ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Lucianne Walkowicz - Stellar astronomer
Lucianne Walkowicz works on NASA's Kepler mission, studying starspots and "the tempestuous tantrums of stellar flares."

Why you should listen

Lucianne Walkowicz is an Astronomer at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago. She studies stellar magnetic activity and how stars influence a planet's suitability as a host for alien life. She is also an artist and works in a variety of media, from oil paint to sound. She got her taste for astronomy as an undergrad at Johns Hopkins, testing detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope’s new camera (installed in 2002). She also learned to love the dark stellar denizens of our galaxy, the red dwarfs, which became the topic of her PhD dissertation at University of Washington. Nowadays, she works on NASA’s Kepler mission, studying starspots and the tempestuous tantrums of stellar flares to understand stellar magnetic fields. She is particularly interested in how the high energy radiation from stars influences the habitability of planets around alien suns. Lucianne is also a leader in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, a new project that will scan the sky every night for 10 years to create a huge cosmic movie of our Universe.

More profile about the speaker
Lucianne Walkowicz | Speaker | TED.com
TED2015

Lucianne Walkowicz: Let's not use Mars as a backup planet

لوسیان واڵکۆویکز: با مەریخ وەک جێگرەوە بەکارنەهێنین

Filmed:
2,197,212 views

ئەستێرەناس، گەردوونناس وهاوڵی گەورەی تێد لوسیان واڵکۆویکز کار لەسەر ئامێری کبپلەری ناسا دەکات بۆ گەڕان بە دوای ئەم هەسارانەی گەردوون کە دەتوانن پشتگیری لە ژیان بکەن. لەم ئاخاوتنە بەنرخە داوامان لێ دەکات بە وریاییەوە گرنکی بە مریخ بدەین. لەم ئاخاوتنە کورتە دا، پێشنیاری ئەوە دەکات خەون بەوە نەبینین کە لە کۆتایىدا لە کاتی لە دەست دانی زەوی بەرەو مەریخ بڕۆین. بیڕکردنەوە لە دۆزینەوە و پاراستنی زەوی دوو ڕێچکەی هەمان ئامانجن، هەر وەکو دەڵێت، "تا زیاتر بەدوای هەسارەی وەکو زەوی بگەرێی ،زیاتر سوپاس گوزاری هەسارەی خۆمان دەبین".
- Stellar astronomer
Lucianne Walkowicz works on NASA's Kepler mission, studying starspots and "the tempestuous tantrums of stellar flares." Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

