Robin Steinberg: What if we ended the injustice of bail?

TED2018

Robin Steinberg: What if we ended the injustice of bail?

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On any given night, more than 450,000 people in the United States are locked up in jail simply because they don't have enough money to pay bail. The sums in question are often around $500: easy for some to pay, impossible for others. This has real human consequences -- people lose jobs, homes and lives, and it drives racial disparities in the legal system. Robin Steinberg has a bold idea to change this. In this powerful talk, she outlines the plan for The Bail Project -- an unprecedented national revolving bail fund to fight mass incarceration. Her ambitious plan is one of the first ideas of the Audacious Project, TED's new initiative to inspire global change.

Jaron Lanier: How we need to remake the internet

TED2018

Jaron Lanier: How we need to remake the internet

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In the early days of digital culture, Jaron Lanier helped craft a vision for the internet as public commons where humanity could share its knowledge -- but even then, this vision was haunted by the dark side of how it could turn out: with personal devices that control our lives, monitor our data and feed us stimuli. (Sound familiar?) In this visionary talk, Lanier reflects on a "globally tragic, astoundingly ridiculous mistake" companies like Google and Facebook made at the foundation of digital culture -- and how we can undo it. "We cannot have a society in which, if two people wish to communicate, the only way that can happen is if it's financed by a third person who wishes to manipulate them," he says.

Yasin Kakande: What's missing in the global debate over refugees

TED2018

Yasin Kakande: What's missing in the global debate over refugees

529,123 views


In the ongoing debate over refugees, we hear from everyone -- from politicians who pledge border controls to citizens who fear they'll lose their jobs -- everyone, that is, except migrants themselves. Why are they coming? Journalist and TED Fellow Yasin Kakande explains what compelled him and many others to flee their homelands, urging a more open discussion and a new perspective. Because humanity's story, he reminds us, is a story of migration: "There are no restrictions that could ever be so rigorous to stop the wave of migration that has determined our human history," he says.

John Amory: How a male contraceptive pill could work

TEDMED 2017

John Amory: How a male contraceptive pill could work

404,051 views


Andrologist John Amory is developing innovative male contraception that gives men a new option for taking responsibility to prevent unintended pregnancy. He details the science in development -- and why the world needs a male pill.

Clemantine Wamariya: War and what comes after

TEDWomen 2017

Clemantine Wamariya: War and what comes after

449,855 views


Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when the Rwandan Civil War forced her and her sister to flee their home in Kigali, leaving their parents and everything they knew behind. In this deeply personal talk, she tells the story of how she became a refugee, living in camps in seven countries over the next six years -- and how she's tried to make sense of what came after.

Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe: "RainMakers"

TEDGlobal 2017

Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe: "RainMakers"

77,671 views

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Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe summon a downpour with a poetic, powerful dance performance. Set to a composition of singing, drums and strings, the dancers radiate energy -- moving in circles, in shapes and in unison as they consume the TED stage.

Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo: What it takes to be racially literate

TEDWomen 2017

Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo: What it takes to be racially literate

320,971 views

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Over the last year, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo traveled to all 50 US states, collecting personal stories about race and intersectionality. Now they're on a mission to equip every American with the tools to understand, navigate and improve a world structured by racial division. In a dynamic talk, Vulchi and Guo pair the personal stories they've collected with research and statistics to reveal two fundamental gaps in our racial literacy -- and how we can overcome them.

José Andrés: How a team of chefs fed Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

TEDxMidAtlantic

José Andrés: How a team of chefs fed Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

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After Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2017, chef José Andrés traveled to the devastated island with a simple idea: to feed the hungry. Millions of meals served later, Andrés shares the remarkable story of creating the world's biggest restaurant -- and the awesome power of letting people in need know that somebody cares about them.

Kasiva Mutua: How I use the drum to tell my story

TEDGlobal 2017

Kasiva Mutua: How I use the drum to tell my story

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In this talk-performance hybrid, drummer, percussionist and TED Fellow Kasiva Mutua shares how she's breaking the taboo against female drummers in Kenya -- and her mission to teach the significance and importance of the drum to young boys, women and girls. "Women can be custodians of culture, too," Mutua says.

Sarah Murray: A playful solution to the housing crisis

TED@Westpac

Sarah Murray: A playful solution to the housing crisis

97,642 views

No Video

Frustrated by her lack of self-determination in the housing market, Sarah Murray created a computer game that allows home buyers to design a house and have it delivered to them in modular components that can be assembled on-site. Learn how her effort is putting would-be homeowners in control of the largest purchase of their lives -- as well as cutting costs, protecting the environment and helping provide homes for those in need.

