ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com
TEDxBeaconStreet

Nagin Cox: What time is it on Mars?

Наджин Кокс: Который час на Марсе?

Filmed:
2,047,965 views

Наджин Кокс — марсианка в первом поколении. Она инженер космического корабля в лаборатории реактивного движения НАСА, работает в команде, которая руководит американскими марсоходами. Но работа на другой планете, где сутки на 40 минут длиннее земных, имеет свои особенности и порой даже комичные моменты.
- Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:13
So manyмногие of you have probablyвероятно seenвидели
the movieкино "The Martianмарсианский."
0
1054
3549
Многие из вас смотрели фильм «Марсианин».
00:17
But for those of you who did not,
it's a movieкино about an astronautкосмонавт
1
5141
3817
Для тех, кто не смотрел:
это фильм об астронавте,
00:20
who is strandedскрученный on MarsМарс,
and his effortsусилия to stayоставаться aliveв живых
2
8982
4543
который, будучи оставленным на Марсе,
пытался выжить,
00:25
untilдо the EarthЗемля can sendОтправить a rescueспасение missionмиссия
to bringприносить him back to EarthЗемля.
3
13549
4496
пока ждал помощь с Земли.
00:31
Gladlyс удовольствием, they do re-establishвосстанавливать communicationсвязь
4
19205
3139
К счастью, его коллегам удалось
00:34
with the characterперсонаж,
astronautкосмонавт WatneyWatney, at some pointточка
5
22368
2538
восстановить связь с Уотни
(так звали астронавта),
00:36
so that he's not as aloneв одиночестве
on MarsМарс untilдо he can be rescuedспасенный.
6
24930
5271
так что он был не так одинок,
пока ждал помощь с Земли.
00:42
So while you're watchingнаблюдение the movieкино,
or even if you haven'tне,
7
30726
2762
Пока вы смотрите фильм,
или не смотрите,
00:45
when you think about MarsМарс,
8
33512
1548
а просто думаете о Марсе,
00:47
you're probablyвероятно thinkingмышление about
how farдалеко away it is and how distantотдаленный.
9
35084
4800
возможно, вам приходит в голову мысль
о том, как далеко он находится.
00:51
And, what mightмог бы not
have occurredпроизошло to you is,
10
39908
2579
Но, возможно, вы никогда
не задумывались над тем,
00:54
what are the logisticsлогистика really like
of workingза работой on anotherдругой planetпланета --
11
42511
3897
в чём суть управления работой
на другой планете
00:58
of livingживой on two planetsпланеты
12
46432
2246
или существования на двух планетах,
01:00
when there are people on the EarthЗемля
and there are roversроверы or people on MarsМарс?
13
48702
5834
когда люди — на Земле,
а вездеходы — на Марсе.
01:06
So think about when you have friendsдрузья,
familiesсемьи and co-workersсотрудники
14
54560
4158
Итак, представьте, у вас есть друзья,
родственники, коллеги в Калифорнии
01:10
in CaliforniaКалифорния, on the Westзапад Coastберег
or in other partsчасти of the worldМир.
15
58742
3158
на Западном побережье
или в какой-нибудь другой части планеты.
01:14
When you're tryingпытаясь
to communicateобщаться with them,
16
62225
2053
Когда вы решили
пообщаться с ними,
01:16
one of the things
you probablyвероятно first think about is:
17
64302
2438
первый вопрос, который
приходит вам в голову:
01:18
wait, what time is it in CaliforniaКалифорния?
18
66764
2096
стоп, а который сейчас час в Калифорнии?
01:20
Will I wakeбудить them up? Is it OK to call?
19
68884
2595
Что, если я его разбужу?
Уместен ли будет звонок?
01:23
So even if you're interactingвзаимодействующий
with colleaguesколлеги who are in EuropeЕвропа,
20
71883
3351
Даже когда вы общаетесь
с коллегами из Европы,
01:27
you're immediatelyнемедленно thinkingмышление about:
21
75258
2042
вы прежде всего думаете:
01:29
What does it take to coordinateкоординировать
communicationсвязь when people are farдалеко away?
22
77324
7000
что нужно для общения с людьми,
находящимися настолько далеко?
01:36
So we don't have people on MarsМарс
right now, but we do have roversроверы.
23
84973
5584
Хотя на Марсе сейчас нет людей,
но там есть вездеходы.