ئێستا چارەنووسازترین
کاتی مێژووی مرۆڤایەتییە.
00:12
We're at a tipping point in human history,
0
926
2490
00:15
a species poised between gaining the stars
and losing the planet we call home.
1
3416
5527
لە نێوان لە دەستدانی زەوی و دۆزینەوەی
هەسارەیەکی جێگرەوە مرۆڤایەتی پەشۆکاوە.
لە ساڵانی ڕابردوو ئێمە زانیاریمان سەبارەت
00:21
Even in just the past few years,
we've greatly expanded
2
9332
2730
00:24
our knowledge of how Earth fits
within the context of our universe.
3
12062
4330
بە چۆن زەوی لە ناو گەردوون
ڕێکەوتووە کۆکردەوە.
ئامێری کیپلەری پشکێنەری ناسا
00:28
NASA's Kepler mission has discovered
4
16392
2738
هەزاران هەسارەی نادیار لە
دەوری ئەستێرەکانی تر دۆزییەوە،
00:31
thousands of potential planets
around other stars,
5
19130
2949
ئاماژە بەوە دەکەن کە زەوی یەکێکە
لەو ملیار هەسارەی نێو گەلەئەسـتێرە.
00:34
indicating that Earth is but one
of billions of planets in our galaxy.
6
22079
4194
کیپلەر تەلیسکۆبێکی بۆشایی ئاسمانە
00:38
Kepler is a space telescope
7
26273
1870
00:40
that measures the subtle dimming of stars
as planets pass in front of them,
8
28143
4291
پێوانەی ڕووناکی ئەوئەستێرانە دەکات
کاتێک هەسارەکان بەپێشیاندا دەڕۆن،
بەربەست دەخەنە بەردەم
ئەو ڕوناکیەی دەگاتە ئێمە.
00:44
blocking just a little bit
of that light from reaching us.
9
32434
2848
داتاکانی کیپلەرقەبارەی هەسارەکان هەروەها
00:47
Kepler's data reveals planets' sizes
10
35732
2600
دووریان لە ئەستێرەکانەوە دەردەخات.
00:50
as well as their distance
from their parent star.
11
38332
2786
بەیەکەوە، یارمەتیمان دەدات لەوە تێبگەبن
ئایا ئەوهەسارانە وەک،
00:53
Together, this helps us understand
whether these planets are small and rocky,
12
41118
4040
هەسارەکانی کۆمەلەی خۆر بچوک و بەردینن،
00:57
like the terrestrial planets
in our own Solar System,
13
45158
2555
00:59
and also how much light they receive
from their parent sun.
14
47713
3366
هەروەها بڕی چەند ڕووناکیان
لە خۆرەوە پێ دەگات.
بەڵگەگەکان ڕاستیەک دەسەلمێنن
ئایا ئەوهەسارەی دۆزیومانەتەوە
01:03
In turn, this provides clues as to whether
these planets that we discover
15
51079
3878
دەکرێت گونجاو بێت بۆ ژیان یاخود نا.
01:06
might be habitable or not.
16
54957
2461
بەداخەوە، لەهەمان کاتدا ئەو
هەسارە بەنرخەی
01:09
Unfortunately, at the same time
as we're discovering this treasure trove
17
57418
4063
01:13
of potentially habitable worlds,
18
61481
2113
کە لەوانەیە بۆ ژیان گونجاو بێت دەدۆزییەوە،
01:15
our own planet is sagging
under the weight of humanity.
19
63594
3460
هەسارەکەمان لەژێر باری قورسایی
مرۆڤایەتی دابەزێت.
ساڵی ٢٠١٤ بە گەرمترین ساڵ تۆمارکراوە.
01:19
2014 was the hottest year on record.
20
67054
4412
بەستەڵەکەکان و دەریا سەهۆڵاویەکان
کە بۆهەزار ساڵە هەن
01:23
Glaciers and sea ice that have
been with us for millennia
21
71466
3343
لەم دە ساڵی داهاتوودا بەرەو نەمان دەچن.
01:26
are now disappearing
in a matter of decades.
22
74809
3135
01:29
These planetary-scale environmental
changes that we have set in motion
23
77944
5111
ئەو گۆڕانە ژینگەیەیی بە شێوەی جووڵاو
دەیخەینە ڕوو بەخێرای
توانامان بەرە وپێش دەبات.
01:35
are rapidly outpacing our ability
to alter their course.
24
83055
3472
من زانایی کەشناسی نیم، بەڵام گەردوونناسم.
01:39
But I'm not a climate scientist,
I'm an astronomer.
25
87347
3715
من لێکۆلینەوەم سەبارەت بە هەسارانەی کە
بۆ ژیان گونجاون و کاریگەریان
01:43
I study planetary habitability
as influenced by stars
26
91062
3370
لەسەر ئەستـێرەکان هەیە کردووە بەئومێدی
دۆزینەوەی شوێنێک لەم گەردوونە
01:46
with the hopes of finding
the places in the universe
