Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?

TEDGlobal 2013

Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?

6,928,766 views

Readability: 4


Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist: He studies the sleep cycles of the brain. And he asks: What do we know about sleep? Not a lot, it turns out, for something we do with one-third of our lives. In this talk, Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages -- and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health.

Shigeru Ban: Emergency shelters made from paper

TEDxTokyo

Shigeru Ban: Emergency shelters made from paper

1,637,663 views

Readability: 4.3


Long before sustainability was a buzzword, architect Shigeru Ban was using ecologically sound building materials such as cardboard tubes. He uses them to build remarkable temporary structures for disaster-struck nations such as Haiti, Rwanda and Japan. Yet often, these buildings remain a beloved part of the landscape long after they have served their intended purpose.

Derek Paravicini and Adam Ockelford: In the key of genius

TEDxWarwick

Derek Paravicini and Adam Ockelford: In the key of genius

1,529,663 views

Readability: 3.5


Born three and a half months prematurely, Derek Paravicini is blind and has severe autism. But with perfect pitch, innate talent and a lot of practice, he became a concert pianist by the age of 10. Here, his longtime piano teacher, Adam Ockelford, explains his student's unique relationship to music, while Paravicini shows how he has ripped up the "Chopsticks" rulebook.

Saki Mafundikwa: Ingenuity and elegance in ancient African alphabets

TED2013

Saki Mafundikwa: Ingenuity and elegance in ancient African alphabets

744,167 views

Readability: 5.6


From simple alphabets to secret symbolic languages, graphic designer Saki Mafundikwa celebrates the many forms of written communication across the continent of Africa. He highlights the history and legacy that are embodied in written words and symbols, and urges African designers to draw on these graphic forms for fresh inspiration. It's summed up in his favorite Ghanaian glyph, Sankofa, which means "return and get it" -- or "learn from the past."

Jinsop Lee: Design for all 5 senses

TED2013

Jinsop Lee: Design for all 5 senses

1,544,558 views

Readability: 3.4


Good design looks great, yes -- but why shouldn't it also feel great, smell great and sound great? Designer Jinsop Lee (a TED Talent Search winner) shares his theory of 5-sense design, with a handy graph and a few examples. His hope: to inspire you to notice great multisensory experiences.

Daniel H. Cohen: For argument's sake

TEDxColbyCollege

Daniel H. Cohen: For argument's sake

1,495,168 views

Readability: 4.3


Why do we argue? To out-reason our opponents, prove them wrong, and, most of all, to win! Right? Philosopher Daniel H. Cohen shows how our most common form of argument -- a war in which one person must win and the other must lose -- misses out on the real benefits of engaging in active disagreement.

Beardyman: The polyphonic me

TED2013

Beardyman: The polyphonic me

2,168,772 views

Readability: 3.1


Frustrated by not being able to sing two notes at the same time, musical inventor Beardyman built a machine to allow him to create loops and layers from just the sounds he makes with his voice. Given that he can effortlessly conjure the sound of everything from crying babies to buzzing flies, not to mention mimic pretty much any musical instrument imaginable, that's a lot of different sounds. Sit back and let the wall of sound of this dazzling performance wash over you.

Suzanne Talhouk: Don't kill your language

TEDxBeirut

Suzanne Talhouk: Don't kill your language

1,303,773 views

Readability: 3.4


More and more, English is a global language; speaking it is perceived as a sign of being modern. But -- what do we lose when we leave behind our mother tongues? Suzanne Talhouk makes an impassioned case to love your own language, and to cherish what it can express that no other language can. In Arabic with subtitles.

Peter van Manen: Better baby care -- thanks to Formula 1

TEDxNijmegen

Peter van Manen: Better baby care -- thanks to Formula 1

808,759 views

Readability: 3.5


During a Formula 1 race, a car sends hundreds of millions of data points to its garage for real-time analysis and feedback. So why not use this detailed and rigorous data system elsewhere, like at children's hospitals? Peter van Manen tells us more.

Julie Taymor: Spider-Man, The Lion King and life on the creative edge

TED2011

Julie Taymor: Spider-Man, The Lion King and life on the creative edge

987,436 views

Readability: 3.2


Showing spectacular clips from productions such as Frida, The Tempest and The Lion King, director Julie Taymor describes a life spent immersed in theater and the movies. Filmed right as controversy over her Broadway production of Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark was at its peak, she candidly describes the tensions inherent within her creative process, as she strives both to capture the essence of a story--and produce images and experiences unlike anything else.

