ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com
TEDxBeaconStreet

Nagin Cox: What time is it on Mars?

Nagin Cox: ¿Qué hora es en Marte?

Filmed:
2,047,965 views

Nagin Cox es marciana de primera generación. Como ingeniera en naves espaciales del Laboratorio de Propulsión a Chorro de la NASA, Cox trabaja en el equipo que maneja los vehículos de Estados Unidos en Marte. Pero trabajar en un planeta de 9 a 5 en otro planeta -cuyo día dura 40 minutos más que el de la Tierra- tiene desafíos particulares y a menudo cómicos.
- Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:13
So manymuchos of you have probablyprobablemente seenvisto
the moviepelícula "The Martianmarciano."
0
1054
3549
Muchos de Uds. habrán visto
la película "The Martian".
00:17
But for those of you who did not,
it's a moviepelícula about an astronautastronauta
1
5141
3817
Pero para quienes no,
es una película sobre un astronauta
00:20
who is strandedvarado on MarsMarte,
and his effortsesfuerzos to staypermanecer aliveviva
2
8982
4543
varado en Marte, y su esfuerzo
por permanecer vivo hasta que
00:25
untilhasta the EarthTierra can sendenviar a rescuerescate missionmisión
to bringtraer him back to EarthTierra.
3
13549
4496
puedan enviar una misión de rescate
para traerlo de vuelta a la Tierra.
00:31
GladlyCon alegría, they do re-establishrestablecer communicationcomunicación
4
19205
3139
Afortunadamente, logran
reestablecer la comunicación
00:34
with the characterpersonaje,
astronautastronauta WatneyWatney, at some pointpunto
5
22368
2538
con el astronauta Watney,
en cierto momento,
00:36
so that he's not as alonesolo
on MarsMarte untilhasta he can be rescuedrescatada.
6
24930
5271
para que no esté en Marte solo
hasta que lo rescaten.
00:42
So while you're watchingacecho the moviepelícula,
or even if you haven'tno tiene,
7
30726
2762
Al ver la película,
o incluso si no la han visto,
00:45
when you think about MarsMarte,
8
33512
1548
cuando piensan en Marte,
00:47
you're probablyprobablemente thinkingpensando about
how farlejos away it is and how distantdistante.
9
35084
4800
quizá piensen en lo lejano
y distante que queda.
00:51
And, what mightpodría not
have occurredocurrió to you is,
10
39908
2579
Y, lo que quizá no se
les haya ocurrido es
00:54
what are the logisticslogística really like
of workingtrabajando on anotherotro planetplaneta --
11
42511
3897
cómo es la logística de
trabajar en otro planeta,
00:58
of livingvivo on two planetsplanetas
12
46432
2246
de vivir en dos planetas
01:00
when there are people on the EarthTierra
and there are roversrovers or people on MarsMarte?
13
48702
5834
con personas en la Tierra
y vehículos o personas en Marte.
01:06
So think about when you have friendsamigos,
familiesfamilias and co-workerscompañeros de trabajo
14
54560
4158
Piensen cómo es cuando tienen
amigos, familiares y colaboradores,
01:10
in CaliforniaCalifornia, on the WestOeste CoastCosta
or in other partspartes of the worldmundo.
15
58742
3158
en California, en la costa oeste
o en otras partes del mundo.
01:14
When you're tryingmolesto
to communicatecomunicar with them,
16
62225
2053
Cuando intentan comunicarse con ellos,
01:16
one of the things
you probablyprobablemente first think about is:
17
64302
2438
una de las cosas que seguro
piensen primero es:
01:18
wait, what time is it in CaliforniaCalifornia?
18
66764
2096
momento, ¿qué hora es en California?
01:20
Will I wakedespertar them up? Is it OK to call?
19
68884
2595
¿Los despertaré?
¿Estará bien que llame?
01:23
So even if you're interactinginteractuando
with colleaguescolegas who are in EuropeEuropa,
20
71883
3351
Incluso si interactúan con
colegas que se encuentran en Europa
01:27
you're immediatelyinmediatamente thinkingpensando about:
21
75258
2042
inmediatamente piensan:
01:29
What does it take to coordinatecoordinar
communicationcomunicación when people are farlejos away?
22
77324
7000
¿Qué se necesita para coordinar la
comunicación cuando la gente está lejos?
01:36
So we don't have people on MarsMarte
right now, but we do have roversrovers.
23
84973
5584
No tenemos personas en Marte ahora mismo,
pero sí tenemos vehículos.
01:42
And actuallyactualmente right now, on CuriosityCuriosidad,
it is 6:10 in the morningMañana.