Eric Berridge: Why tech needs the humanities

TED@IBM

Eric Berridge: Why tech needs the humanities

413,139 views


If you want to build a team of innovative problem-solvers, you should value the humanities just as much as the sciences, says entrepreneur Eric Berridge. He shares why tech companies should look beyond STEM graduates for new hires -- and how people with backgrounds in the arts and humanities can bring creativity and insight to technical workplaces.

Mark Tyndall: The harm reduction model of drug addiction treatment

TEDMED 2017

Mark Tyndall: The harm reduction model of drug addiction treatment

555,550 views


Why do we still think that drug use is a law-enforcement issue? Making drugs illegal does nothing to stop people from using them, says public health expert Mark Tyndall. So, what might work? Tyndall shares community-based research that shows how harm-reduction strategies, like safe-injection sites, are working to address the drug overdose crisis.

Sarah Donnelly: How work kept me going during my cancer treatment

TED@Westpac

Sarah Donnelly: How work kept me going during my cancer treatment

420,434 views


When lawyer Sarah Donnelly was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to her friends and family for support -- but she also found meaning, focus and stability in her work. In a personal talk about why and how she stayed on the job, she shares her insights on how workplaces can accommodate people going through major illnesses -- because the benefits go both ways.

Tania Douglas: To design better tech, understand context

TEDGlobal 2017

Tania Douglas: To design better tech, understand context

353,856 views

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What good is a sophisticated piece of medical equipment to people in Africa if it can't handle the climate there? Biomedical engineer Tania Douglas shares stories of how we're often blinded to real needs in our pursuit of technology -- and how a deeper understanding of the context where it's used can lead us to better solutions.

Mennat El Ghalid: How fungi recognize (and infect) plants

TEDGlobal 2017

Mennat El Ghalid: How fungi recognize (and infect) plants

391,165 views


Each year, the world loses enough food to feed half a billion people to fungi, the most destructive pathogens of plants. Mycologist and TED Fellow Mennat El Ghalid explains how a breakthrough in our understanding of the molecular signals fungi use to attack plants could disrupt this interaction -- and save our crops.

Dayo Ogunyemi: Visions of Africa's future, from African filmmakers

TEDGlobal 2017

Dayo Ogunyemi: Visions of Africa's future, from African filmmakers

438,506 views


By expanding boundaries, exploring possibilities and conveying truth, films have helped change Africa's reality (even before "Black Panther"). Dayo Ogunyemi invites us to imagine Africa's future through the lens of inspiring filmmakers from across the continent, showing us how they can inspire Africa to make a hundred-year leap.

Nancy Rabalais: The "dead zone" of the Gulf of Mexico

TEDWomen 2017

Nancy Rabalais: The "dead zone" of the Gulf of Mexico

571,859 views


Ocean expert Nancy Rabalais tracks the ominously named "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico -- where there isn't enough oxygen in the water to support life. The Gulf has the second largest dead zone in the world; on top of killing fish and crustaceans, it's also killing fisheries in these waters. Rabalais tells us about what's causing it -- and how we can reverse its harmful effects and restore one of America's natural treasures.

Malika Whitley: How the arts help homeless youth heal and build

TED Residency

Malika Whitley: How the arts help homeless youth heal and build

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Malika Whitley is the founder of ChopArt, an organization for homeless teens focused on mentorship, dignity and opportunity through the arts. In this moving, personal talk, she shares her story of homelessness and finding her voice through arts -- and her mission to provide a creative outlet for others who have been pushed to the margins of society.

Andrew Dent: To eliminate waste, we need to rediscover thrift

TEDNYC

Andrew Dent: To eliminate waste, we need to rediscover thrift

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There's no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent -- when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift -- the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don't have to purchase anything new -- as well as advances in material science, like electronics made of nanocellulose and enzymes that can help make plastic infinitely recyclable.

Erica Stone: Academic research is publicly funded -- why isn't it publicly available?

TEDxMileHighWomen

Erica Stone: Academic research is publicly funded -- why isn't it publicly available?

354,449 views


In the US, your taxes fund academic research at public universities. Why then do you need to pay expensive, for-profit journals for the results of that research? Erica Stone advocates for a new, open-access relationship between the public and scholars, making the case that academics should publish in more accessible media. "A functioning democracy requires that the public be well-educated and well-informed," Stone says. "Instead of research happening behind paywalls and bureaucracy, wouldn't it be better if it was unfolding right in front of us?"

