ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Lera Boroditsky - Cognitive scientist
Lera Boroditsky is trying to figure out how humans get so smart.

Why you should listen

Lera Boroditsky is an associate professor of cognitive science at University of California San Diego and editor in chief of Frontiers in Cultural Psychology. She previously served on the faculty at MIT and at Stanford. Her research is on the relationships between mind, world and language (or how humans get so smart).

Boroditsky has been named one of 25 visionaries changing the world by the Utne Reader, and is also a Searle Scholar, a McDonnell scholar, recipient of an NSF Career award and an APA Distinguished Scientist lecturer. She once used the Indonesian exclusive "we" correctly before breakfast and was proud of herself about it all day.

More profile about the speaker
Lera Boroditsky | Speaker | TED.com
TEDWomen 2017

Lera Boroditsky: How language shapes the way we think

Лера Бородитски: Како јазикот влијае на нашето размислување

Filmed:
7,457,173 views

Во светот постојат околу 7.000 живи јазици и сите имаат различни гласови, зборови и структури. Но, дали тие влијаат на начинот на кој размислуваме? Лера Бородитски, когнитивен научник, ни дава примери почнувајќи од јазикот на Абориџините во Австарлија во кој се користат страните на светот наместо зборовите „лево“ и „десно“, сè до многубројните зборови за „сино“ во рускиот јазик, што укажува дека одговорот е јасно и гласно „ДА“. „Убавината на јазичната разноврсност е тоа што таа ни ја открива генијалноста и флексибилноста на човечкиот ум,“ -вели Лера Бородитски. „Човечкиот ум има создадено не еден, туку 7000 когнитивни универзуми.“
- Cognitive scientist
Lera Boroditsky is trying to figure out how humans get so smart. Full bio

Double-click the English transcript below to play the video.