24
90581
5105
Y justo ahora, para Curiosity
son las 6:10 de la mañana.
01:47
So, 6:10 in the morningMañana on MarsMarte.
25
95710
2771
Entonces son las 6:10
de la mañana en Marte.
01:50
We have fourlas cuatro roversrovers on MarsMarte.
26
98876
2001
Tenemos cuatro vehículos en Marte.
01:52
The UnitedUnido StatesEstados has put fourlas cuatro roversrovers
on MarsMarte sinceya que the mid-medio-1990s,
27
100901
4007
EE.UU. envió cuatro vehículos
a Marte desde mediados de los 90
01:56
and I have been privilegedprivilegiado enoughsuficiente
to work on threeTres of them.
28
104932
3939
y tuve el privilegio de
trabajar en tres de ellos.
02:00
So, I am a spacecraftastronave engineeringeniero,
a spacecraftastronave operationsoperaciones engineeringeniero,
29
108895
4521
Soy ingeniera espacial,
de operaciones espaciales
02:05
at NASA'sNASA JetChorro PropulsionPropulsión LaboratoryLaboratorio
in LosLos AngelesAngeles, CaliforniaCalifornia.
30
113440
4847
del Laboratorio de Propulsión a Reacción
de la NASA, en Los Ángeles, California.
02:10
And these roversrovers
are our roboticrobótico emissariesemisarios.
31
118856
4161
Y estos vehículos
son nuestros emisarios robóticos.
02:15
So, they are our eyesojos and our earsorejas,
and they see the planetplaneta for us
32
123041
6278
Son nuestros ojos y oídos,
y ven el planeta por nosotros
hasta que podamos enviar personas.
02:21
untilhasta we can sendenviar people.
33
129343
1833
02:23
So we learnaprender how to operatefuncionar
on other planetsplanetas throughmediante these roversrovers.
34
131200
5293
Aprendemos a operar en otros planetas
por medio de estos vehículos.
02:28
So before we sendenviar people, we sendenviar robotsrobots.
35
136517
4306
Antes de enviar personas, mandamos robots.
02:33
So the reasonrazón there's a time differencediferencia
on MarsMarte right now,
36
141326
3951
La razón por la que existe una diferencia
de hora con Marte ahora mismo,
con respecto a nuestro horario,
02:37
from the time that we're at
37
145301
1302
02:38
is because the Martianmarciano day
is longermás than the EarthTierra day.
38
146627
3974
es que el día marciano es
más largo que el terrestre.
02:42
Our EarthTierra day is 24 hourshoras,
39
150954
2797
Nuestro día terrestre tiene 24 horas,
02:45
because that's how long it takes
the EarthTierra to rotategirar,
40
153775
3374
porque es el tiempo que tarda
la Tierra en rotar,
02:49
how long it takes to go around onceuna vez.
41
157173
2001
lo que tarda en dar una vuelta.
02:51
So our day is 24 hourshoras.
42
159198
1912
Entonces, nuestro día tiene 24 horas.
02:53
It takes MarsMarte 24 hourshoras and approximatelyaproximadamente
40 minutesminutos to rotategirar onceuna vez.
43
161486
6820
Marte demora 24 horas y
unos 40 minutos en hacer una rotación.
03:00
So that meansmedio that the Martianmarciano day
is 40 minutesminutos longermás than the EarthTierra day.
44
168330
6418
Eso significa que el día marciano
es 40 minutos más largo que el terrestre.
03:07
So teamsequipos of people who are operatingoperando
the roversrovers on MarsMarte, like this one,
45
175207
5155
Así equipos de gente como este,
que operan los vehículos en Marte,
03:12
what we are doing is we are livingvivo
on EarthTierra, but workingtrabajando on MarsMarte.
46
180386
5412
vivimos en la Tierra,
pero trabajamos en Marte.
03:17
So we have to think as if we are actuallyactualmente
on MarsMarte with the rovervagabundo.
47
185822
5465
Tenemos que pensar como si realmente
estuviéramos en Marte con el vehículo.
03:23
Our jobtrabajo, the jobtrabajo of this teamequipo,
of whichcual I'm a partparte of,
48
191654
3579
Nuestro trabajo, el de este equipo,
del cual formo parte,
03:27
is to sendenviar commandscomandos to the rovervagabundo
to tell it what to do the nextsiguiente day.
49
195257
5929
es enviar comandos al vehículo para
decirle qué debe hacer al día siguiente.
03:33
To tell it to drivemanejar or drillperforar
or tell her whateverlo que sea she's supposedsupuesto to do.
50
201210
4029
Decirle que se mueva o que perfore
o decirle qué se supone que haga.