Sauti Sol: The rhythm of Afrobeat

TEDGlobal 2017

Sauti Sol: The rhythm of Afrobeat

91,710 views


From Beyoncé to Drake and beyond, the world is rocking to the rhythm of Afrobeat. Feel the music as Kenyan afro-pop superstars Sauti Sol take the TED stage to perform three songs: "Live and Die in Afrika," "Sura Yako" and "Kuliko Jana."

Tara Houska: The Standing Rock resistance and our fight for indigenous rights

TEDWomen 2017

Tara Houska: The Standing Rock resistance and our fight for indigenous rights

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Still invisible and often an afterthought, indigenous peoples are uniting to protect the world's water, lands and history -- while trying to heal from genocide and ongoing inequality. Tribal attorney and Couchiching First Nation citizen Tara Houska chronicles the history of attempts by government and industry to eradicate the legitimacy of indigenous peoples' land and culture, including the months-long standoff at Standing Rock which rallied thousands around the world. "It's incredible what you can do when you stand together," Houska says. "Stand with us -- empathize, learn, grow, change the conversation."

Danny Hillis: Should we create a solar shade to cool the earth?

TED2017

Danny Hillis: Should we create a solar shade to cool the earth?

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In this perspective-shifting talk, Danny Hillis prompts us to approach global issues like climate change with creative scientific solutions. Taking a stand for solar geoengineering, he looks at controversial solutions with open-minded curiosity.

Lera Boroditsky: How language shapes the way we think

TEDWomen 2017

Lera Boroditsky: How language shapes the way we think

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There are about 7,000 languages spoken around the world -- and they all have different sounds, vocabularies and structures. But do they shape the way we think? Cognitive scientist Lera Boroditsky shares examples of language -- from an Aboriginal community in Australia that uses cardinal directions instead of left and right to the multiple words for blue in Russian -- that suggest the answer is a resounding yes. "The beauty of linguistic diversity is that it reveals to us just how ingenious and how flexible the human mind is," Boroditsky says. "Human minds have invented not one cognitive universe, but 7,000."

Drew Philp: My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it

TEDNYC

Drew Philp: My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it

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In 2009, journalist and screenwriter Drew Philp bought a ruined house in Detroit for $500. In the years that followed, as he gutted the interior and removed the heaps of garbage crowding the rooms, he didn't just learn how to repair a house -- he learned how to build a community. In a tribute to the city he loves, Philp tells us about "radical neighborliness" and makes the case that we have "the power to create the world anew together and to do it ourselves when our governments refuse."

Vikram Sharma: How quantum physics can make encryption stronger

TED@Westpac

Vikram Sharma: How quantum physics can make encryption stronger

402,854 views


As quantum computing matures, it's going to bring unimaginable increases in computational power along with it -- and the systems we use to protect our data (and our democratic processes) will become even more vulnerable. But there's still time to plan against the impending data apocalypse, says encryption expert Vikram Sharma. Learn more about how he's fighting quantum with quantum: designing security devices and programs that use the power of quantum physics to defend against the most sophisticated attacks.

Raphael Arar: How we can teach computers to make sense of our emotions

TED@IBM

Raphael Arar: How we can teach computers to make sense of our emotions

208,632 views


How can we make AI that people actually want to interact with? Raphael Arar suggests we start by making art. He shares interactive projects that help AI explore complex ideas like nostalgia, intuition and conversation -- all working towards the goal of making our future technology just as much human as it is artificial.

Rei: "my mama" / "BLACK BANANA"

TEDNYC

Rei: "my mama" / "BLACK BANANA"

135,300 views


Singer-songwriter Rei brings her mix of indie rock and blues to the TED stage in a performance of two songs, "my mama" and "BLACK BANANA."

Judith Heumann: Our fight for disability rights -- and why we're not done yet

TEDxMidAtlantic

Judith Heumann: Our fight for disability rights -- and why we're not done yet

366,951 views


Four decades ago, Judith Heumann helped to lead a groundbreaking protest called the Section 504 sit-in -- in which disabled-rights activists occupied a federal building for almost a month, demanding greater accessibility for all. In this personal, inspiring talk, Heumann tells the stories behind the protest -- and reminds us that, 40 years on, there's still work left to do.

Leo Igwe: Why I choose humanism over faith

TEDGlobal 2017

Leo Igwe: Why I choose humanism over faith

369,708 views


As a humanist, Leo Igwe doesn't believe in divine intervention -- but he does believe in the power of human beings to alleviate suffering, cure disease, preserve the planet and turn situations of poverty into prosperity. In this bold talk, Igwe shares how humanism can free Africans from damaging superstitions and give them the power to rebuild the continent.