27
94432
2458
لەپاڵ هەسارەی خۆمان
کە بۆ ژیان گونجاو بێـت.
01:48
where we might discover
life beyond our own planet.
28
96890
2972
من بە دوای ژینگەیەکی
گونجاو دەگەڕێم.
01:51
You could say that I look for
choice alien real estate.
29
99862
3540
وەک کەسێکی شارەزا لە گەڕان بەدوای ژیان
01:55
Now, as somebody who is deeply embedded
in the search for life in the universe,
30
103902
4342
لەم گەردوونەدا، دەتوانم پێتان ڕابگەیەنم
کە تا زیاتر بەدوای هەسارەی،
02:00
I can tell you that the more
you look for planets like Earth,
31
108244
3367
وەک زەوی بگەرێن، زیاتر سوپا گوزاری
هەسارەی خۆمان دەبێ.
02:03
the more you appreciate
our own planet itself.
32
111611
3646
هەریەک لەم جیهانە نوێییانە
بەراوردێک لە نێوان هەسارە
02:07
Each one of these new worlds
invites a comparison
33
115257
2693
نۆییە دۆزراوەکان و ئەو هەسارانەی
کە ئێمە پێمان باشتربنە بۆ دەکات:
02:09
between the newly discovered planet
and the planets we know best:
34
117950
3622
ئەوانەی لە کۆمەڵە هەسارەکانی خۆرن.
02:13
those of our own Solar System.
35
121572
2090
سەرنجی هەسارەی مەریخ بدەن.
02:15
Consider our neighbor, Mars.
36
123662
1962
هەسارەیەکی بچووک و بەردینە،
و کەمێک لە خۆرەوە دوورە،
02:17
Mars is small and rocky,
and though it's a bit far from the Sun,
37
125624
3785
لەوانەیە بۆمان دەربکەوێ
کە بۆ ژیان گونجاوە
02:21
it might be considered
a potentially habitable world
38
129409
2525
ئەگەر لە لایەن ئامێرێکی
وەکو کیلپەر بدۆزرێتەوە.
02:23
if found by a mission like Kepler.
39
131934
2002
02:25
Indeed, it's possible that Mars
was habitable in the past,
40
133936
3367
لە ڕاستیدا، دەکرێ مەریخ
بۆ ژیان لەبار بووبێت،
هەر ئەمەش هۆکاری
لێکوڵینەوە زۆرەکانمانە دەربارەی مەریخ.
02:29
and in part, this is why
we study Mars so much.
41
137303
3437
ئامیرەکانمان، وەک ئامیرەی کێریوسیتی،
بە هێواشی دەڕویشت،
02:32
Our rovers, like Curiosity,
crawl across its surface,
42
140740
3390
گەڕان بە دوای بەڵگەیەک کە
هەبوونی ژیان بسەلمێنیت.
02:36
scratching for clues as to the origins
of life as we know it.
43
144130
3250
خولگەی فەلەکی وەک ئەرکی ماڤن کە
نمونەی کەش و هەوای مەریخ تۆمار دەکات،
02:39
Orbiters like the MAVEN mission
sample the Martian atmosphere,
44
147380
3506
هەوڵی تێگەیشتن لە هۆکارەکانی چۆنیەتی
لە دەستدانی توانایی ژین لە مەریخ دەدات.
02:42
trying to understand how Mars
might have lost its past habitability.
45
150886
3692
ئێستا کۆمپانیاکانی کەرتی تایبەت نەک تەنها
گەشت بۆ بۆشایی ئاسمان ڕێک دەخەن
02:46
Private spaceflight companies now offer
not just a short trip to near space
46
154578
4565
بەڵکو ئەم هەستە خۆشەی ئەگەری
ژیان لەسەر مەریخیش دەردەبڕن.
02:51
but the tantalizing possibility
of living our lives on Mars.
47
159143
3701
بەڵام لە تێرۆانینێکی قوڵی مەریخەوە بۆمان
02:54
But though these Martian vistas
48
162844
1950
02:56
resemble the deserts
of our own home world,
49
164794
2555
دەردەکەوێت مەریخ لە بیابانەکانی
هەسارەىی خۆمان دەچێت،
02:59
places that are tied in our imagination
to ideas about pioneering and frontiers,
50
167349
5572
ئەوشوێنانەی لەخەیاڵمان دا هەیە
بۆ ئەو بێروکانەی کە پێشەنگتر و،
لە پێشترن، بە بەراورد کردن بە زەوی
03:04
compared to Earth
51
172921
1672
03:06
Mars is a pretty terrible place to live.
52
174593
3297
مەریخ بۆ ژیان شوێنێکی زۆر ترسناکە.
بە لەبەر چاوگرتنی ئەم زەویە
بیابانیە فراوانەی زەوی کە
03:09
Consider the extent to which
we have not colonized
53
177890
3274
لانەی ژیانمان لێ دانەمەزراندووە،
03:13
the deserts of our own planet,
54
181164
1904
بە بەراورد لەگەڵ مەریخ
شوێنێکە کە گژ و گیا چڕی لێیە.