00:12
So, I'll be speaking to you
using language ...
0
940
2575
Ќе ви зборувам со употребата на јазикот
00:16
because I can.
1
4090
1520
зашто можам.
00:17
This is one these magical abilities
that we humans have.
2
5634
3153
Ова е таа магична способност
што ние луѓето ја поседуваме.
00:21
We can transmit really complicated
thoughts to one another.
3
9114
3952
Можеме да си пренесуваме
навистина сложени мисли.
00:25
So what I'm doing right now is,
I'm making sounds with my mouth
4
13479
3595
Во моментов произведувам звуци со устата
00:29
as I'm exhaling.
5
17098
1215
додека вдишувам.
00:30
I'm making tones and hisses and puffs,
6
18337
2348
Правам тонови, издишувам,
00:32
and those are creating
air vibrations in the air.
7
20709
3010
и сето тоа прави вибраци во воздухот.
00:35
Those air vibrations are traveling to you,
8
23743
2446
Тие вибрации патуваат до вас,
00:38
they're hitting your eardrums,
9
26213
1785
удираат на вашите тапанчиња,
00:40
and then your brain takes
those vibrations from your eardrums
10
28022
4580
и тогаш мозокот ги регистрира
00:44
and transforms them into thoughts.
11
32626
2753
и ги претвора во мисли.
00:48
I hope.
12
36031
1151
Се надевам,
00:49
(Laughter)
13
37206
1003
(Смеа)
00:50
I hope that's happening.
14
38233
1157
Се надевам дека е така.
00:51
So because of this ability,
we humans are able to transmit our ideas
15
39414
4576
Поради оваа способност, ние луѓето
сме способни да пренесуваме идеи
00:56
across vast reaches of space and time.
16
44014
2692
далеку низ просторот и времето.
00:58
We're able to transmit
knowledge across minds.
17
46730
4536
Можеме да пренесуваме знаење
од еден на друг ум.
01:03
I can put a bizarre new idea
in your mind right now.
18
51290
3161
Можам да ставам една бизарна
идеја во вашиот ум сега.
01:06
I could say,
19
54475
1155
Можам да кажам,
01:08
"Imagine a jellyfish waltzing in a library
20
56367
3208
„Замислете медуза како
танцува во библиотека
01:11
while thinking about quantum mechanics."
21
59599
2176
додека размислува за квантна механика“.
01:13
(Laughter)
22
61799
1398
(Смеа)
01:15
Now, if everything has gone
relatively well in your life so far,
23
63221
3028
Ако досега сè одело релативно
добро во вашиот живот,
01:18
you probably haven't had
that thought before.
24
66273
2112
сигурно не сте помислиле на тоа.
01:20
(Laughter)
25
68409
1002
(Смеа)
01:21
But now I've just made you think it,
26
69435
1732
Но јас ве натерав да помислите
01:23
through language.
27
71191
1155
на тоа преку јазикот.
01:24
Now of course, there isn't just
one language in the world,
28
72654
2724
Се разбира, нема само еден јазик,
01:27
there are about 7,000 languages
spoken around the world.
29
75402
2645
постојат околу 7.000 јазици во светот.
01:30
And all the languages differ
from one another in all kinds of ways.
30
78071
3160
И сите тие се разликуваат
на различни начини.
01:33
Some languages have different sounds,
31
81255
3091
Некои јазици имаат различни гласови,
01:36
they have different vocabularies,
32
84370
1719
различни зборови,
01:38
and they also have different structures --
33
86113
2039
и различни структури-
01:40
very importantly, different structures.
34
88176
1887
ова е важно - различни структури.
01:42
That begs the question:
35
90896
1192
Се поставува прашањето:
01:44
Does the language we speak
shape the way we think?
36
92112
2612
Дали нашиот јазик
ги обликува нашите мисли?
01:46
Now, this is an ancient question.
37
94748
1572
Прашањето е дамнешно.
01:48
People have been speculating
about this question forever.
38
96344
3171
Луѓето отсекогаш расправале за тоа.
01:51
Charlemagne, Holy Roman emperor, said,
39
99539
2317
Карло Велики, цар на светото
римско царство
01:53
"To have a second language
is to have a second soul" --
40
101880
3036
рекол:„Да се знае втор јазик
е да се има втора душа“-
01:56
strong statement
that language crafts reality.
41
104940
2503
силна изјава дека јазикот
ја обликува реалноста.
01:59
But on the other hand,
Shakespeare has Juliet say,
42
107992
2990
Но, од друга страна,
Јулија на Шекспир вели:
02:03
"What's in a name?
43
111006
1151
„Што е името?“
02:04
A rose by any other name
would smell as sweet."
44
112181
2334
Розата наречена со друго
име исто мириса убаво.“
02:07
Well, that suggests that maybe
language doesn't craft reality.
45
115504
3053
Тоа можеби кажува дека јазикот
не ја обликува реалноста.
02:10
These arguments have gone
back and forth for thousands of years.
46
118926
4006
Луѓето за ова расправале од памтивек.
02:15
But until recently,
there hasn't been any data
47
123400
2731
До неодамна немавме податоци
02:18
to help us decide either way.
