Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar

TEDGlobal 2011

Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar

18,414,997 views

Readability: 3.8


On any given day we're lied to from 10 to 200 times, and the clues to detect those lie can be subtle and counter-intuitive. Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, shows the manners and "hotspots" used by those trained to recognize deception -- and she argues honesty is a value worth preserving.

Michael Nielsen: Open science now!

TEDxWaterloo

Michael Nielsen: Open science now!

159,008 views

Readability: 0

No Transcript

What if every scientist could share their data as easily as they tweet about their lunch? Michael Nielsen calls for scientists to embrace new tools for collaboration that will enable discoveries to happen at the speed of Twitter.

Ian Ritchie: The day I turned down Tim Berners-Lee

TEDGlobal 2011

Ian Ritchie: The day I turned down Tim Berners-Lee

594,087 views

Readability: 4.7


Imagine it's late 1990, and you've just met a nice young man named Tim Berners-Lee, who starts telling you about his proposed system called the World Wide Web. Ian Ritchie was there. And ... he didn't buy it. A short story about information, connectivity and learning from mistakes.

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

TEDSalon London Spring 2011

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

987,158 views

Readability: 3


A story, a work of art, a face, a designed object -- how do we tell that something is beautiful? And why does it matter so much to us? Designer Richard Seymour explores our response to beauty and the surprising power of objects that exhibit it.

Paul Lewis: How mobile phones helped solve two murders

TEDxThessaloniki

Paul Lewis: How mobile phones helped solve two murders

206,489 views

Readability: 4.3


Two murders sat unexplained and unsolved -- until reporter Paul Lewis starting talking to bystanders who had evidence on their mobile phones. Step by step, Lewis pieced together their evidence and their stories to find justice for the victims. It's the future of investigative journalism, powered by the crowd.

Alison Gopnik: What do babies think?

TEDGlobal 2011

Alison Gopnik: What do babies think?

3,164,690 views

Readability: 3.4


"Babies and young children are like the R&D division of the human species," says psychologist Alison Gopnik. Her research explores the sophisticated intelligence-gathering and decision-making that babies are really doing when they play.

Charles Hazlewood: Trusting the ensemble

TEDGlobal 2011

Charles Hazlewood: Trusting the ensemble

518,527 views

Readability: 3.8


Conductor Charles Hazlewood talks about the role of trust in musical leadership -- then shows how it works, as he conducts the Scottish Ensemble onstage. He also shares clips from two musical projects: the opera "U-Carmen eKhayelitsha" and the ParaOrchestra.

Mike Biddle: We can recycle plastic

TEDGlobal 2011

Mike Biddle: We can recycle plastic

1,029,598 views

Readability: 3.9


Less than 10% of plastic trash is recycled -- compared to almost 90% of metals -- because of the massively complicated problem of finding and sorting the different kinds. Frustrated by this waste, Mike Biddle has developed a cheap and incredibly energy efficient plant that can, and does, recycle any kind of plastic.

Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness

TED2011

Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness

4,008,859 views

Readability: 3.1


Writer and designer Graham Hill asks: Can having less stuff, in less room, lead to more happiness? He makes the case for taking up less space, and lays out three rules for editing your life.

Christoph Adami: Finding life we can't imagine

TEDxUIUC

Christoph Adami: Finding life we can't imagine

605,140 views

Readability: 3.7


How do we search for alien life if it's nothing like the life that we know? Christoph Adami shows how he uses his research into artificial life -- self-replicating computer programs -- to find a signature, a "biomarker," that is free of our preconceptions of what life is.

Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China

TEDGlobal 2011

Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China

1,842,334 views

Readability: 4.3


Yang Lan, a journalist and entrepreneur who's been called "the Oprah of China," offers insight into the next generation of young Chinese citizens -- urban, connected (via microblogs) and alert to injustice.

Danielle de Niese: A flirtatious aria

TEDGlobal 2011

Danielle de Niese: A flirtatious aria

816,303 views

Readability: 3.3


Can opera be ever-so-slightly sexy? The glorious soprano Danielle de Niese shows how, singing the flirty "Meine Lippen, sie küssen so heiss." Which, translated, means, as you might guess: "I kiss so hot." From Giuditta by Frans Lehár; accompanist: Ingrid Surgenor.

Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science

TEDGlobal 2011

Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science

2,316,317 views

Readability: 4.3


Every day there are news reports of new health advice, but how can you know if they're right? Doctor and epidemiologist Ben Goldacre shows us, at high speed, the ways evidence can be distorted, from the blindingly obvious nutrition claims to the very subtle tricks of the pharmaceutical industry.

Geoff Mulgan: A short intro to the Studio School

TEDGlobal 2011

Geoff Mulgan: A short intro to the Studio School

692,557 views

Readability: 4


Some kids learn by listening; others learn by doing. Geoff Mulgan gives a short introduction to the Studio School, a new kind of school in the UK where small teams of kids learn by working on projects that are, as Mulgan puts it, "for real."