01:42
And actuallyна самом деле right now, on CuriosityЛюбопытство,
it is 6:10 in the morningутро.
24
90581
5105
И прямо сейчас на Кьюриосити
6 часов 10 минут утра.
01:47
So, 6:10 in the morningутро on MarsМарс.
25
95710
2771
Итак, на Марсе утро, 06:10.
01:50
We have four4 roversроверы on MarsМарс.
26
98876
2001
На Марсе четыре вездехода.
01:52
The Unitedобъединенный Statesсостояния has put four4 roversроверы
on MarsМарс sinceпоскольку the mid-в середине1990s,
27
100901
4007
США отправили четыре вездехода
с середины 90-х гг.,
01:56
and I have been privilegedпривилегированный enoughдостаточно
to work on threeтри of them.
28
104932
3939
и я имела честь работать
на трёх из них.
02:00
So, I am a spacecraftкосмический корабль engineerинженер,
a spacecraftкосмический корабль operationsоперации engineerинженер,
29
108895
4521
Я работаю инженером по эксплуатации
космических аппаратов
02:05
at NASA'sНАСА Jetфорсунка Propulsionсиловая установка Laboratoryлаборатория
in LosLos AngelesАнджелес, CaliforniaКалифорния.
30
113440
4847
в Лаборатории реактивного движения
НАСА, Лос Анджелес, Калифорния.
02:10
And these roversроверы
are our roboticроботизированный emissariesэмиссары.
31
118856
4161
Вездеходы на Марсе —
это наши роботы-лазутчики.
02:15
So, they are our eyesглаза and our earsуши,
and they see the planetпланета for us
32
123041
6278
Они — наши уши и глаза. С их помощью
мы наблюдаем за планетой до тех пор,
02:21
untilдо we can sendОтправить people.
33
129343
1833
пока не сможем послать туда людей.
02:23
So we learnучить how to operateработать
on other planetsпланеты throughчерез these roversроверы.
34
131200
5293
Мы изучаем, как исследовать
планету с помощью вездеходов.
02:28
So before we sendОтправить people, we sendОтправить robotsроботы.
35
136517
4306
Прежде, чем мы отправим туда
людей, мы отправляем роботов.
02:33
So the reasonпричина there's a time differenceразница
on MarsМарс right now,
36
141326
3951
Причина разницы во времени
между нами и Марсом
02:37
from the time that we're at
37
145301
1302
состоит в том,
02:38
is because the Martianмарсианский day
is longerдольше than the EarthЗемля day.
38
146627
3974
что марсианские сутки длиннее земных.
02:42
Our EarthЗемля day is 24 hoursчасов,
39
150954
2797
На Земле сутки составляют 24 часа —
02:45
because that's how long it takes
the EarthЗемля to rotateвращаться,
40
153775
3374
именно столько времени требуется,
чтобы Земля совершила один оборот
02:49
how long it takes to go around onceодин раз.
41
157173
2001
вокруг своей оси.
02:51
So our day is 24 hoursчасов.
42
159198
1912
Итак, наши сутки — 24 часа.
02:53
It takes MarsМарс 24 hoursчасов and approximatelyпримерно
40 minutesминут to rotateвращаться onceодин раз.
43
161486
6820
Чтобы совершить 1 оборот вокруг оси,
Марсу требуется 24 часа 40 минут.
03:00
So that meansозначает that the Martianмарсианский day
is 40 minutesминут longerдольше than the EarthЗемля day.
44
168330
6418
Это означает, что марсианские
сутки на 40 минут длиннее земных.
03:07
So teamsкоманды of people who are operatingоперационная
the roversроверы on MarsМарс, like this one,
45
175207
5155
Учёные управляют такими вездеходами,
как тот, о котором идёт речь.
03:12
what we are doing is we are livingживой
on EarthЗемля, but workingза работой on MarsМарс.
46
180386
5412
Суть нашей работы в том, что мы
живём на Земле, а работаем на Марсе.
03:17
So we have to think as if we are actuallyна самом деле
on MarsМарс with the roverпират.
47
185822
5465
Соответственно, мы должны мыслить
так, как если бы мы жили на Марсе.
03:23
Our jobработа, the jobработа of this teamкоманда,
of whichкоторый I'm a partчасть of,
48
191654
3579
Наша работа, работа нашей команды,
частью которой являюсь и я, в том,
03:27
is to sendОтправить commandsкоманды to the roverпират
to tell it what to do the nextследующий day.