48
126155
1556
кои би потврдиле што е точно.
02:20
Recently, in my lab
and other labs around the world,
49
128230
2452
Неодамна во мојата лабораторија и во други,
02:22
we've started doing research,
50
130706
1392
започнавме да истражуваме,
02:24
and now we have actual scientific data
to weigh in on this question.
51
132122
4437
и имаме научни податоци
како одговор на прашањето.
02:28
So let me tell you about
some of my favorite examples.
52
136918
2541
Ќе ви покажам неколку
од моите омилени примери.
02:31
I'll start with an example
from an Aboriginal community in Australia
53
139846
3414
Ќе започнам со примерот
на австралиските Абориџини
02:35
that I had the chance to work with.
54
143284
1728
со кои имав можнсти да работам.
02:37
These are the Kuuk Thaayorre people.
55
145036
1743
Тоа е заедницата на Кук Тајор.
02:38
They live in Pormpuraaw
at the very west edge of Cape York.
56
146803
3794
Тие живеат во Порнпурав,
на крајниот запад на Кејп Јорк.
02:43
What's cool about Kuuk Thaayorre is,
57
151351
2236
Интересно е што кај нив
02:45
in Kuuk Thaayorre, they don't use
words like "left" and "right,"
58
153611
3058
не се употребуваат зборовите
„лево“ и „десно“,
02:48
and instead, everything
is in cardinal directions:
59
156693
2684
туку сè изразуваат со страните на светот:
02:51
north, south, east and west.
60
159401
1424
север, југ, исток и запад.
02:53
And when I say everything,
I really mean everything.
61
161425
2535
Кога велам сè, навистина мислам сè.
02:55
You would say something like,
62
163984
1551
На пример, ќе речат:
02:57
"Oh, there's an ant
on your southwest leg."
63
165559
2512
„Имаш мравка на југо-западната нога.“
03:01
Or, "Move your cup
to the north-northeast a little bit."
64
169178
2656
Или:„Стави ја чашата малку
према север, северо-запад.
03:04
In fact, the way that you say "hello"
in Kuuk Thaayorre is you say,
65
172404
3480
Всушност, „здраво“ на Кук Тајор се вели:
03:07
"Which way are you going?"
66
175908
1266
„По кој пат одиш?
03:09
And the answer should be,
67
177198
1332
А одговорот би бил:
03:11
"North-northeast in the far distance.
68
179014
1772
На север, северо-источно.
03:12
How about you?"
69
180810
1321
А ти?“
03:14
So imagine as you're walking
around your day,
70
182155
3132
Замислете во текот на денот
03:17
every person you greet,
71
185311
1549
на секој што ќе го поздравите
03:18
you have to report your heading direction.
72
186884
2071
да му кажувате во кој правец
се движите?
03:20
(Laughter)
73
188979
1179
(Смеа)
03:22
But that would actually get you
oriented pretty fast, right?
74
190182
3331
Но, така брзо ќе се ориентирате, нели?
03:25
Because you literally
couldn't get past "hello,"
75
193537
2960
Зашто не ќе можете да поздравите некој
03:28
if you didn't know
which way you were going.
76
196521
2075
ако не знаете на која страна одите.
03:31
In fact, people who speak languages
like this stay oriented really well.
77
199969
3492
Луѓето кои зборуваат на овој начин,
добро се ориентираат.
03:35
They stay oriented better
than we used to think humans could.
78
203485
2925
Мноу подобро се ориентираат
отколку што мислевме.
03:38
We used to think that humans
were worse than other creatures
79
206840
2852
Мислевме дека на луѓето
им е потешко од другите суштества
03:41
because of some biological excuse:
80
209716
1716
поради некои биолошки оправдувања:
03:43
"Oh, we don't have magnets
in our beaks or in our scales."
81
211456
3325
„Ние немаме магнети во
клуновите и крлушките.“
03:46
No; if your language and your culture
trains you to do it,
82
214805
2942
Не. Ако вашата култура
ве научи да го правите тоа,
03:49
actually, you can do it.
83
217771
1249
ќе можете да го правите.
03:51
There are humans around the world
who stay oriented really well.
84
219044
3040
Има луѓе кои одлично се ориентираат.
03:54
And just to get us in agreement
85
222108
2128
За да разберете подобро
03:56
about how different this is
from the way we do it,
86
224260
2595
на кој начин е ова различно
од нашиот начин,
03:58
I want you all to close
your eyes for a second
87
226879
2764
затворете ги очите за миг
04:02
and point southeast.
88
230887
1353
и покажете кон југо-исток.
04:04
(Laughter)
89
232264
1710
(Смеа)
04:05
Keep your eyes closed. Point.
90
233998
1578
Мижете и покажете.
04:10
OK, so you can open your eyes.
91
238095
2017
Сега отворете ги очите.
04:12
I see you guys pointing there,
there, there, there, there ...
92
240136
3779
Гледам покажувате таму, таму, таму...
04:16
I don't know which way it is myself --
93
244529
1878
И јас не знам каде е.
04:18
(Laughter)
94
246431
1664
(Смеа)
04:20
You have not been a lot of help.