Abraham Verghese: A doctor's touch

TEDGlobal 2011

Abraham Verghese: A doctor's touch

1,484,216 views

Readability: 4.2


Modern medicine is in danger of losing a powerful, old-fashioned tool: human touch. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are merely data points, and calls for a return to the traditional one-on-one physical exam.

Sunni Brown: Doodlers, unite!

TED2011

Sunni Brown: Doodlers, unite!

1,372,278 views

Readability: 5.2


Studies show that sketching and doodling improve our comprehension -- and our creative thinking. So why do we still feel embarrassed when we're caught doodling in a meeting? Sunni Brown says: Doodlers, unite! She makes the case for unlocking your brain via pad and pen.

Elizabeth Murchison: Fighting a contagious cancer

TEDGlobal 2011

Elizabeth Murchison: Fighting a contagious cancer

494,586 views

Readability: 4.8


What is killing the Tasmanian devil? A virulent cancer is infecting them by the thousands -- and unlike most cancers, it's contagious. Researcher Elizabeth Murchison tells us how she's fighting to save the Taz, and what she's learning about all cancers from this unusual strain. Contains disturbing images of facial cancer.

Amy Lockwood: Selling condoms in the Congo

TEDGlobal 2011

Amy Lockwood: Selling condoms in the Congo

856,762 views

Readability: 3.7


HIV is a serious problem in the DR Congo, and aid agencies have flooded the country with free and cheap condoms. But few people are using them. Why? "Reformed marketer" Amy Lockwood offers a surprising answer that upends a traditional model of philanthropy. (Some NSFW images.)

Niall Ferguson: The 6 killer apps of prosperity

TEDGlobal 2011

Niall Ferguson: The 6 killer apps of prosperity

1,607,804 views

Readability: 4.7


Over the past few centuries, Western cultures have been very good at creating general prosperity for themselves. Historian Niall Ferguson asks: Why the West, and less so the rest? He suggests half a dozen big ideas from Western culture -- call them the 6 killer apps -- that promote wealth, stability and innovation. And in this new century, he says, these apps are all shareable.

Sasha Dichter: The Generosity Experiment

NextGen:Charity

Sasha Dichter: The Generosity Experiment

298,402 views

Readability: 0

No Transcript

In this inspiring talk at the NextGen:Charity conference, Sasha Dichter of the Acumen Fund shares the results of his month-long "Generosity Experiment" where he said "yes" to every request for help.

Lauren Zalaznick: The conscience of television

TEDWomen 2010

Lauren Zalaznick: The conscience of television

680,622 views

Readability: 4.3


TV executive Lauren Zalaznick thinks deeply about pop television. Sharing results of a bold study that tracks attitudes against TV ratings over five decades, she makes a case that television reflects who we truly are -- in ways we might not have expected.

Kate Hartman: The art of wearable communication

TED2011

Kate Hartman: The art of wearable communication

896,426 views

Readability: 4.2


Artist Kate Hartman uses wearable electronics to explore how we communicate, with ourselves and with the world. In this quirky and thought-provoking talk, she shows the "Talk to Yourself Hat", the "Inflatable Heart", the "Glacier Embracing Suit", and other unexpected devices.

Misha Glenny: Hire the hackers!

TEDGlobal 2011

Misha Glenny: Hire the hackers!

1,303,053 views

Readability: 5.1


Despite multibillion-dollar investments in cybersecurity, one of its root problems has been largely ignored: who are the people who write malicious code? Underworld investigator Misha Glenny profiles several convicted coders from around the world and reaches a startling conclusion.

Yasheng Huang: Does democracy stifle economic growth?

TEDGlobal 2011

Yasheng Huang: Does democracy stifle economic growth?

1,025,041 views

Readability: 5


Economist Yasheng Huang compares China to India, and asks how China's authoritarian rule contributed to its astonishing economic growth -- leading to a big question: Is democracy actually holding India back? Huang's answer may surprise you.

Raghava KK: Shake up your story

TEDGlobal 2011

Raghava KK: Shake up your story

959,016 views

Readability: 3.9


Artist Raghava KK demos his new children's book for iPad with a fun feature: when you shake it, the story -- and your perspective -- changes. In this charming short talk, he invites all of us to shake up our perspective a little bit.

Lee Cronin: Making matter come alive

TEDGlobal 2011

Lee Cronin: Making matter come alive

706,172 views

Readability: 3.8


Before life existed on Earth, there was just matter, inorganic dead "stuff." How improbable is it that life arose? And -- could it use a different type of chemistry? Using an elegant definition of life (anything that can evolve), chemist Lee Cronin is exploring this question by attempting to create a fully inorganic cell using a "Lego kit" of inorganic molecules -- no carbon -- that can assemble, replicate and compete.

Edward Tenner: Unintended consequences

TED2011

Edward Tenner: Unintended consequences

800,938 views

Readability: 4.4


Every new invention changes the world -- in ways both intentional and unexpected. Historian Edward Tenner tells stories that illustrate the under-appreciated gap between our ability to innovate and our ability to foresee the consequences.