Kirsty Duncan: Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge

TED2018

Kirsty Duncan: Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge

890,041 views

Readability: 4.6


"You do not mess with something so fundamental, so precious, as science," says Kirsty Duncan, Canada's first Minister of Science. In a heartfelt, inspiring talk about pushing boundaries, she makes the case that researchers must be free to present uncomfortable truths and challenge the thinking of the day -- and that we all have a duty to speak up when we see science being stifled or suppressed.

Steven Pinker: Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers

TED2018

Steven Pinker: Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers

1,728,244 views

Readability: 5


Was 2017 really the "worst year ever," as some would have us believe? In his analysis of recent data on homicide, war, poverty, pollution and more, psychologist Steven Pinker finds that we're doing better now in every one of them when compared with 30 years ago. But progress isn't inevitable, and it doesn't mean everything gets better for everyone all the time, Pinker says. Instead, progress is problem-solving, and we should look at things like climate change and nuclear war as problems to be solved, not apocalypses in waiting. "We will never have a perfect world, and it would be dangerous to seek one," he says. "But there's no limit to the betterments we can attain if we continue to apply knowledge to enhance human flourishing."

Dylan Marron: How I turn negative online comments into positive offline conversations

TED2018

Dylan Marron: How I turn negative online comments into positive offline conversations

1,226,249 views

Readability: 3.9


Digital creator Dylan Marron has racked up millions of views for projects like "Every Single Word" and "Sitting in Bathrooms With Trans People" -- but he's found that the flip side of success online is internet hate. Over time, he's developed an unexpected coping mechanism: calling the people who leave him insensitive comments and asking a simple question: "Why did you write that?" In a thoughtful talk about how we interact online, Marron explains how sometimes the most subversive thing you can do is actually speak with people you disagree with, not simply at them.

Laura L. Dunn: It's time for the law to protect victims of gender violence

TED2018

Laura L. Dunn: It's time for the law to protect victims of gender violence

838,728 views

Readability: 6.6


To make accountability the norm after gender violence in the United States, we need to change tactics, says victims' rights attorney and TED Fellow Laura L. Dunn. Instead of going institution by institution, fighting for reform, we need to go to the Constitution and finally pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which would require states to address gender inequality and violence. By ushering in sweeping change, Dunn says, "our legal system can become a system of justice, and #MeToo can finally become 'no more.'"

Gwynne Shotwell: SpaceX's plan to fly you across the globe in 30 minutes

TED2018

Gwynne Shotwell: SpaceX's plan to fly you across the globe in 30 minutes

1,781,578 views

Readability: 4.4


What's up at SpaceX? Engineer Gwynne Shotwell was employee number seven at Elon Musk's pioneering aerospace company and is now its president. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, she discusses SpaceX's race to put people into orbit and the organization's next big project, the BFR (ask her what it stands for). The new giant rocket is designed to take humanity to Mars -- but it has another potential use: space travel for earthlings.

Zachary R. Wood: Why it's worth listening to people you disagree with

TED2018

Zachary R. Wood: Why it's worth listening to people you disagree with

1,469,839 views

Readability: 5.1


We get stronger, not weaker, by engaging with ideas and people we disagree with, says Zachary R. Wood. In an important talk about finding common ground, Wood makes the case that we can build empathy and gain understanding by engaging tactfully and thoughtfully with controversial ideas and unfamiliar perspectives. "Tuning out opposing viewpoints doesn't make them go away," Wood says. "To achieve progress in the face of adversity, we need a genuine commitment to gaining a deeper understanding of humanity."

Diane Wolk-Rogers: A Parkland teacher's homework for us all

TED2018

Diane Wolk-Rogers: A Parkland teacher's homework for us all

1,049,610 views

Readability: 4


Diane Wolk-Rogers teaches history at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, site of a horrific school shooting on Valentine's Day 2018. How can we end this senseless violence? In a stirring talk, Wolk-Rogers offers three ways Americans can move forward to create more safety and responsibility around guns -- and invites people to come up with their own answers, too. Above all, she asks us to take a cue from the student activists at her school, survivors whose work for change has moved millions to action. "They shouldn't have to do this on their own," Wolk-Rogers says. "They're asking you to get involved."

Heidi M. Sosik: The discoveries awaiting us in the ocean's twilight zone

TED2018

Heidi M. Sosik: The discoveries awaiting us in the ocean's twilight zone

918,639 views

Readability: 4.7


What will we find in the twilight zone: the vast, mysterious, virtually unexplored realm hundreds of meters below the ocean's surface? Heidi M. Sosik of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution wants to find out. In this wonder-filled talk, she shares her plan to investigate these uncharted waters, which may hold a million new species and 90 percent of the world's fish biomass, using submersible technology. What we discover there won't just astound us, Sosik says -- it will help us be better stewards of the world's oceans. (This ambitious plan is one of the first ideas of The Audacious Project, TED's new initiative to inspire global change.)

Caroline Harper: What if we eliminated one of the world's oldest diseases?