03:37
So while she's sleepingdormido --
and the rovervagabundo does sleepdormir at night
51
205553
4466
Cuando duerme,
y el vehículo sí duerme de noche
03:42
because she needsnecesariamente
to rechargerecargar her batteriesbaterías
52
210043
2370
porque debe recargar las baterías
03:44
and she needsnecesariamente to weatherclima
the coldfrío Martianmarciano night.
53
212437
3896
y necesita sobrellevar
la noche helada de Marte.
03:48
And so she sleepsduerme.
54
216357
1362
Entonces duerme.
03:49
So while she sleepsduerme, we work
on her programprograma for the nextsiguiente day.
55
217743
4768
Mientras duerme, nosotros trabajamos
en su programa para el día siguiente.
03:54
So I work the Martianmarciano night shiftcambio.
56
222857
2982
Yo trabajo el turno nocturno marciano.
03:57
(LaughterRisa)
57
225863
1591
(Risas)
03:59
So in orderorden to come to work on the EarthTierra
at the samemismo time everycada day on MarsMarte --
58
227478
6628
Para poder venir a trabajar en la Tierra
a la misma hora cada día en Marte,
04:06
like, let's say I need to be
at work at 5:00 p.m.,
59
234130
2404
digamos que para estar
en el trabajo a las 17 h,
04:08
this teamequipo needsnecesariamente to be at work
at 5:00 p.m. MarsMarte time everycada day,
60
236558
5569
este equipo debe estar en el trabajo
a las 17 h en hora marciana cada día,
04:14
then we have to come to work
on the EarthTierra 40 minutesminutos laterluego everycada day,
61
242151
7000
tenemos que ir a trabajar en la
Tierra 40 minutos más tarde cada día,
04:22
in orderorden to staypermanecer in syncsincronización with MarsMarte.
62
250142
2179
para permanecer sincronizados con Marte.
04:24
That's like movingemocionante a time zonezona everycada day.
63
252345
2952
Es como mover un huso horario
todos los días.
04:27
So one day you come in at 8:00,
the nextsiguiente day 40 minutesminutos laterluego at 8:40,
64
255321
5455
Un día vienes a las 8, el siguiente
40 minutos más tarde a las 8:40,
04:32
the nextsiguiente day 40 minutesminutos laterluego at 9:20,
65
260800
3269
el siguiente 40 minutos
más tarde a las 9:20,
04:36
the nextsiguiente day at 10:00.
66
264093
1589
el siguiente a las 10:00.
04:37
So you keep movingemocionante 40 minutesminutos everycada day,
67
265706
3578
Te sigues moviendo 40 minutos cada día,
04:41
untilhasta soonpronto you're comingviniendo to work
in the middlemedio of the night --
68
269308
2989
hasta llegar al trabajo
en el medio de la noche,
04:44
the middlemedio of the EarthTierra night.
69
272321
1817
en medio de la noche en la Tierra.
04:46
Right? So you can imagineimagina
how confusingconfuso that is.
70
274162
3618
¿Sí? Ya se pueden imaginar
qué confuso es eso.
04:49
HencePor lo tanto, the MarsMarte watch.
71
277804
2152
Por lo tanto, el reloj de Marte.
04:51
(LaughterRisa)
72
279980
1001
(Risas)
04:53
This weightspesas in this watch
have been mechanicallymecánicamente adjustedequilibrado
73
281005
3518
El contrapeso en este reloj se ajustó
04:56
so that it runscarreras more slowlydespacio.
74
284547
2528
para que se moviera más lento.
04:59
Right? And we didn't startcomienzo out --
75
287099
1889
¿Sí? Y no empezamos...
05:01
I got this watch in 2004
76
289012
2226
me dieron este reloj en 2004
05:03
when SpiritEspíritu and OpportunityOportunidad,
the roversrovers back then.
77
291262
3304
para Spirit y Opportunity,
los vehículos de aquel entonces.
05:06
We didn't startcomienzo out thinkingpensando
78
294590
1606
Al principio no pensamos
05:08
that we were going to need MarsMarte watchesrelojes.
79
296220
2431
que íbamos a necesitar relojes para Marte.
05:10
Right? We thought, OK,
we'llbien just have the time on our computersordenadores
80
298675
4431
Pensamos, bueno, tendremos
la hora en nuestras computadoras,
05:15
and on the missionmisión controlcontrolar screenspantallas,
and that would be enoughsuficiente.
81
303130
3648
y en las pantallas de control de la
misión, y sería suficiente con eso.
05:18
Yeah, not so much.
82
306802
1381
Bueno, no fue suficiente.