95
248119
1658
Не помогнавте многу.
04:21
(Laughter)
96
249801
1317
(Смеа)
04:23
So let's just say the accuracy
in this room was not very high.
97
251142
2920
Да речеме точноста не беше на високо ниво.
04:26
This is a big difference in cognitive
ability across languages, right?
98
254086
3360
Ова е голема разлика во когнитивната
способност кај јазиците.
04:29
Where one group -- very
distinguished group like you guys --
99
257470
3395
Една група, посебна група како вас-
04:32
doesn't know which way is which,
100
260889
1563
не знаат кој пат кој е,
04:34
but in another group,
101
262476
1336
но кај друга група,
04:35
I could ask a five-year-old
and they would know.
102
263836
2290
ако прашам 5-годишно дете, ќе знае.
04:38
(Laughter)
103
266150
1084
(Смеа)
04:39
There are also really big differences
in how people think about time.
104
267258
3420
Има значителна разлика во тоа
како луѓето размислуваат за времето.
04:42
So here I have pictures
of my grandfather at different ages.
105
270702
4017
Овде имам слики од дедо ми
на различна возраст.
04:46
And if I ask an English speaker
to organize time,
106
274743
3227
Ако запрашам Англичанец
како го организира времето,
04:49
they might lay it out this way,
107
277994
1485
ќе го направи на овој начин,
04:51
from left to right.
108
279503
1151
од лево на десно.
04:52
This has to do with writing direction.
109
280678
1831
Ова има врска со правецот на пишување.
04:54
If you were a speaker of Hebrew or Arabic,
110
282533
2026
Ако јазикот ви е арапски или хебрејски,
04:56
you might do it going
in the opposite direction,
111
284583
2290
ќе го направите тоа во обратна насока,
04:58
from right to left.
112
286897
1150
од десно на лево.
05:01
But how would the Kuuk Thaayorre,
113
289578
1585
Но, како Кук Тајор,
05:03
this Aboriginal group I just
told you about, do it?
114
291187
2394
заедницата на Абориџини, го прави тоа?
05:05
They don't use words
like "left" and "right."
115
293605
2118
Тие немаат зборовите „лево“ и „десно“.
05:07
Let me give you hint.
116
295747
1492
Да појаснам.
05:09
When we sat people facing south,
117
297263
2551
Кога седеа свртени кон југ,
го организираа
05:11
they organized time from left to right.
118
299838
1858
времето од лево на десно.
05:14
When we sat them facing north,
119
302391
2183
Кога седеа свртени кон север,
05:16
they organized time from right to left.
120
304598
1975
го организираа времето од десно на лево.
05:19
When we sat them facing east,
121
307026
2055
Кога беа свртени кон исток,
05:21
time came towards the body.
122
309105
1740
времето одеше кон телото.
05:23
What's the pattern?
123
311608
1311
Која е шемата?
05:26
East to west, right?
124
314056
1699
Исток кон запад, така?
05:27
So for them, time doesn't actually
get locked on the body at all,
125
315779
3502
За нив, времето не е врзано за телото,
05:31
it gets locked on the landscape.
126
319305
1540
туку за просторот.
05:32
So for me, if I'm facing this way,
127
320869
1718
Значи, ако сум свртена вака,
05:34
then time goes this way,
128
322611
1157
и времето оди натаму,
05:35
and if I'm facing this way,
then time goes this way.
129
323792
2473
ако се свртам вака тогаш
и времето ќе оди натаму.
05:38
I'm facing this way, time goes this way --
130
326289
2000
Се вртам вака, времето оди натаму,
05:40
very egocentric of me to have
the direction of time chase me around
131
328313
3967
себично од мене да ме следи времето
05:44
every time I turn my body.
132
332304
1640
секој пат кога се вртам.
05:46
For the Kuuk Thaayorre,
time is locked on the landscape.
133
334598
2647
За Кук Тајор времето
е врзано за просторот.
Сосема различен начин
на размислување за времето.
05:49
It's a dramatically different way
of thinking about time.
134
337269
2819
Еве уште еден умен, човечки трик.
05:52
Here's another really smart human trick.
135
340112
1911
05:54
Suppose I ask you
how many penguins are there.
136
342047
2213
Избројте ги пингвините на сликата.
05:56
Well, I bet I know how you'd solve
that problem if you solved it.
137
344958
3154
Знам дека ќе ја решите загатката.
06:00
You went, "One, two, three,
four, five, six, seven, eight."
138
348136
2827
Ќе почнете: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8.
Ќе ги изброите.
06:02
You counted them.
139
350987
1164
06:04
You named each one with a number,
140
352175
1609
Ги именувавте со броеви.
06:05
and the last number you said
was the number of penguins.
141
353808
2636
и последниот број е
бројот на пингвините.
06:08
This is a little trick
that you're taught to use as kids.
142
356468
2862
Овој трик го научивте како деца.
06:11
You learn the number list