TED2018

Caroline Harper: What if we eliminated one of the world's oldest diseases?

825,343 views

Readability: 3.6


Thousands of years ago, ancient Nubians drew pictures on tomb walls of a terrible disease that turns the eyelids inside out and causes blindness. This disease, trachoma, is still a scourge in many parts of the world today -- but it's also completely preventable, says Caroline Harper. Armed with data from a global mapping project, Harper's organization Sightsavers has a plan: to focus on countries where funding gaps stand in the way of eliminating the disease and ramp up efforts where the need is most severe. Learn more about their goal of consigning trachoma to the history books -- and how you can help. (This ambitious plan is one of the first ideas of The Audacious Project, TED's new initiative to inspire global change.)

Robin Steinberg: What if we ended the injustice of bail?

TED2018

Robin Steinberg: What if we ended the injustice of bail?

1,053,813 views

Readability: 4


On any given night, more than 450,000 people in the United States are locked up in jail simply because they don't have enough money to pay bail. The sums in question are often around $500: easy for some to pay, impossible for others. This has real human consequences -- people lose jobs, homes and lives, and it drives racial disparities in the legal system. Robin Steinberg has a bold idea to change this. In this powerful talk, she outlines the plan for The Bail Project -- an unprecedented national revolving bail fund to fight mass incarceration. (This ambitious plan is one of the first ideas of The Audacious Project, TED's new initiative to inspire global change.)

Jaron Lanier: How we need to remake the internet

TED2018

Jaron Lanier: How we need to remake the internet

1,214,706 views

Readability: 4.3


In the early days of digital culture, Jaron Lanier helped craft a vision for the internet as public commons where humanity could share its knowledge -- but even then, this vision was haunted by the dark side of how it could turn out: with personal devices that control our lives, monitor our data and feed us stimuli. (Sound familiar?) In this visionary talk, Lanier reflects on a "globally tragic, astoundingly ridiculous mistake" companies like Google and Facebook made at the foundation of digital culture -- and how we can undo it. "We cannot have a society in which, if two people wish to communicate, the only way that can happen is if it's financed by a third person who wishes to manipulate them," he says.

Yasin Kakande: What's missing in the global debate over refugees

TED2018

Yasin Kakande: What's missing in the global debate over refugees

893,672 views

Readability: 5.7


In the ongoing debate over refugees, we hear from everyone -- from politicians who pledge border controls to citizens who fear they'll lose their jobs -- everyone, that is, except migrants themselves. Why are they coming? Journalist and TED Fellow Yasin Kakande explains what compelled him and many others to flee their homelands, urging a more open discussion and a new perspective. Because humanity's story, he reminds us, is a story of migration: "There are no restrictions that could ever be so rigorous to stop the wave of migration that has determined our human history," he says.

John Amory: How a male contraceptive pill could work

TEDMED 2017

John Amory: How a male contraceptive pill could work

863,109 views

Readability: 5.1


Andrologist John Amory is developing innovative male contraception that gives men a new option for taking responsibility to prevent unintended pregnancy. He details the science in development -- and why the world needs a male pill.

Clemantine Wamariya: War and what comes after

TEDWomen 2017

Clemantine Wamariya: War and what comes after

829,695 views

Readability: 2.8


Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when the Rwandan Civil War forced her and her sister to flee their home in Kigali, leaving their parents and everything they knew behind. In this deeply personal talk, she tells the story of how she became a refugee, living in camps in seven countries over the next six years -- and how she's tried to make sense of what came after.

Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe: "RainMakers"

TEDGlobal 2017

Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe: "RainMakers"

154,449 views

Readability: 0

No Transcript

Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe summon a downpour with a poetic, powerful dance performance. Set to a composition of singing, drums and strings, the dancers radiate energy -- moving in circles, in shapes and in unison as they consume the TED stage.

Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo: What it takes to be racially literate

TEDWomen 2017

Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo: What it takes to be racially literate

980,751 views

Readability: 5.1


Over the last year, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo traveled to all 50 US states, collecting personal stories about race and intersectionality. Now they're on a mission to equip every American with the tools to understand, navigate and improve a world structured by racial division. In a dynamic talk, Vulchi and Guo pair the personal stories they've collected with research and statistics to reveal two fundamental gaps in our racial literacy -- and how we can overcome them.

José Andrés: How a team of chefs fed Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

TEDxMidAtlantic

José Andrés: How a team of chefs fed Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

854,181 views

Readability: 3.4


After Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2017, chef José Andrés traveled to the devastated island with a simple idea: to feed the hungry. Millions of meals served later, Andrés shares the remarkable story of creating the world's biggest restaurant -- and the awesome power of letting people in need know that somebody cares about them.

Michael Hendryx: The shocking danger of mountaintop removal -- and why it must end

TEDMED 2017

Michael Hendryx: The shocking danger of mountaintop removal -- and why it must end

749,186 views

Readability: 5.4


Research investigator Michael Hendryx studies mountaintop removal, an explosive type of surface coal mining used in Appalachia that comes with unexpected health hazards. In this data-packed talk, Hendryx presents his research and tells the story of the pushback he's received from the coal industry, advocating for the ethical obligation scientists have to speak the truth.