05:20
Because we weren'tno fueron just
workingtrabajando on MarsMarte time,
83
308207
2849
Porque no solo estábamos
trabajando en la hora de Marte,
05:23
we were actuallyactualmente livingvivo on MarsMarte time.
84
311080
3159
en realidad estábamos viviendo
en la hora de Marte.
05:26
And we got just instantaneouslyinstantáneamente confusedconfuso
about what time it was.
85
314263
4283
Y estábamos muy confundidos
sobre la hora que era.
05:30
So you really needednecesario something
on your wristmuñeca to tell you:
86
318570
3793
Por eso necesitábamos algo
en la muñeca que nos dijera:
05:34
What time is it on the EarthTierra?
What time is it on MarsMarte?
87
322387
3291
¿Qué hora es en la Tierra?
¿Qué hora es en Marte?
05:38
And it wasn'tno fue just the time on MarsMarte
that was confusingconfuso;
88
326107
5894
Y no era solo la hora en Marte
que nos confundía;
05:44
we alsoademás needednecesario to be ablepoder
to talk to eachcada other about it.
89
332025
4769
también teníamos que poder
hablar entre nosotros sobre esto.
05:49
So a "solSol" is a Martianmarciano day --
again, 24 hourshoras and 40 minutesminutos.
90
337337
5627
Un "sol" es un día marciano,
de nuevo, 24 horas y 40 minutos.
05:54
So when we're talkinghablando about something
that's happeningsucediendo on the EarthTierra,
91
342988
3195
Cuando hablamos de algo
que ocurre en la Tierra,
05:58
we will say, todayhoy.
92
346207
1309
diremos, hoy.
06:00
So, for MarsMarte, we say, "tosoltosol."
93
348228
2832
Bueno, para Marte, decimos "solhoy".
06:03
(LaughterRisa)
94
351084
1838
(Risas)
06:05
YesterdayAyer becameconvirtió "yestersolyestersol" for MarsMarte.
95
353992
4517
Ayer se convirtió en "solayer" para Marte.
06:10
Again, we didn't startcomienzo out thinkingpensando,
"Oh, let's inventinventar a languageidioma."
96
358837
4507
De nuevo, al principio no pensamos,
"inventemos un lenguaje".
06:15
It was just very confusingconfuso.
97
363368
1290
Pero era muy confuso.
06:16
I rememberrecuerda somebodyalguien
walkedcaminado up to me and said,
98
364682
2181
Recuerdo que alguien vino y me dijo:
06:18
"I would like to do this activityactividad
on the vehiclevehículo tomorrowmañana, on the rovervagabundo."
99
366887
3433
"Quisiera hacer esta actividad
en el vehículo mañana, en el rover".
06:22
And I said, "Tomorrowmañana, tomorrowmañana,
or MarsMarte, tomorrowmañana?"
100
370344
5111
Y yo le dije, "¿Mañana, mañana,
o mañana de Marte?"
06:27
We startedempezado this terminologyterminología because
we needednecesario a way to talk to eachcada other.
101
375987
5052
Creamos esta terminología porque
necesitábamos una manera de entendernos.
06:33
(LaughterRisa)
102
381063
1128
(Risas)
06:34
Tomorrowmañana becameconvirtió "nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowMañana."
103
382215
4276
Mañana se convirtió en
"solmañana" o "mañasol".
06:39
Because people have differentdiferente preferencespreferencias
for the wordspalabras they use.
104
387216
3615
Porque las personas tienen diferentes
preferencias con las palabras que usan.
06:42
Some of you mightpodría say "sodasoda"
and some of you mightpodría say "poppopular."
105
390855
3376
Algunos de Uds. pueden decir "soda"
y otros pueden decir "gaseosa".
06:46
So we have people who say
"nextersolnextersol" or "solorrowMañana."
106
394829
3206
Y tenemos personas que dicen
"solmañana" o "mañasol".
06:50
And then something that I noticednotado after
a fewpocos yearsaños of workingtrabajando on these missionsmisiones,
107
398562
4724
Y luego algo que noté después de algunos
años de trabajar en estas misiones,
06:55
was that the people who work
on the roversrovers, we say "tosoltosol."
108
403310
4652
las personas que trabajan
en los vehículos, decimos "solhoy".
07:00
The people who work on the
landedaterrizado missionsmisiones that don't roverecorrer around,
109
408426
3534
Y las que trabajan en las misiones de
aterrizaje y no andan con vehículos,
07:03
they say "tosoultosoul."
110
411984
1472
dicen "zolhoy".
07:05
So I could actuallyactualmente tell what missionmisión
you workedtrabajó on from your Martianmarciano accentacento.