49
195257
5929
чтобы отправлять вездеходу команды,
сообщать ему, что делать завтра.
03:33
To tell it to driveводить машину or drillдрель
or tell her whateverбез разницы she's supposedпредполагаемый to do.
50
201210
4029
Сообщать ему, что он должен двигаться,
бурить грунт или выполнять другое задание.
03:37
So while she's sleepingспать --
and the roverпират does sleepспать at night
51
205553
4466
Поэтому, пока команда спит,
вездеход тоже бездействует,
03:42
because she needsпотребности
to rechargeперезарядка her batteriesбатареи
52
210043
2370
потому что ему
нужно зарядить аккумуляторы,
03:44
and she needsпотребности to weatherПогода
the coldхолодно Martianмарсианский night.
53
212437
3896
ему необходимо выдержать
холодную марсианскую ночь.
03:48
And so she sleepsспит.
54
216357
1362
И поэтому он спит.
03:49
So while she sleepsспит, we work
on her programпрограмма for the nextследующий day.
55
217743
4768
Поэтому пока он спит, мы работаем
над программами для следующего дня.
03:54
So I work the Martianмарсианский night shiftсдвиг.
56
222857
2982
Можно сказать, я работаю
марсианскую рабочую смену.
03:57
(LaughterСмех)
57
225863
1591
(Смех)
03:59
So in orderзаказ to come to work on the EarthЗемля
at the sameодна и та же time everyкаждый day on MarsМарс --
58
227478
6628
Поэтому, чтобы начать работу на Земле
в одно и то же время, что и на Марсе —
04:06
like, let's say I need to be
at work at 5:00 p.m.,
59
234130
2404
возьмём, к примеру, начало
работы в 5 часов вечера —
04:08
this teamкоманда needsпотребности to be at work
at 5:00 p.m. MarsМарс time everyкаждый day,
60
236558
5569
команда должна начать свою работу
в 5 часов вечера по марсианскому времени.
04:14
then we have to come to work
on the EarthЗемля 40 minutesминут laterпозже everyкаждый day,
61
242151
7000
То есть каждый день мы должны начинать
работу на Земле на 40 минут позже,
04:22
in orderзаказ to stayоставаться in syncсинхронизировать with MarsМарс.
62
250142
2179
чтобы время совпадало с марсианским.
04:24
That's like movingперемещение a time zoneзона everyкаждый day.
63
252345
2952
Это похоже на ежедневную
смену часовых поясов.
04:27
So one day you come in at 8:00,
the nextследующий day 40 minutesминут laterпозже at 8:40,
64
255321
5455
Итак, сегодня вы прихóдите на работу
в 8:00, завтра на 40 минут позже — в 8:40,
04:32
the nextследующий day 40 minutesминут laterпозже at 9:20,
65
260800
3269
на следующий день
ещё на 40 минут позже — в 9:20.
04:36
the nextследующий day at 10:00.
66
264093
1589
На следующий день — в 10:00.
04:37
So you keep movingперемещение 40 minutesминут everyкаждый day,
67
265706
3578
Каждый день вы сдвигаетесь на 40 минут,
04:41
untilдо soonскоро you're comingприход to work
in the middleсредний of the night --
68
269308
2989
пока ваша работа не будет
начинаться в середине ночи —
04:44
the middleсредний of the EarthЗемля night.
69
272321
1817
в середине ночи по земному времени.
04:46
Right? So you can imagineпредставить
how confusingзапутанным that is.
70
274162
3618
Правильно? Можете представить,
насколько это странно.
04:49
Henceследовательно, the MarsМарс watch.
71
277804
2152
Итак, мне нужны марсианские часы.
04:51
(LaughterСмех)
72
279980
1001
(Смех)
04:53
This weightsвеса in this watch
have been mechanicallyмашинально adjustedотрегулированный
73
281005
3518
Это механические часы,
отрегулированные таким образом,
04:56
so that it runsработает more slowlyмедленно.
74
284547
2528
что они работают медленнее.
04:59
Right? And we didn't startНачало out --
75
287099
1889
Правильно? И в начале мы не думали —
05:01
I got this watch in 2004
76
289012
2226
я получила эти часы в 2004 году,
05:03
when SpiritДух and OpportunityВозможность,
the roversроверы back then.
77
291262
3304
когда вездеходы Спирит и Опортьюнити
вернулись на Землю —
05:06
We didn't startНачало out thinkingмышление
78
294590
1606
тогда мы не думали,
05:08
that we were going to need MarsМарс watchesчасы.