03:15
places that are lush
by comparison with Mars.
55
183068
2833
هەرچەندە لە وشکترین و بەرزترین شوێنی زەوی،
03:17
Even in the driest,
highest places on Earth,
56
185901
2786
هەوایەکی چڕ و پڕ
لە ئۆکسجین هەیە و هەزاران میل
03:20
the air is sweet and thick with oxygen
57
188687
2600
03:23
exhaled from thousands of miles away
by our rainforests.
58
191287
4087
لە دووری دارستانە باراناوییەکانمان
هەڵم و گاز دەردەدات.
من سەبارەت بەو هەواڵە هەست بزوێنانەی
داگیرکردنی مەریخ وهەسارەکانی تر نیگەرانم
03:27
I worry -- I worry that this excitement
about colonizing Mars and other planets
59
195374
5944
03:33
carries with it a long, dark shadow:
60
201318
3111
کە سێبەرێکی گەورە و ڕەشی هەڵگرتبێ:
بیر و بۆچوونی هەندێک کەس
ئەوەیە بوونی مەریخ لەم گەردوونە
03:36
the implication and belief by some
61
204429
2020
03:38
that Mars will be there to save us
from the self-inflicted destruction
62
206449
3553
بۆ پاراستنی ئێمەیە لەم وێراکاریانەی
خۆمان ئەنجامی دەدەین
03:42
of the only truly habitable planet
we know of, the Earth.
63
210002
4133
لەسەر ئەو تاکە شوێنەی کە بۆ ژیان
گونجاوە ئەویش زەوییە.
هەرچەندە من حەز بە کاری
گەڕان بە دوای ئەستێرەکان دەکەم،
03:46
As much as I love
interplanetary exploration,
64
214135
2438
بەڵام لە ناخی دڵمەوە دژی ئەم بیرۆکەیەم.
03:48
I deeply disagree with this idea.
65
216573
2345
چەندین هۆکاری نایاب
بۆچوونە سەر مەریخ هەیە،
03:50
There are many excellent reasons
to go to Mars,
66
218918
2693
بەڵام هەرکەسێک بڵێت مەریخ
جێگرەوەی زەویە:
03:53
but for anyone to tell you that Mars
will be there to back up humanity
67
221611
3414
ئەوا وەک ئەوەیە کاپتنی تایتانیک
بڵێت ئاهەنگی ڕاستەقینە
03:57
is like the captain of the Titanic
telling you that the real party
68
225025
3108
لە سەر چوپی سەرئاوکەوتن دەست پێ دەکات.
04:00
is happening later on the lifeboats.
69
228133
2371
04:02
(Laughter)
70
230504
2949
(پێکەنین)
(چەپڵە ڕێزان)
04:05
(Applause)
71
233453
2902
سوپاس.
04:08
Thank you.
72
236355
2787
بەڵام ئامانجی گەڕان بە دوای
ئەسـتێرە و پاراستنی هەسارەی خۆمان
04:11
But the goals of interplanetary
exploration and planetary preservation
73
239142
3786
دژی یەک نین.
04:14
are not opposed to one another.
74
242928
2181
نەخێر، لە ڕاستیدا دوو ڕێچکەی یەک ئامانجن:
04:17
No, they're in fact two sides
of the same goal:
75
245109
2531
ئەویش تێگەیشتن، پاراستن و
بەرەو پێش بردنی ژیانە لە داهاتوو.
04:19
to understand, preserve
and improve life into the future.
76
247640
4342
ژینگەیی جیهانی ئێمە
ڕەهەندی سەیرو سەمەرەی هەیە.
04:23
The extreme environments
of our own world are alien vistas.
77
251982
4063
ئەوان تەنها لە زەوییەوە نزیکن.
04:28
They're just closer to home.
78
256045
1881
ئەگەرتێگەیشتباین چۆن شوێنیکی
گونجاو بۆ ژیان وەک زەوی
04:29
If we can understand how to create
and maintain habitable spaces
79
257926
4179
لە بارودۆخێکی توند و سەخت دروست بکەین،
04:34
out of hostile, inhospitable
spaces here on Earth,
80
262105
3390
لەوانەیە بتوانین ڕووبەرووی
ناچاری پاراستنی ژینگەکەمان و
04:37
perhaps we can meet the needs
of both preserving our own environment
81
265495
3437
و زیاتریش پێشبکەوین.
04:40
and moving beyond it.
82
268932
2229
لەگەڵ دوا بیرۆکەی زانستی بەجێتان دەهێڵم:
04:43
I leave you with a final
thought experiment:
83
271161
2310
ئەویش بیردۆزی فێرمییە.
04:45
Fermi's paradox.
84
273471
1695
04:47
Many years ago, the physicist Enrico Fermi
asked that, given the fact
85
275166
4862
ساڵانێک لەمەوبەر، زانای فیزیا
ئێنریکۆ فێرمی ئەو ڕاستیەی سەڵماندووە
04:52
that our universe has been around