111
413958
4719
Podía saber en qué misión trabajabas
por tu acento marciano.
07:10
(LaughterRisa)
112
418701
3250
(Risas)
07:13
So we have the watchesrelojes and the languageidioma,
and you're detectingdetector a themetema here, right?
113
421975
3860
Y teníamos estos relojes y el lenguaje,
ya estamos detectando un patrón aquí, ¿no?
07:17
So that we don't get confusedconfuso.
114
425859
1996
Para que no nos confundiéramos.
07:20
But even the EarthTierra daylightluz
could confuseconfundir us.
115
428419
3807
Pero incluso la luz del día en la Tierra
podía confundirnos.
07:24
If you think that right now,
you've come to work
116
432669
2339
Si piensas que ahora mismo,
llegas al trabajo
07:27
and it's the middlemedio of the Martianmarciano night
117
435032
2095
y estás en el medio de la noche marciana
07:29
and there's lightligero streamingtransmisión in
from the windowsventanas
118
437151
3298
y entran rayos de luz por las ventanas,
07:32
that's going to be confusingconfuso as well.
119
440473
2148
eso también resulta confuso.
07:35
So you can see from
this imageimagen of the controlcontrolar roomhabitación
120
443081
2505
Pueden ver en esta
imagen del centro de control
07:37
that all of the blindspersianas are down.
121
445610
2269
que todas las cortinas están bajas.
07:39
So that there's no lightligero to distractdistraer us.
122
447903
3003
Para que no haya luz que nos distraiga.
07:42
The blindspersianas wentfuimos down all over the buildingedificio
about a weeksemana before landingaterrizaje,
123
450930
4352
Las cortinas se bajaron en todo el
edificio una semana antes del aterrizaje,
07:47
and they didn't go up
untilhasta we wentfuimos off MarsMarte time.
124
455306
3267
y no se levantaron hasta
que dejáramos la hora de Marte.
07:51
So this alsoademás workstrabajos
for the housecasa, for at home.
125
459027
3181
Y esto también funciona
para el hogar, cuando estás en la casa.
07:54
I've been on MarsMarte time threeTres timesveces,
and my husbandmarido is like,
126
462232
2773
Ya trabajé en hora de Marte 3 veces,
y mi marido se acopla.
07:57
OK, we're gettingconsiguiendo readyListo for MarsMarte time.
127
465029
1815
Bueno, listos para la hora de Marte.
07:58
And so he'llinfierno put foilfrustrar all over the windowsventanas
and darkoscuro curtainscortinas and shadessombras
128
466868
6202
Y pone papel de aluminio en las ventanas,
y cortinas oscuras, y persianas,
08:05
because it alsoademás affectsafecta your familiesfamilias.
129
473094
3147
porque también afecta a las familias.
08:08
And so here I was livingvivo in kindtipo of
this darkenedoscurecido environmentambiente, but so was he.
130
476265
4879
Yo vivía en esta suerte de medioambiente
oscuro, pero también él.
08:13
And he'del habria gottenconseguido used to it.
131
481705
1296
Y se acostumbró a hacerlo.
08:15
But then I would get these plaintivelastimero
emailscorreos electrónicos from him when he was at work.
132
483025
3642
Pero luego recibía estos mails
quejumbrosos suyos desde el trabajo.
08:19
Should I come home? Are you awakedespierto?
133
487257
3292
¿Debería volver a casa?
¿Estás despierta?
08:22
What time is it on MarsMarte?
134
490573
3130
¿Qué hora es en Marte?
08:25
And I decideddecidido, OK,
so he needsnecesariamente a MarsMarte watch.
135
493727
2498
Y lo pensé, bueno,
él necesita un reloj de Marte.
08:28
(LaughterRisa)
136
496249
1535
(Risas)
08:29
But of coursecurso, it's 2016,
so there's an appaplicación for that.
137
497808
4434
Pero claro, es 2016,
y hay una app para eso.
08:34
(LaughterRisa)
138
502266
1278
(Risas)
08:35
So now insteaden lugar of the watchesrelojes,
we can alsoademás use our phonesteléfonos.
139
503568
4614
Ahora, en lugar de relojes,
usamos nuestros teléfonos.
08:40
But the impactimpacto on familiesfamilias
was just acrossa través de the boardtablero;
140
508600
4140
Pero el impacto en las familias
era a nivel general;
08:44
it wasn'tno fue just those of us
who were workingtrabajando on the roversrovers
141
512764
3662
no solo afectaba a quienes
trabajamos en los vehículos
08:48
but our familiesfamilias as well.