79
296220
2431
что нам понадобятся марсианские часы.
05:10
Right? We thought, OK,
we'llЧто ж just have the time on our computersкомпьютеры
80
298675
4431
Ведь так? Мы подумали: «Хорошо,
у нас есть часы в компьютерах
05:15
and on the missionмиссия controlконтроль screensэкраны,
and that would be enoughдостаточно.
81
303130
3648
и на мониторах, контролирующих миссию,
этого вполне достаточно».
05:18
Yeah, not so much.
82
306802
1381
А вот и нет.
05:20
Because we weren'tне было just
workingза работой on MarsМарс time,
83
308207
2849
Потому что мы не просто
работали по марсианскому времени,
05:23
we were actuallyна самом деле livingживой on MarsМарс time.
84
311080
3159
мы практически жили
по марсианскому времени.
05:26
And we got just instantaneouslyмгновенно confusedсмущенный
about what time it was.
85
314263
4283
И мы мгновенно запутались,
который же час был на самом деле.
05:30
So you really neededнеобходимый something
on your wristзапястье to tell you:
86
318570
3793
Поэтому хорошо было иметь на руке что-то,
что будет отвечать на вопросы:
05:34
What time is it on the EarthЗемля?
What time is it on MarsМарс?
87
322387
3291
«Который сейчас час на Земле?»,
«Который сейчас час на Марсе?»
05:38
And it wasn'tне было just the time on MarsМарс
that was confusingзапутанным;
88
326107
5894
Но путаница произошла не только в том,
как определять время на Марсе.
05:44
we alsoтакже neededнеобходимый to be ableв состоянии
to talk to eachкаждый other about it.
89
332025
4769
Нам нужно было ещё и каким-то
образом это выражать словами.
05:49
So a "solзоль" is a Martianмарсианский day --
again, 24 hoursчасов and 40 minutesминут.
90
337337
5627
Итак, «сол» — это марсианские сутки,
их продолжительность 24 часа 40 минут.
05:54
So when we're talkingговорящий about something
that's happeningпроисходит on the EarthЗемля,
91
342988
3195
Поэтому, когда мы говорим о каком-либо
событии на Земле —
05:58
we will say, todayCегодня.
92
346207
1309
мы говорим «сегодня».
06:00
So, for MarsМарс, we say, "tosolтосол."
93
348228
2832
А на Марсе это было бы «сегосола».
06:03
(LaughterСмех)
94
351084
1838
(Смех)
06:05
YesterdayВчера becameстал "yestersolyestersol" for MarsМарс.
95
353992
4517
«Вчера» — по-марсиански «пресол».
06:10
Again, we didn't startНачало out thinkingмышление,
"Oh, let's inventвыдумывать a languageязык."
96
358837
4507
И опять же — мы не подумали:
«А давайте изобретём язык».
06:15
It was just very confusingзапутанным.
97
363368
1290
Иначе мы просто путались.
06:16
I rememberзапомнить somebodyкто-то
walkedходил up to me and said,
98
364682
2181
Помню, кто-то подошёл ко мне и сказал:
06:18
"I would like to do this activityМероприятия
on the vehicleсредство передвижения tomorrowзавтра, on the roverпират."
99
366887
3433
«Я хотел бы завтра сделать
то-то и то-то на вездеходе».
06:22
And I said, "TomorrowЗавтра, tomorrowзавтра,
or MarsМарс, tomorrowзавтра?"
100
370344
5111
Я спросила: «Завтра — в смысле завтра
или завтра — на Марсе?»
06:27
We startedначал this terminologyтерминология because
we neededнеобходимый a way to talk to eachкаждый other.
101
375987
5052
И у нас появилась подобная терминология —
нужен был способ общаться друг с другом.
06:33
(LaughterСмех)
102
381063
1128
(Смех)
06:34
TomorrowЗавтра becameстал "nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowsolorrow."
103
382215
4276
Завтра превратилось
в «послесол» или «солтра».
06:39
Because people have differentдругой preferencesпредпочтения
for the wordsслова they use.
104
387216
3615
Потому что у разных людей
разные лингвистические предпочтения.
06:42
Some of you mightмог бы say "sodaсода"
and some of you mightмог бы say "popпоп."
105
390855
3376
Некоторые из вас скажут: «газировка»,
а некоторые — «шипучка».