and you learn how to apply it.
143
359354
3051
Ги учите броевите и учите
како да ги примените.
06:14
A little linguistic trick.
144
362787
1446
Мал, лингвистички трик.
06:16
Well, some languages don't do this,
145
364804
1677
Некои јазици го немаат ова
06:18
because some languages
don't have exact number words.
146
366505
3149
бидејќи немаат прецизни зборови за броеви.
06:22
They're languages that don't have
a word like "seven"
147
370039
2897
Некои јазици немаат збор кој значи 7
06:24
or a word like "eight."
148
372960
1401
или збор кој значи 8.
06:27
In fact, people who speak
these languages don't count,
149
375033
2658
Луѓето кои ги зборуваат
тие јазици не бројат,
06:29
and they have trouble
keeping track of exact quantities.
150
377715
2997
и имаат проблеми со одредување
прецизни количини.
06:32
So, for example, if I ask you
to match this number of penguins
151
380736
3929
Ако ви речам да го споите
број на пингвините
06:36
to the same number of ducks,
152
384689
2264
со истиот број на патки,
06:38
you would be able to do that by counting.
153
386977
2144
ќе го сторите тоа со броење.
06:41
But folks who don't have
that linguistic trait can't do that.
154
389145
3855
Но луѓето кои ги немаат тие јазични
трикови, нема да го направат тоа.
06:47
Languages also differ in how
they divide up the color spectrum --
155
395653
3154
Јазиците се разликуваат и по
поделбата на спектарот на бои-
06:50
the visual world.
156
398831
1150
визуелниот свет.
06:52
Some languages have
lots of words for colors,
157
400348
2152
Некои јазици имаат многу зборови за бои,
06:54
some have only a couple words,
"light" and "dark."
158
402524
2364
некои ги имаат само „светло“ и „темно“.
06:56
And languages differ in where they put
boundaries between colors.
159
404912
3623
Јазиците се разликуваат по тоа
каде ја стваат границата меѓу боите.
07:00
So, for example, in English,
there's a world for blue
160
408559
3215
Во англискиот јазик има збор за „сино“
07:03
that covers all of the colors
that you can see on the screen,
161
411798
3135
кој ги покрива сите бои
кои ги гледата на екранот,
07:06
but in Russian, there isn't a single word.
162
414957
2006
но во рускиот јазик тоа не е еден збор.
07:08
Instead, Russian speakers
have to differentiate
163
416987
2206
Рускиот јазик разликува
07:11
between light blue, "goluboy,"
164
419217
1471
светло сино ( голубои)
07:12
and dark blue, "siniy."
165
420712
1576
и темно сино ( синий).
07:15
So Russians have this lifetime
of experience of, in language,
166
423138
3983
Русите го имаат овој вид на искуство,
во јазикот,
07:19
distinguishing these two colors.
167
427145
1869
да ги разликуваат овие две бои.
07:21
When we test people's ability
to perceptually discriminate these colors,
168
429038
3963
Кога ги тестираме луѓето
да ги разликуваат овие бои
07:25
what we find is that
Russian speakers are faster
169
433025
2521
дознаваме дека Русите се побрзи
07:27
across this linguistic boundary.
170
435570
1558
низ овие лингвистички граници.
07:29
They're faster to be able
to tell the difference
171
437152
2282
Можат побрзо да прават разлика
07:31
between a light and dark blue.
172
439458
1458
меѓу темносина и светлосина.
07:33
And when you look at people's brains
as they're looking at colors --
173
441299
3264
Кога набљудувате човечки мозоци
кои посматраат бои -
07:36
say you have colors shifting slowly
from light to dark blue --
174
444587
3335
бои кои се прелеваат
од посветли кон потемни -
07:40
the brains of people who use
different words for light and dark blue
175
448798
4452
мозоците на луѓето кои користат различни
зборови за светла и темна нијанса
07:45
will give a surprised reaction
as the colors shift from light to dark,
176
453274
3510
се изненадуваат при
промена на бојата од светла кон темна,
07:48
as if, "Ooh, something
has categorically changed,"
177
456808
3182
како: „Леле, нешто се видоизмени,“
07:52
whereas the brains
of English speakers, for example,
178
460014
2446
додека мозокот на Англичанец, на пример,
07:54
that don't make
this categorical distinction,
179
462484
2140
кој не прави ваква категоризација,
07:56
don't give that surprise,
180
464648
1196
не се изненадува,
07:57
because nothing is categorically changing.
181
465868
2083
бидејќи ништо не се менува категориски.
08:02
Languages have all kinds
of structural quirks.
182
470054
2504
Јазикот има многу видови
на структурални чуда.
08:04
This is one of my favorites.
183
472582
1337
Едно од моите омилени е ова.
08:05
Lots of languages have grammatical gender;
184
473943
2432
Многу јазици имаат граматички родови;
08:08
every noun gets assigned a gender,
often masculine or feminine.