Eleanor Longden: The voices in my head

TED2013

Eleanor Longden: The voices in my head

4,362,723 views

Readability: 5


To all appearances, Eleanor Longden was just like every other student, heading to college full of promise and without a care in the world. That was until the voices in her head started talking. Initially innocuous, these internal narrators became increasingly antagonistic and dictatorial, turning her life into a living nightmare. Diagnosed with schizophrenia, hospitalized, drugged, Longden was discarded by a system that didn't know how to help her. Longden tells the moving tale of her years-long journey back to mental health, and makes the case that it was through learning to listen to her voices that she was able to survive.

Eli Beer: The fastest ambulance? A motorcycle

TEDMED 2013

Eli Beer: The fastest ambulance? A motorcycle

1,081,843 views

Readability: 3.4


As a young EMT on a Jerusalem ambulance, Eli Beer realized that, stuck in brutal urban traffic, they often arrived too late to help. So he organized a group of volunteer EMTs -- many on foot -- ready to drop everything and dash to save lives in their neighborhood. Today, United Hatzlah uses a smartphone app and a fleet of "ambucycles" to help nearby patients until an ambulance arrives. With an average response time of 3 minutes, last year, they treated 207,000 people in Israel. And the idea is going global.

Bastian Schaefer: A 3D-printed jumbo jet?

TEDGlobal 2013

Bastian Schaefer: A 3D-printed jumbo jet?

1,123,511 views

Readability: 4.6


Designer Bastian Schaefer shows off a speculative design for the future of jet planes, with a skeleton inspired by strong, flexible, natural forms and by the needs of the world's, ahem, growing population. Imagine an airplane that's full of light and space -- and built up from generative parts in a 3D printer.

Tania Luna: How a penny made me feel like a millionaire

TED@New York

Tania Luna: How a penny made me feel like a millionaire

1,712,075 views

Readability: 3.1


As a young child, Tania Luna left her home in post-Chernobyl Ukraine to take asylum in the US. And one day, on the floor of the New York homeless shelter where she and her family lived, she found a penny. She has never again felt so rich. A meditation on the bittersweet joys of childhood -- and how to hold them in mind.

Roberto D'Angelo + Francesca Fedeli: In our baby's illness, a life lesson

TEDGlobal 2013

Roberto D'Angelo + Francesca Fedeli: In our baby's illness, a life lesson

1,168,356 views

Readability: 3.3


Roberto D'Angelo and Francesca Fedeli thought their baby boy Mario was healthy -- until at 10 days old, they discovered he'd had a perinatal stroke. With Mario unable to control the left side of his body, they grappled with tough questions: Would he be "normal?” Could he live a full life? The poignant story of parents facing their fears -- and how they turned them around.

Paul Kemp-Robertson: Bitcoin. Sweat. Tide. Meet the future of branded currency.

TEDGlobal 2013

Paul Kemp-Robertson: Bitcoin. Sweat. Tide. Meet the future of branded currency.

1,208,375 views

Readability: 4.7


Currency -- the bills and coins you carry in your wallet and in your bank account -- is founded on marketing, on the belief that banks and governments are trustworthy. Now, Paul Kemp-Robertson walks us through a new generation of currency, supported by that same marketing ... but on behalf of a private brand. From Nike Sweat Points to bottles of Tide (which are finding an unexpected use in illegal markets), meet the non-bank future of currencies.

John Searle: Our shared condition -- consciousness

TEDxCERN

John Searle: Our shared condition -- consciousness

1,382,992 views

Readability: 4.3


Philosopher John Searle lays out the case for studying human consciousness -- and systematically shoots down some of the common objections to taking it seriously. As we learn more about the brain processes that cause awareness, accepting that consciousness is a biological phenomenon is an important first step. And no, he says, consciousness is not a massive computer simulation.

Kate Stone: DJ decks made of ... paper

TED2013

Kate Stone: DJ decks made of ... paper

695,592 views

Readability: 3.3


"I love paper, and I love technology," says physicist and former sheep herder Kate Stone, who's spent the past decade working to unite the two. Her experiments combine regular paper with conductive inks and tiny circuit boards to offer a unique, magical experience. To date, applications include a newspaper embedded with audio and video, posters that display energy usage in real time, and the extremely nifty paper drumkit and set of DJ decks she demonstrates onstage.

Tom Thum: The orchestra in my mouth

TEDxSydney

Tom Thum: The orchestra in my mouth

12,919,624 views

Readability: 3.5


In a highly entertaining performance, beatboxer Tom Thum slings beats, comedy and a mouthful of instrumental impersonations into 11 minutes of creativity and fun that will make you smile.

Chrystia Freeland: The rise of the new global super-rich

TEDGlobal 2013

Chrystia Freeland: The rise of the new global super-rich

1,989,427 views

Readability: 5.1


Technology is advancing in leaps and bounds -- and so is economic inequality, says writer Chrystia Freeland. In an impassioned talk, she charts the rise of a new class of plutocrats (those who are extremely powerful because they are extremely wealthy), and suggests that globalization and new technology are actually fueling, rather than closing, the global income gap. Freeland lays out three problems with plutocracy … and one glimmer of hope.