06:46
So we have people who say
"nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowsolorrow."
106
394829
3206
Так и у наших учёных: одни скажут
«послесол», а другие — «солтра».
06:50
And then something that I noticedзаметил after
a fewмало yearsлет of workingза работой on these missionsмиссии,
107
398562
4724
И что ещё я заметила, проработав
над этим проектом несколько лет, —
06:55
was that the people who work
on the roversроверы, we say "tosolтосол."
108
403310
4652
учёные, которые работают с вездеходами,
в том числе и я, говорят «сегосола»,
07:00
The people who work on the
landedвысадился missionsмиссии that don't roveстранствовать around,
109
408426
3534
а те, которые занимаются миссиями
на месте, а не передвижением,
07:03
they say "tosoultosoul."
110
411984
1472
предпочитают «сегосоула».
07:05
So I could actuallyна самом деле tell what missionмиссия
you workedработал on from your Martianмарсианский accentакцент.
111
413958
4719
Так что о вашей деятельности я могу точно
узнать по вашему марсианскому акценту.
07:10
(LaughterСмех)
112
418701
3250
(Смех)
07:13
So we have the watchesчасы and the languageязык,
and you're detectingобнаружения a themeтема here, right?
113
421975
3860
Теперь у нас есть и часы, и язык,
и вы понимаете, о чём речь, не так ли?
07:17
So that we don't get confusedсмущенный.
114
425859
1996
Теперь мы не запутаемся.
07:20
But even the EarthЗемля daylightдневной свет
could confuseспутать us.
115
428419
3807
Но даже световой день на Земле
может нас запутать.
07:24
If you think that right now,
you've come to work
116
432669
2339
Итак, представьте:
вы пришли на работу
07:27
and it's the middleсредний of the Martianмарсианский night
117
435032
2095
в середине ночи по марсианскому времени,
07:29
and there's lightлегкий streamingпотоковый in
from the windowsокна
118
437151
3298
а сквозь окна пробивается свет,
07:32
that's going to be confusingзапутанным as well.
119
440473
2148
это уже само по себе странно.
07:35
So you can see from
this imageобраз of the controlконтроль roomкомната
120
443081
2505
На этом фото из центра
управления вы видите,
07:37
that all of the blindsшторы are down.
121
445610
2269
что жалюзи опущены.
07:39
So that there's no lightлегкий to distractотвлекать us.
122
447903
3003
Это сделано для того, чтобы свет
не отвлекал нас от работы.
07:42
The blindsшторы wentотправился down all over the buildingздание
about a weekнеделю before landingпосадка,
123
450930
4352
Жалюзи опущены во всём здании в течение
около недели перед высадкой на Марс,
07:47
and they didn't go up
untilдо we wentотправился off MarsМарс time.
124
455306
3267
и мы их не поднимаем,
пока не выйдем из марсианского времени.
07:51
So this alsoтакже worksработает
for the houseдом, for at home.
125
459027
3181
То же самое и когда ты находишься дома.
07:54
I've been on MarsМарс time threeтри timesраз,
and my husbandмуж is like,
126
462232
2773
Я жила по марсианскому времени
три раза, и мой муж говорил:
07:57
OK, we're gettingполучение readyготов for MarsМарс time.
127
465029
1815
«Ок. Мы готовы к высадке на Марс».
07:58
And so he'llад put foilфольга all over the windowsокна
and darkтемно curtainsшторы and shadesоттенков
128
466868
6202
И он вешал фольгу на окна,
и задёргивал шторы,
08:05
because it alsoтакже affectsвлияет your familiesсемьи.
129
473094
3147
потому что всё это не может оставить
твою семью безучастной.
08:08
And so here I was livingживой in kindсвоего рода of
this darkenedзатемненный environmentОкружающая среда, but so was he.
130
476265
4879
Получается, дома я жила в некоем подобии
тёмного пространства, и мой муж тоже.
08:13
And he'dон gottenполученный used to it.
131
481705
1296
И он привык к этому.
08:15
But then I would get these plaintiveжалобный
emailsэлектронная почта from him when he was at work.
132
483025
3642
Но вскоре я начала получать от него
жалобные письма по электронной почте:
08:19
Should I come home? Are you awakeбодрствующий?
133
487257
3292
«Мне уже можно возвращаться домой?
Ты не спишь?
08:22
What time is it on MarsМарс?