185
476399
4630
секоја именка се именува како
машки или женски род.
08:13
And these genders differ across languages.
186
481053
2057
Овие родови се разликуваат во јазиците.
08:15
So, for example, the sun is feminine
in German but masculine in Spanish,
187
483134
4541
На пример, сонцето е женски род во
германски, но во шпанскиот е машки род,
08:19
and the moon, the reverse.
188
487699
1348
со „месечина“ е обратно.
08:21
Could this actually have any
consequence for how people think?
189
489634
3462
Дали ова влијае како размислуваат луѓето?
08:25
Do German speakers think of the sun
as somehow more female-like,
190
493120
3994
Дали Германците сметаат дека
сонцето изгледа поженствено?
08:29
and the moon somehow more male-like?
191
497138
1906
а месечината помажествено?
08:31
Actually, it turns out that's the case.
192
499767
1906
Испадна дека е така.
08:33
So if you ask German and Spanish speakers
to, say, describe a bridge,
193
501697
5423
Ако замолите Германец или
Шпанец да опише мост,
08:39
like the one here --
194
507144
1436
како овој овде -
08:40
"bridge" happens to be grammatically
feminine in German,
195
508604
3349
„мост“ е женски род во германски,
08:43
grammatically masculine in Spanish --
196
511977
2156
а во шпански е машки род.
08:46
German speakers are more likely
to say bridges are "beautiful," "elegant"
197
514157
4318
Германец веројатно ќе рече
дека мостот е убав, елегантен,
08:50
and stereotypically feminine words.
198
518499
2127
значи стереотипни зборови за жена.
08:52
Whereas Spanish speakers
will be more likely to say
199
520650
2509
За разлика, Шпанец би рекол
08:55
they're "strong" or "long,"
200
523183
1546
дека мостот е долг или силен,
08:56
these masculine words.
201
524753
1386
- зборови типични за мажи.
09:00
(Laughter)
202
528849
1680
(Смеа)
09:03
Languages also differ in how
they describe events, right?
203
531396
4122
Јазиците се разликуваат и по тоа
како опишуваат настани.
09:08
You take an event like this, an accident.
204
536060
2346
Земете за пример несреќен случај.
09:10
In English, it's fine to say,
"He broke the vase."
205
538430
2788
На англиски во ред е да
се каже „Тој ја скрши вазната.“
09:13
In a language like Spanish,
206
541869
2544
На шпански, на пример,
09:16
you might be more likely
to say, "The vase broke,"
207
544437
2847
обично се вели: „Се скрши вазната“
09:19
or, "The vase broke itself."
208
547308
1561
или „Вазната се скрши“.
09:21
If it's an accident, you wouldn't say
that someone did it.
209
549332
3222
Ако е несреќен случај,
тие не велат дека некој ја скршил.
09:24
In English, quite weirdly,
we can even say things like,
210
552578
3406
На англиски, што е чудно, велиме:
09:28
"I broke my arm."
211
556008
1247
„Си ја скршив раката“.
09:29
Now, in lots of languages,
212
557953
1834
Во многу други јазици
09:31
you couldn't use that construction
unless you are a lunatic
213
559811
3171
не би употребиле таква формулација
освен ако не сте лудак
09:35
and you went out
looking to break your arm --
214
563006
2129
кој пробува да си ја скрши раката
09:37
(Laughter)
215
565159
1002
(Смеа)
09:38
and you succeeded.
216
566185
1151
и притоа успее во тоа.
09:39
If it was an accident,
you would use a different construction.
217
567360
3264
Ако е несреќен случај, употребувате
друга формулација.
09:42
Now, this has consequences.
218
570648
1805
Ова има последици.
09:44
So, people who speak different languages
will pay attention to different things,
219
572477
4188
Луѓето кои зборуваат различни
јазици се фокусираат на различни работи,
09:48
depending on what their language
usually requires them to do.
220
576689
3406
во зависност од тоа што
бара јазикот од нив.
09:52
So we show the same accident
to English speakers and Spanish speakers,
221
580119
4172
Истата незгода ја прикажавме
на Англичани и Шпанци,
09:56
English speakers will remember who did it,
222
584315
3285
Англичаните паметат
кој го извршил дејството,
зашто јазикот бара да се рече:
„Тој го стори тоа, тој ја скрши вазната“.
10:00
because English requires you
to say, "He did it; he broke the vase."
223
588525
3414
Додека, пак, Шпанците помалку се склони
да запамтат кој го сторил тоа
10:03
Whereas Spanish speakers might be
less likely to remember who did it
224
591963
3203
10:07
if it's an accident,
225
595190
1151
ако е несреќен случај,
10:08
but they're more likely to remember
that it was an accident.
226
596365
2829
но повеќе паметат дека е случајна незгода.
10:11
They're more likely
to remember the intention.
227
599218
2436
Повеќе ја паметат намерата.
10:13
So, two people watch the same event,
228
601678
3083
Двајца гледаат ист настан,