142
516450
2214
sino a nuestras familias también.
08:50
This is DavidDavid Oh,
one of our flightvuelo directorsdirectores,
143
518688
2479
Este es David Oh,
uno de los directores de vuelo,
08:53
and he's at the beachplaya in LosLos AngelesAngeles
with his familyfamilia at 1:00 in the morningMañana.
144
521191
4474
y está con su familia en la playa
de Los Ángeles a la 1 de la mañana.
08:57
(LaughterRisa)
145
525689
1423
(Risas)
08:59
So because we landedaterrizado in Augustagosto
146
527136
2980
Como aterrizamos en agosto
09:02
and his kidsniños didn't have to go back
to schoolcolegio untilhasta Septemberseptiembre,
147
530140
4446
y sus hijos no volvían
a la escuela hasta septiembre,
09:06
they actuallyactualmente wentfuimos on to MarsMarte time
with him for one monthmes.
148
534610
4748
ellos se acoplaron a la hora de Marte
con él por un mes.
09:11
They got up 40 minutesminutos laterluego everycada day.
149
539382
4769
Se levantaron 40 minutos
más tarde cada día.
09:16
And they were on dad'spapá work scheduleprogramar.
150
544175
2183
Y se ajustaron a la agenda
de trabajo de papá.
09:18
So they livedvivió on MarsMarte time for a monthmes
and had these great adventuresaventuras,
151
546382
3975
Y vivieron en la hora de Marte por un mes
y tuvieron estas grandes aventuras,
09:22
like going bowlingbolos
in the middlemedio of the night
152
550381
2097
como ir al bowling
en el medio de la noche
09:24
or going to the beachplaya.
153
552502
1318
o ir a la playa.
09:26
And one of the things
that we all discovereddescubierto
154
554149
3359
Y una de las cosas que descubrimos
09:29
is you can get anywhereen cualquier sitio in LosLos AngelesAngeles
155
557532
3988
es que puedes ir a cualquier
lado en Los Ángeles
09:33
at 3:00 in the morningMañana
when there's no traffictráfico.
156
561544
3553
a las 3 la mañana cuando no hay tránsito.
09:37
(LaughterRisa)
157
565121
1474
(Risas)
09:38
So we would get off work,
158
566619
1192
Al salir del trabajo,
09:39
and we didn't want to go home
and bothermolestia our familiesfamilias,
159
567835
3115
no queríamos ir a casa
y molestar a nuestras familias,
09:42
and we were hungryhambriento, so insteaden lugar of
going locallyen la zona to eatcomer something,
160
570974
3190
teníamos hambre, y en lugar
de comer en un lugar cercano,
09:46
we'dmie go, "Wait, there's this great
all-nighttoda la noche delifiambres in Long Beachplaya,
161
574188
3564
decíamos, "Espera, hay un gran
delicatessen las 24 hs en Long Beach
09:49
and we can get there in 10 minutesminutos!"
162
577776
2242
¡y podemos llegar en 10 minutos!"
09:52
So we would drivemanejar down --
it was like the 60s, no traffictráfico.
163
580042
2721
Y manejábamos hasta allí,
como en los 60, sin tránsito.
09:54
We would drivemanejar down there,
and the restaurantrestaurante ownerspropietarios would go,
164
582787
3755
Podíamos manejar hasta allí,
y los dueños del restaurante decían:
09:58
"Who are you people?
165
586566
2162
"¿Quiénes son estas personas?
10:01
And why are you at my restaurantrestaurante
at 3:00 in the morningMañana?"
166
589421
4173
¿Por qué están en mi restaurante
a las 3 de la mañana?"
10:05
So they camevino to realizedarse cuenta de
that there were these packspaquetes of MartiansMarcianos,
167
593958
4890
Y empezaron a darse cuenta de que
existían estos grupos de marcianos,
10:11
roamingitinerancia the LALA freewaysautopistas,
in the middlemedio of the night --
168
599661
4665
deambulando las autopistas de Los Ángeles,
en el medio de la noche,
10:17
in the middlemedio of the EarthTierra night.
169
605288
2023
en el medio de la noche en la Tierra.
10:19
And we did actuallyactualmente
startcomienzo callingvocación ourselvesNosotros mismos MartiansMarcianos.
170
607335
4797
Y en verdad empezamos
a llamarnos marcianos.
10:24
So those of us who were on MarsMarte time
would referreferir to ourselvesNosotros mismos as MartiansMarcianos,
171
612581
5606
Quienes estuviéramos en la hora
de Marte nos llamábamos marcianos,
10:30
and everyonetodo el mundo elsemás as EarthlingsTerrestres.