134
490573
3130
Который сейчас час на Марсе?»
08:25
And I decidedприняли решение, OK,
so he needsпотребности a MarsМарс watch.
135
493727
2498
И я решила: «Всё ясно.
Ему нужны марсианские часы».
08:28
(LaughterСмех)
136
496249
1535
(Смех)
08:29
But of courseкурс, it's 2016,
so there's an appприложение for that.
137
497808
4434
Но так как сейчас 2016 год —
для этого существует приложение.
08:34
(LaughterСмех)
138
502266
1278
(Смех)
08:35
So now insteadвместо of the watchesчасы,
we can alsoтакже use our phonesтелефоны.
139
503568
4614
Сейчас вместо часов мы
можем использовать смартфоны.
08:40
But the impactвлияние on familiesсемьи
was just acrossчерез the boardдоска;
140
508600
4140
Но влияние на семью огромно,
08:44
it wasn'tне было just those of us
who were workingза работой on the roversроверы
141
512764
3662
оно касается не только тех, кто работает
непосредственно с вездеходами,
08:48
but our familiesсемьи as well.
142
516450
2214
но и всех остальных членов наших семей.
08:50
This is DavidДэвид Oh,
one of our flightрейс directorsдиректора,
143
518688
2479
Например, Дэвид Оу,
один из руководителей полёта,
08:53
and he's at the beachпляж in LosLos AngelesАнджелес
with his familyсемья at 1:00 in the morningутро.
144
521191
4474
вместе со своей семьёй отдыхает
на пляже в Лос Анджелесе в час ночи.
08:57
(LaughterСмех)
145
525689
1423
(Смех)
08:59
So because we landedвысадился in Augustавгустейший
146
527136
2980
Так как высадка была
осуществлена в августе,
09:02
and his kidsДети didn't have to go back
to schoolшкола untilдо Septemberсентябрь,
147
530140
4446
а его дети до сентября
ещё на каникулах —
09:06
they actuallyна самом деле wentотправился on to MarsМарс time
with him for one monthмесяц.
148
534610
4748
фактически они жили вместе с ним
по марсианскому времени целый месяц.
09:11
They got up 40 minutesминут laterпозже everyкаждый day.
149
539382
4769
Каждый день они просыпались
на 40 минут позже предыдущего.
09:16
And they were on dad'sпапа work scheduleграфик.
150
544175
2183
И они жили по рабочему расписанию отца.
09:18
So they livedжил on MarsМарс time for a monthмесяц
and had these great adventuresприключения,
151
546382
3975
То есть целый марсианский месяц
был насыщен приключениями, как то:
09:22
like going bowlingбоулинг
in the middleсредний of the night
152
550381
2097
игра в боулинг среди ночи
09:24
or going to the beachпляж.
153
552502
1318
или отдых на пляже.
09:26
And one of the things
that we all discoveredобнаруженный
154
554149
3359
И что мы обнаружили —
09:29
is you can get anywhereв любом месте in LosLos AngelesАнджелес
155
557532
3988
в 3 часа ночи в Лос Анджелесе
ты можешь успеть куда угодно,
09:33
at 3:00 in the morningутро
when there's no trafficтрафик.
156
561544
3553
потому что в это время
на дорогах нет пробок.
09:37
(LaughterСмех)
157
565121
1474
(Смех)
09:38
So we would get off work,
158
566619
1192
В конце рабочего дня
09:39
and we didn't want to go home
and botherбеспокоить our familiesсемьи,
159
567835
3115
мы не хотели идти домой
и беспокоить родных,
09:42
and we were hungryголодный, so insteadвместо of
going locallyв местном масштабе to eatесть something,
160
570974
3190
конечно, мы были голодны, но вместо
перекуса в офисе говорили:
09:46
we'dмы б go, "Wait, there's this great
all-nightвсю ночь deliгастроном in Long Beachпляж,
161
574188
3564
«Эй, постойте-ка, в Лонг-Бич есть
классный круглосуточный гастроном,
09:49
and we can get there in 10 minutesминут!"
162
577776
2242
10 минут — и мы там!»
09:52
So we would driveводить машину down --
it was like the 60s, no trafficтрафик.
163
580042
2721
Мы садились в машину и ехали —
как в 60-е, без пробок.
09:54
We would driveводить машину down there,
and the restaurantресторан ownersвладельцы would go,
164
582787
3755
Итак, мы приезжали,
хозяин ресторана спрашивал:
09:58
"Who are you people?