for a very long time
86
280028
2847
دەڵێت ئەو جیهانەی ئێمە کە
ماوەیەکی زۆرە بوونی هەیە
04:54
and we expect that there
are many planets within it,
87
282875
2670
و پێشبینی دەکەین چەندین
هەسارەی تری هاوشێوە هەبێت،
04:57
we should have found evidence
for alien life by now.
88
285545
3088
دەبوایە تا ئێستادا بەڵگە بۆ ژیانی
بونەوەری ئاسمانی بدۆزیبایەوە.
05:00
So where are they?
89
288633
2043
؟کەواتە ئەوانە لەکوێن
باشە، چارەسەرێکی شیاو بۆ بیردۆزەکەی فێرمی
05:02
Well, one possible solution
to Fermi's paradox
90
290676
3367
ئەوەیە، شارستانییەت
کاتێک لە ڕووی تەکنەلۆجیەوە پێشدەکەوێت
05:06
is that, as civilizations become
technologically advanced enough
91
294043
3483
تا بگاتە ڕادەی خەون بینین بە
ژیان کردن لە ئاسمان،
05:09
to consider living amongst the stars,
92
297526
2322
ناتوانن لە گرنگی مسۆگەر کردنی
05:11
they lose sight of how important it is
93
299848
2484
05:14
to safeguard the home worlds that fostered
that advancement to begin with.
94
302332
4528
ئەم هەسارەیەیی کە ڕێگەی بۆ
پێشکەوتنیان خۆش کردووە تێبگەن.
لەخۆبایی بوونە ئەگەر باوەڕت
وابێت داگیرکردنی هەسارەکان
05:18
It is hubris to believe
that interplanetary colonization alone
95
306860
4388
ئێمە لەخۆمان دەپارێزێ،
05:23
will save us from ourselves,
96
311248
1881
بەڵام دۆزینەوە و پاراستنی هەسارەکان
05:25
but planetary preservation
and interplanetary exploration
97
313129
3529
دەتوانن بەیەکەوە بکرێت.
05:28
can work together.
98
316658
1894
05:30
If we truly believe in our ability
99
318552
2123
ئەگەر بەڕاستی باوەڕمان
بە تواناکانمان هەبێت
05:32
to bend the hostile environments of Mars
for human habitation,
100
320675
3506
بۆ گونجاندنی هەڵومەرجی ژیان
لە ژینگەیی سەختی مەریخ،
کەواتە پێویستە توانای زاڵ بوون
بەسەر ئیشێکی زۆر ئاسانتر هەبیت کە
05:36
then we should be able to surmount
the far easier task of preserving
101
324181
3586
ئەرکی پاراستنی لەباری
ژیانە لەسەر زەوی.
05:39
the habitability of the Earth.
102
327767
2173
سوپاس.
05:41
Thank you.
103
329940
1046
05:42
(Applause)
104
330996
6520
(چەپڵە ڕێزان)
Translated by Daban Qasim
Reviewed by Razaw Bor

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Lucianne Walkowicz - Stellar astronomer
Lucianne Walkowicz works on NASA's Kepler mission, studying starspots and "the tempestuous tantrums of stellar flares."

Why you should listen

Lucianne Walkowicz is an Astronomer at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago. She studies stellar magnetic activity and how stars influence a planet's suitability as a host for alien life. She is also an artist and works in a variety of media, from oil paint to sound. She got her taste for astronomy as an undergrad at Johns Hopkins, testing detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope’s new camera (installed in 2002). She also learned to love the dark stellar denizens of our galaxy, the red dwarfs, which became the topic of her PhD dissertation at University of Washington. Nowadays, she works on NASA’s Kepler mission, studying starspots and the tempestuous tantrums of stellar flares to understand stellar magnetic fields. She is particularly interested in how the high energy radiation from stars influences the habitability of planets around alien suns. Lucianne is also a leader in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, a new project that will scan the sky every night for 10 years to create a huge cosmic movie of our Universe.

More profile about the speaker
Lucianne Walkowicz | Speaker | TED.com