Kasiva Mutua: How I use the drum to tell my story

TEDGlobal 2017

Kasiva Mutua: How I use the drum to tell my story

1,006,456 views

Readability: 4.3


In this talk-performance hybrid, drummer, percussionist and TED Fellow Kasiva Mutua shares how she's breaking the taboo against female drummers in Kenya -- and her mission to teach the significance and importance of the drum to young boys, women and girls. "Women can be custodians of culture, too," Mutua says.

Nighat Dad: How Pakistani women are taking the internet back

TEDGlobal 2017

Nighat Dad: How Pakistani women are taking the internet back

818,482 views

Readability: 4.8


TED Fellow Nighat Dad studies online harassment, especially as it relates to patriarchal cultures like the one in her small village in Pakistan. She tells the story of how she set up Pakistan's first cyber harassment helpline, offering support to women who face serious threats online. "Safe access to the internet is access to knowledge, and knowledge is freedom," she says. "When I fight for a woman's digital rights, I am fighting for equality."

Amy Edmondson: How to turn a group of strangers into a team

TEDNYC

Amy Edmondson: How to turn a group of strangers into a team

1,241,949 views

Readability: 3.9


Business school professor Amy Edmondson studies "teaming," where people come together quickly (and often temporarily) to solve new, urgent or unusual problems. Recalling stories of teamwork on the fly, such as the incredible rescue of 33 miners trapped half a mile underground in Chile in 2010, Edmondson shares the elements needed to turn a group of strangers into a quick-thinking team that can nimbly respond to challenges.

Brett Hennig: What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people?

TEDxDanubia

Brett Hennig: What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people?

1,115,375 views

Readability: 4.1


If you think democracy is broken, here's an idea: let's replace politicians with randomly selected people. Author and activist Brett Hennig presents a compelling case for sortition democracy, or random selection of government officials -- a system with roots in ancient Athens that taps into the wisdom of the crowd and entrusts ordinary people with making balanced decisions for the greater good of everyone. Sound crazy? Learn more about how it could work to create a world free of partisan politics.

LB Hannahs: What it's like to be a transgender dad

TEDxUF

LB Hannahs: What it's like to be a transgender dad

969,832 views

Readability: 4.1


LB Hannahs candidly shares the experience of parenting as a genderqueer individual -- and what it can teach us about authenticity and advocacy. "Authenticity doesn't mean 'comfortable.' It means managing and negotiating the discomfort of everyday life," Hannahs says.

Sarah Murray: A playful solution to the housing crisis

TED@Westpac

Sarah Murray: A playful solution to the housing crisis

880,482 views

Readability: 4.6


Frustrated by her lack of self-determination in the housing market, Sarah Murray created a computer game that allows home buyers to design a house and have it delivered to them in modular components that can be assembled on-site. Learn how her effort is putting would-be homeowners in control of the largest purchase of their lives -- as well as cutting costs, protecting the environment and helping provide homes for those in need.

Robert Neuwirth: The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them

TEDGlobal 2017

Robert Neuwirth: The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them

879,871 views

Readability: 4.3


From rides to homes and beyond, we're sharing everything these days, with the help of digital tools. But as modern and high-tech as the sharing economy seems, it's been alive in Africa for centuries, according to author Robert Neuwirth. He shares fascinating examples -- like apprenticeships that work like locally generated venture capital and systems for allocating scarce water -- and says that if we can propagate and scale these models, they could help communities thrive from the bottom up.

Eric Berridge: Why tech needs the humanities

TED@IBM

Eric Berridge: Why tech needs the humanities

899,467 views

Readability: 4.6


If you want to build a team of innovative problem-solvers, you should value the humanities just as much as the sciences, says entrepreneur Eric Berridge. He shares why tech companies should look beyond STEM graduates for new hires -- and how people with backgrounds in the arts and humanities can bring creativity and insight to technical workplaces.

Mark Tyndall: The harm reduction model of drug addiction treatment

TEDMED 2017

Mark Tyndall: The harm reduction model of drug addiction treatment

973,801 views

Readability: 5.4


Why do we still think that drug use is a law-enforcement issue? Making drugs illegal does nothing to stop people from using them, says public health expert Mark Tyndall. So, what might work? Tyndall shares community-based research that shows how harm-reduction strategies, like safe-injection sites, are working to address the drug overdose crisis.

Sarah Donnelly: How work kept me going during my cancer treatment

TED@Westpac

Sarah Donnelly: How work kept me going during my cancer treatment

770,320 views

Readability: 3.8


When lawyer Sarah Donnelly was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to her friends and family for support -- but she also found meaning, focus and stability in her work. In a personal talk about why and how she stayed on the job, she shares her insights on how workplaces can accommodate people going through major illnesses -- because the benefits go both ways.