Dong Woo Jang: The art of bow-making

TED2013

Dong Woo Jang: The art of bow-making

2,364,255 views

Readability: 4.1


Dong Woo Jang has an unusual after school hobby. Jang, who was 15 when he gave the talk, tells the story of how living in the concrete jungle of Seoul inspired him to build the perfect bow. Watch him demo one of his beautiful hand-crafted archer's bows.

Pico Iyer: Where is home?

TEDGlobal 2013

Pico Iyer: Where is home?

3,148,160 views

Readability: 3.5


More and more people worldwide are living in countries not considered their own. Writer Pico Iyer -- who himself has three or four “origins” -- meditates on the meaning of home, the joy of traveling and the serenity of standing still.

Bernie Krause: The voice of the natural world

TEDGlobal 2013

Bernie Krause: The voice of the natural world

1,076,244 views

Readability: 4.8


Bernie Krause has been recording wild soundscapes -- the wind in the trees, the chirping of birds, the subtle sounds of insect larvae -- for 45 years. In that time, he has seen many environments radically altered by humans, sometimes even by practices thought to be environmentally safe. A surprising look at what we can learn through nature's symphonies, from the grunting of a sea anemone to the sad calls of a beaver in mourning.

Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer ... from a teenager

TED2013

Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer ... from a teenager

4,654,746 views

Readability: 4.7


Over 85 percent of all pancreatic cancers are diagnosed late, when someone has less than two percent chance of survival. How could this be? Jack Andraka talks about how he developed a promising early detection test for pancreatic cancer that's super cheap, effective and non-invasive -- all before his 16th birthday.

The interspecies internet? An idea in progress

TED2013

The interspecies internet? An idea in progress

733,903 views

Readability: 4.4


Apes, dolphins and elephants are animals with remarkable communication skills. Could the internet be expanded to include sentient species like them? A new and developing idea from a panel of four great thinkers -- dolphin researcher Diana Reiss, musician Peter Gabriel, internet of things visionary Neil Gershenfeld and Vint Cerf, one of the fathers of the internet.

Michael Green: Why we should build wooden skyscrapers

TED2013

Michael Green: Why we should build wooden skyscrapers

1,268,950 views

Readability: 3.7


Building a skyscraper? Forget about steel and concrete, says architect Michael Green, and build it out of … wood. As he details in this intriguing talk, it's not only possible to build safe wooden structures up to 30 stories tall (and, he hopes, higher), it's necessary.

Charmian Gooch: Meet global corruption's hidden players

TEDGlobal 2013

Charmian Gooch: Meet global corruption's hidden players

1,626,109 views

Readability: 4.5


When the son of the president of a desperately poor country starts buying mansions and sportscars on an official monthly salary of $7,000, Charmian Gooch suggests, corruption is probably somewhere in the picture. In a blistering, eye-opening talk (with several specific examples), she details how global corruption trackers follow the money -- to some surprisingly familiar faces.

Mohamed Hijri: A simple solution to the coming phosphorus crisis

TEDxUdeM

Mohamed Hijri: A simple solution to the coming phosphorus crisis

637,056 views

Readability: 4.3


There's a farming crisis no one is talking about: The world is running out of phosphorus, an essential element that's a key component of DNA and the basis of cellular communication. As biologist Mohamed Hijri shows, all roads of this crisis lead back to how we farm -- with chemical fertilizers chock-full of the element, which plants are not efficient at absorbing. One solution? A microscopic mushroom ...

Sleepy Man Banjo Boys: Bluegrass virtuosity from ... New Jersey?

TED2013

Sleepy Man Banjo Boys: Bluegrass virtuosity from ... New Jersey?

6,000,405 views

Readability: 3.2


All under the age of 16, brothers Jonny, Robbie and Tommy Mizzone are from New Jersey, a US state that's better known for the rock of Bruce Springsteen than the bluegrass of Earl Scruggs. Nonetheless, the siblings began performing bluegrass covers, as well as their own compositions, at a young age. Here, they play three dazzling songs in three different keys, passing the lead back and forth from fiddle to banjo to guitar.

Jinha Lee: Reach into the computer and grab a pixel

TED2013

Jinha Lee: Reach into the computer and grab a pixel

1,825,069 views

Readability: 5.4


The border between our physical world and the digital information surrounding us has been getting thinner and thinner. Designer and engineer Jinha Lee wants to dissolve it altogether. As he demonstrates in this short, gasp-inducing talk, his ideas include a pen that penetrates into a screen to draw 3D models and SpaceTop, a computer desktop prototype that lets you reach through the screen to manipulate digital objects.