172
618211
2853
y todo el resto eran terrestres.
10:33
(LaughterRisa)
173
621088
1300
(Risas)
10:34
And that's because when you're movingemocionante
a time-zonezona horaria everycada day,
174
622412
5695
Y se debe a que cuando mueves
un huso horario todos los días,
10:40
you startcomienzo to really feel separatedapartado
from everyonetodo el mundo elsemás.
175
628131
5813
te empiezas a sentir separado
de todo el resto.
10:45
You're literallyliteralmente in your ownpropio worldmundo.
176
633968
3919
Estás literalmente en tu mundo.
10:50
So I have this buttonbotón on that saysdice,
"I survivedsobrevivió MarsMarte time. SolSol 0-90."
177
638704
6925
Y tengo este broche que dice,
"Sobreviví la hora de Marte. Sol 0-90".
10:57
And there's a pictureimagen of it
up on the screenpantalla.
178
645653
2745
Hay una foto del mismo en la pantalla.
11:00
So the reasonrazón we got these buttonsbotones
is because we work on MarsMarte time
179
648422
5629
Tenemos estos broches porque
trabajamos en la hora de Marte
11:06
in orderorden to be as efficienteficiente as possibleposible
with the rovervagabundo on MarsMarte,
180
654075
5049
para ser lo más eficientes posible
con el vehículo en Marte,
11:11
to make the bestmejor use of our time.
181
659148
2290
para sacar el mayor provecho
de nuestro tiempo.
11:13
But we don't staypermanecer on MarsMarte time
for more than threeTres to fourlas cuatro monthsmeses.
182
661462
3886
Pero no nos quedamos en la hora de Marte
por más de tres o cuatro meses.
11:17
EventuallyFinalmente, we'llbien movemovimiento to a modifiedmodificado MarsMarte
time, whichcual is what we're workingtrabajando now.
183
665372
4268
Nos cambiamos a una hora de Marte
modificada, que es la que usamos ahora.
11:22
And that's because it's harddifícil on
your bodiescuerpos, it's harddifícil on your familiesfamilias.
184
670379
4657
Y es porque es difícil para el cuerpo,
es difícil para la familia.
11:27
In facthecho, there were sleepdormir researchersinvestigadores
who actuallyactualmente were studyingestudiando us
185
675060
4882
De hecho, nos analizaban
investigadores del sueño
11:31
because it was so unusualraro for humanshumanos
to try to extendampliar theirsu day.
186
679966
5037
porque no era común para los humanos
tratar de extender su día.
11:37
And they had about 30 of us
187
685327
1290
Y éramos unos 30
11:38
that they would do
sleepdormir deprivationprivación experimentsexperimentos on.
188
686641
3626
en quienes hacían experimentos
de privación de sueño.
11:42
So I would come in and take the testprueba
and I fellcayó asleepdormido in eachcada one.
189
690291
3563
Entonces, iba a hacerme el control
y me dormía.
11:45
And that was because, again,
this eventuallyfinalmente becomesse convierte harddifícil on your bodycuerpo.
190
693878
6642
Porque, de nuevo, a la larga
se hace difícil para el cuerpo.
11:52
Even thoughaunque it was a blastexplosión.
191
700544
3315
Aunque la pasamos muy bien.
11:55
It was a hugeenorme bondingvinculación experienceexperiencia
with the other membersmiembros on the teamequipo,
192
703883
4514
Fue una experiencia muy fuerte de unión
con los otros miembros del equipo,
12:00
but it is difficultdifícil to sustainsostener.
193
708421
2840
pero es difícil de sostener.
12:04
So these rovervagabundo missionsmisiones are our first
stepspasos out into the solarsolar systemsistema.
194
712243
6185
Estas misiones de los vehículos son
el primer paso fuera en el sistema solar.
12:10
We are learningaprendizaje how to livevivir
on more than one planetplaneta.
195
718452
5073
Aprendemos a vivir en más de un planeta.
12:15
We are changingcambiando our perspectiveperspectiva
to becomevolverse multi-planetarymulti-planetario.
196
723549
5076
Cambiamos nuestra perspectiva
para volvernos multiplanetarios.
12:20
So the nextsiguiente time you see
a StarEstrella WarsGuerras moviepelícula,
197
728943
2795
La próxima vez que vean
una película de Star Wars,
12:23
and there are people going
from the DagobahDagobah systemsistema to TatooineTatooine,
198
731762
3675
y haya personas yendo del
sistema Dagobah a Tatooine,
12:27
think about what it really meansmedio to have
people spreaduntado out so farlejos.
199
735461
5490
piensen lo que realmente significa
tener personas tan esparcidas.