165
586566
2162
«Кто вы и откуда?
10:01
And why are you at my restaurantресторан
at 3:00 in the morningутро?"
166
589421
4173
И что вы делаете в моём ресторане
в 3 часа ночи?»
10:05
So they cameпришел to realizeпонимать
that there were these packsпакеты of Martiansмарсиане,
167
593958
4890
Позже они осознали,
что мы — группы марсиан,
10:11
roamingРоуминг the LAЛуизиана freewaysавтострад,
in the middleсредний of the night --
168
599661
4665
разъезжающие по шоссе Лос Анжделеса
глубокой ночью —
10:17
in the middleсредний of the EarthЗемля night.
169
605288
2023
глубокой ночью на Земле.
10:19
And we did actuallyна самом деле
startНачало callingпризвание ourselvesсами Martiansмарсиане.
170
607335
4797
И мы сами стали
называть себя марсианами.
10:24
So those of us who were on MarsМарс time
would referобращаться to ourselvesсами as Martiansмарсиане,
171
612581
5606
Все, кто жил по марсианскому времени,
считали себя марсианами,
10:30
and everyoneвсе elseеще as EarthlingsЗемляне.
172
618211
2853
а всех остальных — землянами.
10:33
(LaughterСмех)
173
621088
1300
(Смех)
10:34
And that's because when you're movingперемещение
a time-zoneчасовой пояс everyкаждый day,
174
622412
5695
А всё потому, что когда ты каждый день
сменяешь часовые пояса,
10:40
you startНачало to really feel separatedотделенный
from everyoneвсе elseеще.
175
628131
5813
ты начинаешь чувствовать себя
отрешенным от всех остальных.
10:45
You're literallyбуквально in your ownсвоя worldМир.
176
633968
3919
Ты в буквальном смысле оказываешься
в своём собственном мире.
10:50
So I have this buttonкнопка on that saysговорит,
"I survivedпереживший MarsМарс time. Solзоль 0-90."
177
638704
6925
У меня и значок есть: «Я жила
по марсианскому времени. Сол 0 — 90».
10:57
And there's a pictureкартина of it
up on the screenэкран.
178
645653
2745
На мониторе есть его иконка.
11:00
So the reasonпричина we got these buttonsкнопки
is because we work on MarsМарс time
179
648422
5629
Мы придумали эти значки,
чтобы осуществлять работу
11:06
in orderзаказ to be as efficientэффективное as possibleвозможное
with the roverпират on MarsМарс,
180
654075
5049
марсоходов настолько оперативно,
насколько это возможно,
11:11
to make the bestЛучший use of our time.
181
659148
2290
и как можно рациональнее
использовать наше время.
11:13
But we don't stayоставаться on MarsМарс time
for more than threeтри to four4 monthsмесяцы.
182
661462
3886
Но мы не работаем по марсианскому времени
больше трёх-четырёх месяцев подряд.
11:17
EventuallyВ итоге, we'llЧто ж moveпереехать to a modifiedмодифицированный MarsМарс
time, whichкоторый is what we're workingза работой now.
183
665372
4268
В конечном итоге мы собираемся перейти
на модифицированное марсианское время
11:22
And that's because it's hardжесткий on
your bodiesтела, it's hardжесткий on your familiesсемьи.
184
670379
4657
из-за отрицательного влияния на организм
и неудобств нашим семьям.
11:27
In factфакт, there were sleepспать researchersисследователи
who actuallyна самом деле were studyingизучение us
185
675060
4882
Проводились исследования сна,
при которых нас фактически изучали,
11:31
because it was so unusualнеобычный for humansлюди
to try to extendпростираться theirих day.
186
679966
5037
потому что очень необычно жить
в режиме удлинённых суток.
11:37
And they had about 30 of us
187
685327
1290
Нас было около 30 человек,
11:38
that they would do
sleepспать deprivationлишение experimentsэксперименты on.
188
686641
3626
и нас обследовали
на предмет недосыпания.
11:42
So I would come in and take the testконтрольная работа
and I fellупал asleepспящий in eachкаждый one.
189
690291
3563
Каждый раз я приходила,
выполняла тест и засыпала.
11:45
And that was because, again,
this eventuallyв итоге becomesстановится hardжесткий on your bodyтело.
190
693878
6642
Конечно, это становится большим
испытанием для вашего организма.
11:52
Even thoughхоть it was a blastвзрыв.
