
(LaughterRires)
173
621088
1300
(Rires)
10:34
And that's because when you're movingen mouvement
a time-zonefuseau horaire everychaque day,
174
622412
5695
C'est du au fait qu'avec le changement
de fuseau horaire quotidien
10:40
you startdébut to really feel separatedséparé
from everyonetoutes les personnes elseautre.
175
628131
5813
on se sent vite isolé du reste du monde.
10:45
You're literallyLittéralement in your ownposséder worldmonde.
176
633968
3919
On est littéralement dans son monde à soi.
10:50
So I have this buttonbouton on that saysdit,
"I survivedsurvécu MarsMars time. SolSol 0-90."
177
638704
6925
J'ai un badge sur lequel il est écrit :
« J'ai survécu à l'heure de Mars. Sol 0-90. »
10:57
And there's a picturephoto of it
up on the screenécran.
178
645653
2745
En voici une image.
11:00
So the reasonraison we got these buttonsboutons
is because we work on MarsMars time
179
648422
5629
On gagne ces badges parce que
nous travaillons à l'heure de Mars
11:06
in ordercommande to be as efficientefficace as possiblepossible
with the roverRover on MarsMars,
180
654075
5049
pour optimiser l'utilisation du rover
le plus possible,
11:11
to make the bestmeilleur use of our time.
181
659148
2290
et optimiser notre temps.
11:13
But we don't stayrester on MarsMars time
for more than threeTrois to fourquatre monthsmois.
182
661462
3886
Mais on ne reste pas plus longtemps
que 3 ou 4 mois sur le fuseau de Mars.
11:17
EventuallyPar la suite, we'llbien movebouge toi to a modifiedmodifié MarsMars
time, whichlequel is what we're workingtravail now.
183
665372
4268
A l'avenir, on utilisera un fuseau de Mars
modifié. On y travaille actuellement.
11:22
And that's because it's harddifficile on
your bodiescorps, it's harddifficile on your familiesdes familles.
184
670379
4657
Car en fait, c'est trop dur
pour nos corps, nos familles.
11:27
In factfait, there were sleepdormir researchersdes chercheurs
who actuallyréellement were studyingen train d'étudier us
185
675060
4882
Des chercheurs spécialisés
dans le sommeil nous ont étudiés,
11:31
because it was so unusualinhabituel for humanshumains
to try to extendétendre theirleur day.
186
679966
5037
parce que c'est si peu naturel
pour des humains d'étirer leurs journées.
11:37
And they had about 30 of us
187
685327
1290
Nous étions 30 personnes
11:38
that they would do
sleepdormir deprivationprivation experimentsexpériences on.
188
686641
3626
sur qui ils réalisent des tests
de privation de sommeil.
J'arrivais au travail, je passais le test,
et je m'endormais systématiquement.
11:42
So I would come in and take the testtester
and I fellest tombée asleependormi in eachchaque one.
189
690291
3563
11:45
And that was because, again,
this eventuallyfinalement becomesdevient harddifficile on your bodycorps.
190
693878
6642
C'est parce que cela devient difficile
pour le corps.
11:52
Even thoughbien que it was a blastexplosion.
191
700544
3315
Même si c'est une expérience incroyable.
11:55
It was a hugeénorme bondingcollage experienceexpérience
with the other membersmembres on the teaméquipe,
192
703883
4514
C'était une expérience forte qui a lié
tous les membres de l'équipe.
12:00
but it is difficultdifficile to sustainsoutenir.
193
708421
2840
Mais c'était à la limite du tolérable.
12:04
So these roverRover missionsmissions are our first
stepspas out into the solarsolaire systemsystème.
194
712243
6185
Avec ces missions de rovers,
nous faisions nos premiers pas
dans le système solaire.
12:10
We are learningapprentissage how to livevivre
on more than one planetplanète.
195
718452
5073
On apprend comment vivre
sur plus qu'une seule planète.
12:15
We are changingen changeant our perspectivela perspective
to becomedevenir multi-planetarymulti-planétaire.
196
723549
5076
On est en train de changer
notre perspective
et devenir multi-planétaire.
12:20
So the nextprochain time you see
a StarStar WarsGuerres moviefilm,
197
728943
2795
Au prochain Star Wars,
12:23
and there are people going
from the DagobahDagobah systemsystème to TatooineTatooine,
198
731762
3675
quand des gens voyagent entre
le système de Dagobah et Tatooine,
12:27
think about what it really meansveux dire to have
people spreadpropager out so farloin.
199
735461
5490
pensez à ce que ça signifie vraiment
d'avoir des gens si éloignés,
12:32
What it meansveux dire in termstermes
of the distancesles distances betweenentre them,
200
740975
3062
en terme de distances entre eux,
12:36
how they will startdébut to feel
separateséparé from eachchaque other
201
744061
3820
en terme de sentiment d'isolement,
12:39
and just the logisticslogistique of the time.
202
747905
3224
et en terme de logistique horaire.
12:43
We have not sentenvoyé people
to MarsMars yetencore, but we hopeespérer to.
203
751937
4552
On n'a pas encore envoyé des gens
sur Mars, mais on espère y arriver.
12:48
And betweenentre companiesentreprises like SpaceXSpaceX and NASANASA
204
756513
3839
Avec des entreprises
comme SpaceX et la NASA,
12:52
and all of the internationalinternational
spaceespace agenciesagences of the worldmonde,
205
760376
3489
et toutes les agences spatiales
internationales dans le monde,
12:55
we hopeespérer to do that
in the nextprochain fewpeu decadesdécennies.
206
763889
3767
on espère y parvenir
d'ici quelques décennies.
12:59
So soonbientôt we will have people on MarsMars,
and we trulyvraiment will be multi-planetarymulti-planétaire.
207
767680
5825
On sera bientôt sur Mars.
Nous serons bientôt multi-planétaire.
13:06
And the youngJeune boygarçon or the youngJeune girlfille
208
774000
2412
Les jeunes filles et jeunes garçons
présents dans la salle
13:08
who will be going to MarsMars could be
in this audiencepublic or listeningécoute todayaujourd'hui.
209
776436
7000
pourraient bien faire partie
de cet équipage martien.
13:16
I have wanted to work at JPLJPL
on these missionsmissions sincedepuis I was 14 yearsannées oldvieux
210
784201
5602
J'ai voulu travailler à ces mission à JPL
depuis que j'ai 14 ans.
13:21
and I am privilegedprivilégié to be a partpartie of it.
211
789827
2222
Je me sens privilégiée d'en faire partie.
13:24
And this is a remarkableremarquable time
in the spaceespace programprogramme,
212
792073
4054
On vit une époque incroyable
pour les programmes spatiaux.
13:28
and we are all in this journeypériple togetherensemble.
213
796151
3174
Et nous le vivons ensemble.
13:31
So the nextprochain time you think
you don't have enoughassez time in your day,
214
799349
5211
La prochaine fois que vous pensez ne pas
avoir assez de temps dans la journée,
13:36
just rememberrappelles toi, it's all a mattermatière
of your EarthlyTerrestre perspectivela perspective.
215
804584
4778
rappelez-vous que ce n'est qu'une question
de perspective terrestre.
13:41
Thank you.
216
809386
1151
Merci.
13:42
(ApplauseApplaudissements)
217
810561
4114
(Applaudissements)
Translated by Claire Ghyselen
Reviewed by Aurelie Goldblatt

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com