10:16
witness the same crime,
229
604785
2081
очевидци се на ист прекршок,
10:18
but end up remembering
different things about that event.
230
606890
3046
но на крајот паметат различни
нешта за настанот.
10:22
This has implications, of course,
for eyewitness testimony.
231
610564
3259
Ова влијае врз сведочењата на очевидци.
10:26
It also has implications
for blame and punishment.
232
614590
2362
Исто така влијае врз обвиненија и казни.
10:28
So if you take English speakers
233
616976
1807
Ако имате луѓе кои зборуваат англиски
10:30
and I just show you
someone breaking a vase,
234
618807
2164
и ви покажам некој кој крши вазна,
10:32
and I say, "He broke the vase,"
as opposed to "The vase broke,"
235
620995
3855
и речам „Тој ја скрши“,
наместо „Се скрши вазната“,
10:37
even though you can witness it yourself,
236
625504
1913
дури и да сте виделе,
10:39
you can watch the video,
237
627441
1268
да ја видите снимката,
10:40
you can watch the crime against the vase,
238
628733
2162
да го видите прекршокот со вазната,
10:44
you will punish someone more,
239
632157
1767
ќе казните некого повеќе,
10:45
you will blame someone more
if I just said, "He broke it,"
240
633948
2853
ќе обвините некого повеќе,
ако речам: „Тој ја скрши“,
10:48
as opposed to, "It broke."
241
636825
1493
наместо, „Се скрши“.
10:50
The language guides
our reasoning about events.
242
638931
3323
Јазикот го формира нашето
мислење за настаните.
10:55
Now, I've given you a few examples
243
643996
2886
Ви дадов неколку примери,
10:58
of how language can profoundly
shape the way we think,
244
646906
3727
како јазикот во голема мера
влијае врз нашето размислување
11:02
and it does so in a variety of ways.
245
650657
2175
и го прави тоа на повеќе начини.
11:04
So language can have big effects,
246
652856
1931
Јазикот има огромно влијание.
11:06
like we saw with space and time,
247
654811
1742
Видовме како времето и просторот
11:08
where people can lay out space and time
248
656577
1906
луѓето ги подредуваат
11:10
in completely different
coordinate frames from each other.
249
658507
3241
на сосема различни начини едно од друго.
11:14
Language can also have
really deep effects --
250
662781
2234
Јазкот има длабоко влијание-
11:17
that's what we saw
with the case of number.
251
665039
2184
видовме кај броевите.
11:19
Having count words in your language,
252
667572
2043
Да се брои на јазикот,
11:21
having number words,
253
669639
1220
да се има броеви
11:22
opens up the whole world of mathematics.
254
670883
2561
значи да се има основа за математика.
11:25
Of course, if you don't count,
you can't do algebra,
255
673468
2503
Ако не броите, не можете да имате алгебра.
11:27
you can't do any of the things
256
675995
1564
Не ќе можете да ги
направите работите
11:29
that would be required
to build a room like this
257
677583
2743
што би биле потребни за
изградба на оваа просторија
11:32
or make this broadcast, right?
258
680350
2004
или за емитување на оваа програма, нели?
11:34
This little trick of number words
gives you a stepping stone
259
682836
2863
Зборовите за броевите
се отскочна даска
11:37
into a whole cognitive realm.
260
685723
1481
за нурнување во еден
нов когнитивен свет.
11:40
Language can also have
really early effects,
261
688420
2295
Јазикот може да има првично влијание
11:42
what we saw in the case of color.
262
690739
2870
како што видовме со боите.
11:46
These are really simple,
basic, perceptual decisions.
263
694205
2494
Овие се едноставни,основни,
перцептивни одлуки.
11:48
We make thousands of them all the time,
264
696723
2360
Цело време донесуваме илјадници одлуки
11:51
and yet, language is getting in there
265
699107
1817
и сепак јазикот се вплеткува
11:52
and fussing even with these tiny little
perceptual decisions that we make.
266
700948
4331
и се меша со овие мали перцептивни
одлуки кои ги донесуваме.
11:58
Language can have really broad effects.
267
706787
1859
Јазикот има сеопфатно влијание.
12:00
So the case of grammatical gender
may be a little silly,
268
708670
3228
Примерот со родовите може да звучи лудо,
12:03
but at the same time,
grammatical gender applies to all nouns.
269
711922
3833
но граматичкиот род
се однесува на сите именки.
12:08
That means language can shape
how you're thinking
270
716061
2289
Тоа значи дека јазикот влијае
како размислуваме
12:10
about anything that can be
named by a noun.
271
718374
2887
за сè што се именува како именка.
12:14
That's a lot of stuff.
272
722185
1329
Има многу нешта.
12:16
And finally, I gave you an example
of how language can shape things
273
724449
3257
На крај ви дадов пример