191
700544
3315
Хотя это потрясающее время.
11:55
It was a hugeогромный bondingсклеивание experienceопыт
with the other membersчлены on the teamкоманда,
192
703883
4514
Это колоссальный опыт
по умению влиться в команду,
12:00
but it is difficultсложно to sustainподдерживать.
193
708421
2840
но он тяжело даётся.
12:04
So these roverпират missionsмиссии are our first
stepsмеры out into the solarсолнечный systemсистема.
194
712243
6185
Проекты с вездеходами — наш первый шаг
по освоению солнечной системы.
12:10
We are learningобучение how to liveжить
on more than one planetпланета.
195
718452
5073
Мы учимся жить на других планетах.
12:15
We are changingизменения our perspectiveперспективы
to becomeстали multi-planetaryмульти-планетарной.
196
723549
5076
И в будущем собираемся стать
много-планетарными.
12:20
So the nextследующий time you see
a Starзвезда Warsвойны movieкино,
197
728943
2795
А теперь вспомните другой фильм —
«Звёздные войны»,
12:23
and there are people going
from the DagobahДагоба systemсистема to TatooineТатуин,
198
731762
3675
в котором люди перемещаются
из Дагоба системы в Татуин,
12:27
think about what it really meansозначает to have
people spreadраспространение out so farдалеко.
199
735461
5490
просто представьте, как это —
отправлять людей настолько далеко.
12:32
What it meansозначает in termsсроки
of the distancesрасстояния betweenмежду them,
200
740975
3062
Речь идёт о расстоянии между ними,
12:36
how they will startНачало to feel
separateотдельный from eachкаждый other
201
744061
3820
о том, как они будут себя чувствовать
вдали друг от друга,
12:39
and just the logisticsлогистика of the time.
202
747905
3224
и как в этом случае управлять временем.
12:43
We have not sentпослал people
to MarsМарс yetвсе же, but we hopeнадежда to.
203
751937
4552
Пока мы не отправляли людей на Марс,
но надеемся, что скоро это будет возможно.
12:48
And betweenмежду companiesкомпании like SpaceXSpaceX and NASAНАСА
204
756513
3839
В сотрудничестве с SpaceX и NASA,
12:52
and all of the internationalМеждународный
spaceпространство agenciesагентства of the worldМир,
205
760376
3489
а также другими международными
космическими агентствами,
12:55
we hopeнадежда to do that
in the nextследующий fewмало decadesдесятилетия.
206
763889
3767
мы надеемся, что это осуществимо
в ближайшие десятилетия.
12:59
So soonскоро we will have people on MarsМарс,
and we trulyдействительно will be multi-planetaryмульти-планетарной.
207
767680
5825
Итак, как только люди высадятся на Марсе,
мы по-настоящему станем многопланетарными.
13:06
And the youngмолодой boyмальчик or the youngмолодой girlдевушка
208
774000
2412
И какой-нибудь мальчик или девочка,
13:08
who will be going to MarsМарс could be
in this audienceаудитория or listeningпрослушивание todayCегодня.
209
776436
7000
сидящие в этой аудитории,
отправится на Марс.
13:16
I have wanted to work at JPLJPL
on these missionsмиссии sinceпоскольку I was 14 yearsлет oldстарый
210
784201
5602
Лично я c 14-ти лет хотела работать в ЛРД
[лаборатория реактивных двигателей].
13:21
and I am privilegedпривилегированный to be a partчасть of it.
211
789827
2222
И я горжусь быть частью этого.
13:24
And this is a remarkableзамечательный time
in the spaceпространство programпрограмма,
212
792073
4054
Космическая программа сейчас
переживает знаковые времена,
13:28
and we are all in this journeyпоездка togetherвместе.
213
796151
3174
и мы все вместе совершаем это путешествие.
13:31
So the nextследующий time you think
you don't have enoughдостаточно time in your day,
214
799349
5211
Поэтому в следующий раз,
когда вам будет не хватать времени,
13:36
just rememberзапомнить, it's all a matterдело
of your Earthlyземной perspectiveперспективы.
215
804584
4778
просто помните — это имеет значение
только с вашей земной точки зрения.
13:41
Thank you.
216
809386
1151
Спасибо.
13:42
(ApplauseАплодисменты)
217
810561
4114
(Аплодисменты)
Translated by Anton Rudakevich
Reviewed by Alena Chernykh

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com