12:32
What it meansmedio in termscondiciones
of the distancesdistancias betweenEntre them,
200
740975
3062
Qué implica en términos
de distancias entre ellos,
12:36
how they will startcomienzo to feel
separateseparar from eachcada other
201
744061
3820
qué tan separados van a empezar
a sentirse entre ellos
12:39
and just the logisticslogística of the time.
202
747905
3224
y la logística del huso horario.
12:43
We have not sentexpedido people
to MarsMarte yettodavía, but we hopeesperanza to.
203
751937
4552
No hemos enviado personas a Marte
todavía, pero esperamos hacerlo.
12:48
And betweenEntre companiescompañías like SpaceXSpaceX and NASANASA
204
756513
3839
Y entre compañías como SpaceX y la NASA
12:52
and all of the internationalinternacional
spaceespacio agenciesagencias of the worldmundo,
205
760376
3489
y todas las agencias espaciales
internacionales del mundo,
12:55
we hopeesperanza to do that
in the nextsiguiente fewpocos decadesdécadas.
206
763889
3767
esperamos lograrlo
en las próximas décadas.
12:59
So soonpronto we will have people on MarsMarte,
and we trulyverdaderamente will be multi-planetarymulti-planetario.
207
767680
5825
Pronto vamos a tener personas en Marte,
y realmente seremos multiplanetarios.
13:06
And the youngjoven boychico or the youngjoven girlniña
208
774000
2412
Y los jóvenes
13:08
who will be going to MarsMarte could be
in this audienceaudiencia or listeningescuchando todayhoy.
209
776436
7000
que irán Marte pueden estar
en esta audiencia o escuchando ahora.
13:16
I have wanted to work at JPLJPL
on these missionsmisiones sinceya que I was 14 yearsaños oldantiguo
210
784201
5602
Quería trabajar en la NASA,
en estas misiones desde los 14 años
13:21
and I am privilegedprivilegiado to be a partparte of it.
211
789827
2222
y tengo el privilegio
de ser parte de ellas.
13:24
And this is a remarkablenotable time
in the spaceespacio programprograma,
212
792073
4054
Y este es un momento extraordinario
en el programa espacial,
13:28
and we are all in this journeyviaje togetherjuntos.
213
796151
3174
y estamos todos juntos en este viaje.
13:31
So the nextsiguiente time you think
you don't have enoughsuficiente time in your day,
214
799349
5211
Por eso, la próxima vez que piensen
que su día no dura lo suficiente,
13:36
just rememberrecuerda, it's all a matterimportar
of your EarthlyTerrenal perspectiveperspectiva.
215
804584
4778
solo tienen que recordar, todo depende
de la perspectiva terrestre.
13:41
Thank you.
216
809386
1151
Gracias.
13:42
(ApplauseAplausos)
217
810561
4114
(Aplausos)

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Nagin Cox - Spacecraft operations engineer
Nagin Cox explores Mars as part of the team that operates NASA's rovers.

Why you should listen

Nagin Cox has been exploring since she decided as a teenager that she wanted to work at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was born in Bangalore, India, and grew up in Kansas City, Kansas, and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Her experiences as a child in a Muslim household showed her how easily we separate ourselves based on gender, race or nationality, and it inspired her to do something that brings people together instead of dividing them. The Space Program helps the world "look up" and remember that we are one world. Thus, she has known from the time she was 14 years old that she wanted to work on missions of robotic space exploration.  

Cox realized her childhood dream and has been a spacecraft operations engineer at NASA/JPL for over 20 years. She has held leadership and system engineering positions on interplanetary robotic missions including the Galileo mission to Jupiter, the Mars Exploration Rovers, the Kepler exoplanet hunter, InSight and the Mars Curiosity Rover.

In 2015, Cox was honored as the namesake for Asteroid 14061 by its discovers. She has also received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and two NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals. She is a U.S. Department of State STEM Speaker and has spoken to audiences around the world on the stories of the people behind the missions. She has also served on Cornell University’s President's Council for Cornell Women.

Before her time at JPL, Cox served for 6 years in the US Air Force including duty as a Space Operations Officer at NORAD/US Space Command. She holds engineering degrees from Cornell University and the Air Force Institute of Technology as well as a psychology degree from Cornell. (Sometimes she is not sure which one she uses more: the engineering degree or the psychology degree.)

Cox is currently a Tactical Mission Lead on the Curiosity Rover, and every day at NASA/JPL exploring space is as rewarding as the first. You can contact her at nagincox(at)outlook.com.

More profile about the speaker
Nagin Cox | Speaker | TED.com