како јазикот ги обликува нештата
12:19
that have personal weight to us --
274
727730
1636
кои имаат лично значење за нас-
12:21
ideas like blame and punishment
or eyewitness memory.
275
729390
2576
идеи како обвинување, казна и сведоштво.
12:23
These are important things
in our daily lives.
276
731990
2164
Овие се значајни нешта во нашиот живот.
12:28
Now, the beauty of linguistic diversity
is that it reveals to us
277
736153
5001
Убавината на лингвистичката
разноврсност е тоа што таа ни открива
12:33
just how ingenious and how flexible
the human mind is.
278
741178
3947
колку е генијален
и флексибилен човечкиот ум.
12:37
Human minds have invented
not one cognitive universe, but 7,000 --
279
745775
4531
Човечкиот ум открил не еден туку
7.000 когнитивни универзуми-
12:42
there are 7,000 languages
spoken around the world.
280
750330
2358
има 7000 јазици кои
се зборуваат во светот.
12:46
And we can create many more --
281
754010
1677
И може да создадеме многу повеќе-
12:47
languages, of course, are living things,
282
755711
3083
јазиците, се разбира, се живи,
12:50
things that we can hone
and change to suit our needs.
283
758818
3766
можеме да ги усовршуваме
и менуваме за сопствени потреби.
12:55
The tragic thing is that we're losing
so much of this linguistic diversity
284
763786
3483
Трагично е што губиме голем дел
од оваа лингвистичка разноврсност
12:59
all the time.
285
767293
1151
со тек на време.
13:00
We're losing about one language a week,
286
768468
1892
Губиме околу еден јазик неделно,
13:02
and by some estimates,
287
770384
1466
а според некои проценки,
13:03
half of the world's languages
will be gone in the next hundred years.
288
771874
3267
половина од јазиците во светот
ќе исчезнат во наредните 100 години.
13:07
And the even worse news is that right now,
289
775966
2822
Уште полоша вест е дека токму сега
13:10
almost everything we know about
the human mind and human brain
290
778812
3708
сè што знаеме за човечкиот
ум и мозокот, претежно
13:14
is based on studies of usually American
English-speaking undergraduates
291
782544
5028
се заснова на истражувања на американски
студенти кои зборуваат англиски
13:19
at universities.
292
787596
1324
на универзитетите.
Тоа ги исклучува речиси сите луѓе, нели?
13:22
That excludes almost all humans. Right?
293
790742
3533
Она што знаеме за човечкиот ум
е прилично ограничено и пристрасно,
13:26
So what we know about the human mind
is actually incredibly narrow and biased,
294
794299
4971
и нашата наука мора да направи повеќе.
13:31
and our science has to do better.
295
799294
3236
13:37
I want to leave you
with this final thought.
296
805987
2259
Сакам да ве оставам
со оваа последна мисла.
Ви кажав како говорниците на
различни јазици размислуваат различно,
13:40
I've told you about how speakers
of different languages think differently,
297
808270
3513
но, не се работи за тоа како
другите размислуваат.
13:43
but of course, that's not about
how people elsewhere think.
298
811807
3284
13:47
It's about how you think.
299
815115
1419
Туку како вие размислувате.
Како јазикот кој го зборувате
го обликува вашето размислување.
13:48
It's how the language that you speak
shapes the way that you think.
300
816558
3606
13:53
And that gives you the opportunity to ask,
301
821070
2576
Тоа ви дава можност да се запрашате
„Зошто размислувам токму вака?“
13:55
"Why do I think the way that I do?"
302
823670
2071
13:57
"How could I think differently?"
303
825765
1596
„Како можам поинаку да размислувам?“
Исто така,
13:59
And also,
304
827908
1365
„Какви мисли сакам да создадам?„
14:01
"What thoughts do I wish to create?"
305
829297
1727
14:03
Thank you very much.
306
831842
1159
Ви благодарам!
14:05
(Applause)
307
833025
2756

▲Back to top

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Lera Boroditsky - Cognitive scientist
Lera Boroditsky is trying to figure out how humans get so smart.

Why you should listen

Lera Boroditsky is an associate professor of cognitive science at University of California San Diego and editor in chief of Frontiers in Cultural Psychology. She previously served on the faculty at MIT and at Stanford. Her research is on the relationships between mind, world and language (or how humans get so smart).

Boroditsky has been named one of 25 visionaries changing the world by the Utne Reader, and is also a Searle Scholar, a McDonnell scholar, recipient of an NSF Career award and an APA Distinguished Scientist lecturer. She once used the Indonesian exclusive "we" correctly before breakfast and was proud of herself about it all day.

More profile about the speaker
Lera Boroditsky | Speaker | TED.com