Paul Zak: Trust, morality -- and oxytocin?

TEDGlobal 2011

Paul Zak: Trust, morality -- and oxytocin?

1,553,086 views


What drives our desire to behave morally? Neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls it "the moral molecule") is responsible for trust, empathy and other feelings that help build a stable society. NOTE: Research and statements in this talk have been challenged by other scientists working in this field. Please read "Criticisms & Updates" below for more details.

Hasan Elahi: FBI, here I am!

TEDGlobal 2011

Hasan Elahi: FBI, here I am!

830,424 views


After he ended up on a watch list by accident, Hasan Elahi was advised by his local FBI agents to let them know when he was traveling. He did that and more ... much more.

Béatrice Coron: Stories cut from paper

TED2011

Béatrice Coron: Stories cut from paper

941,840 views


With scissors and paper, artist Béatrice Coron creates intricate worlds, cities and countries, heavens and hells. Striding onstage in a glorious cape cut from Tyvek, she describes her creative process and the way her stories develop from snips and slices.

Jay Bradner: Open-source cancer research

TEDxBoston 2011

Jay Bradner: Open-source cancer research

516,654 views


How does cancer know it's cancer? At Jay Bradner's lab, they found a molecule that might hold the answer, JQ1. But instead of patenting it and reaping the profits (as many other labs have done) -- they published their findings and mailed samples to 40 other labs to work on. An inspiring look at the open-source future of medical research.

Iain McGilchrist: The divided brain

RSA Animate

Iain McGilchrist: The divided brain

657,963 views

No Transcript

Psychiatrist Iain McGilchrist describes the real differences between the left and right halves of the human brain. It's not simply "emotion on the right, reason on the left," but something far more complex and interesting. A Best of the Web talk from RSA Animate.

Richard Wilkinson: How economic inequality harms societies

TEDGlobal 2011

Richard Wilkinson: How economic inequality harms societies

2,575,695 views


We feel instinctively that societies with huge income gaps are somehow going wrong. Richard Wilkinson charts the hard data on economic inequality, and shows what gets worse when rich and poor are too far apart: real effects on health, lifespan, even such basic values as trust.

Nathalie Miebach: Art made of storms

TEDGlobal 2011

Nathalie Miebach: Art made of storms

737,611 views


Artist Nathalie Miebach takes weather data from massive storms and turns it into complex sculptures that embody the forces of nature and time. These sculptures then become musical scores for a string quartet to play.

Todd Kuiken: A prosthetic arm that "feels"

TEDGlobal 2011

Todd Kuiken: A prosthetic arm that "feels"

852,454 views


Physiatrist and engineer Todd Kuiken is building a prosthetic arm that connects with the human nervous system -- improving motion, control and even feeling. Onstage, patient Amanda Kitts helps demonstrate this next-gen robotic arm.

Guy-Philippe Goldstein: How cyberattacks threaten real-world peace

TEDxParis 2010

Guy-Philippe Goldstein: How cyberattacks threaten real-world peace

480,428 views


Nations can now attack other nations with cyber weapons: silent strikes on another country's computer systems, power grids, dams that leave no trace behind. (Think of the Stuxnet worm.) Guy-Philippe Goldstein shows how cyberattacks can leap between the digital and physical worlds to prompt armed conflict -- and how we might avert this global security hazard.

Justin Hall-Tipping: Freeing energy from the grid

TEDGlobal 2011

Justin Hall-Tipping: Freeing energy from the grid

1,055,408 views


What would happen if we could generate power from our windowpanes? In this moving talk, entrepreneur Justin Hall-Tipping shows the materials that could make that possible, and how questioning our notion of 'normal' can lead to extraordinary breakthroughs.

Bunker Roy: Learning from a barefoot movement

TEDGlobal 2011

Bunker Roy: Learning from a barefoot movement

3,663,778 views


In Rajasthan, India, an extraordinary school teaches rural women and men -- many of them illiterate -- to become solar engineers, artisans, dentists and doctors in their own villages. It's called the Barefoot College, and its founder, Bunker Roy, explains how it works.

Jae Rhim Lee: My mushroom burial suit

TEDGlobal 2011

Jae Rhim Lee: My mushroom burial suit

1,446,338 views


Here's a powerful provocation from artist Jae Rhim Lee. Can we commit our bodies to a cleaner, greener Earth, even after death? Naturally -- using a special burial suit seeded with pollution-gobbling mushrooms. Yes, this just might be the strangest TEDTalk you'll ever see ...

Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar

TEDGlobal 2011

Pamela Meyer: How to spot a liar

17,600,754 views


On any given day we're lied to from 10 to 200 times, and the clues to detect those lie can be subtle and counter-intuitive. Pamela Meyer, author of Liespotting, shows the manners and "hotspots" used by those trained to recognize deception -- and she argues honesty is a value worth preserving.

Michael Nielsen: Open science now!

TEDxWaterloo

Michael Nielsen: Open science now!

141,319 views

No Transcript

What if every scientist could share their data as easily as they tweet about their lunch? Michael Nielsen calls for scientists to embrace new tools for collaboration that will enable discoveries to happen at the speed of Twitter.

Ian Ritchie: The day I turned down Tim Berners-Lee

TEDGlobal 2011

Ian Ritchie: The day I turned down Tim Berners-Lee

584,791 views


Imagine it's late 1990, and you've just met a nice young man named Tim Berners-Lee, who starts telling you about his proposed system called the World Wide Web. Ian Ritchie was there. And ... he didn't buy it. A short story about information, connectivity and learning from mistakes.

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

TEDSalon London Spring 2011

Richard Seymour: How beauty feels

963,428 views


A story, a work of art, a face, a designed object -- how do we tell that something is beautiful? And why does it matter so much to us? Designer Richard Seymour explores our response to beauty and the surprising power of objects that exhibit it.

Paul Lewis: How mobile phones helped solve two murders

TEDxThessaloniki

Paul Lewis: How mobile phones helped solve two murders

157,273 views

No Transcript

Two murders sat unexplained and unsolved -- until reporter Paul Lewis starting talking to bystanders who had evidence on their mobile phones. Step by step, Lewis pieced together their evidence and their stories to find justice for the victims. It's the future of investigative journalism, powered by the crowd.

Alison Gopnik: What do babies think?

TEDGlobal 2011

Alison Gopnik: What do babies think?

3,018,931 views


"Babies and young children are like the R&D division of the human species," says psychologist Alison Gopnik. Her research explores the sophisticated intelligence-gathering and decision-making that babies are really doing when they play.

Charles Hazlewood: Trusting the ensemble

TEDGlobal 2011

Charles Hazlewood: Trusting the ensemble

509,662 views


Conductor Charles Hazlewood talks about the role of trust in musical leadership -- then shows how it works, as he conducts the Scottish Ensemble onstage. He also shares clips from two musical projects: the opera "U-Carmen eKhayelitsha" and the ParaOrchestra.

Mike Biddle: We can recycle plastic

TEDGlobal 2011

Mike Biddle: We can recycle plastic

993,078 views


Less than 10% of plastic trash is recycled -- compared to almost 90% of metals -- because of the massively complicated problem of finding and sorting the different kinds. Frustrated by this waste, Mike Biddle has developed a cheap and incredibly energy efficient plant that can, and does, recycle any kind of plastic.

Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness

TED2011

Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness

3,870,692 views


Writer and designer Graham Hill asks: Can having less stuff, in less room, lead to more happiness? He makes the case for taking up less space, and lays out three rules for editing your life.

Christoph Adami: Finding life we can't imagine

TEDxUIUC

Christoph Adami: Finding life we can't imagine

602,019 views


How do we search for alien life if it's nothing like the life that we know? Christoph Adami shows how he uses his research into artificial life -- self-replicating computer programs -- to find a signature, a "biomarker," that is free of our preconceptions of what life is.

Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China

TEDGlobal 2011

Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China

1,807,270 views


Yang Lan, a journalist and entrepreneur who's been called "the Oprah of China," offers insight into the next generation of young Chinese citizens -- urban, connected (via microblogs) and alert to injustice.

Danielle de Niese: A flirtatious aria

TEDGlobal 2011

Danielle de Niese: A flirtatious aria

800,106 views


Can opera be ever-so-slightly sexy? The glorious soprano Danielle de Niese shows how, singing the flirty "Meine Lippen, sie küssen so heiss." Which, translated, means, as you might guess: "I kiss so hot." From Giuditta by Frans Lehár; accompanist: Ingrid Surgenor.

Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science

TEDGlobal 2011

Ben Goldacre: Battling bad science

2,254,704 views


Every day there are news reports of new health advice, but how can you know if they're right? Doctor and epidemiologist Ben Goldacre shows us, at high speed, the ways evidence can be distorted, from the blindingly obvious nutrition claims to the very subtle tricks of the pharmaceutical industry.

Jarreth Merz: Filming democracy in Ghana

TEDGlobal 2011

Jarreth Merz: Filming democracy in Ghana

402,955 views


Jarreth Merz, a Swiss-Ghanaian filmmaker, came to Ghana in 2008 to film the national elections. What he saw there taught him new lessons about democracy -- and about himself.

Geoff Mulgan: A short intro to the Studio School

TEDGlobal 2011

Geoff Mulgan: A short intro to the Studio School

678,997 views


Some kids learn by listening; others learn by doing. Geoff Mulgan gives a short introduction to the Studio School, a new kind of school in the UK where small teams of kids learn by working on projects that are, as Mulgan puts it, "for real."

Abraham Verghese: A doctor's touch

TEDGlobal 2011

Abraham Verghese: A doctor's touch

1,433,446 views


Modern medicine is in danger of losing a powerful, old-fashioned tool: human touch. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are merely data points, and calls for a return to the traditional one-on-one physical exam.

Sunni Brown: Doodlers, unite!

TED2011

Sunni Brown: Doodlers, unite!

1,330,953 views


Studies show that sketching and doodling improve our comprehension -- and our creative thinking. So why do we still feel embarrassed when we're caught doodling in a meeting? Sunni Brown says: Doodlers, unite! She makes the case for unlocking your brain via pad and pen.